Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Sixgun Symphony #62632

Question about saddle ring

Recommended Posts

Was the saddle ring on the lever action carbines meant to be used on the civil war style cavalry carbine slings?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used mainly to tie the firearm into the scabbard on a saddle.

Once folks started riding a horse most everywhere (after the Civil War), there was little need for a sling.

 

Good luck, GJ

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's original intent was to keep the carbine attached to the rider. Firearm manufacturers have always sought gov't contacts. Horse riding civilians also found them useful.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, J Bird Blue, SASS # 57924 said:

It's original intent was to keep the carbine attached to the rider. Firearm manufacturers have always sought gov't contacts. Horse riding civilians also found them useful.

The ring was to be hooked to the wide leather sling, by means of a large snap hook, as J Bird Blue posted above.  The sling was worn from the left shoulder, across the trooper's body, with the barrel inserted through a leather loop on the saddle rigging's right side.  The problem with the original loop was if the rider got thrown from the horse, the carbine barrel might not slip free of the loop, with dessertous results! A sergeant came up with a loop that was a leather-line metal partial loop that allowed the barrel to come through the front. It wasn't until the 1890's that the Army finally adopted a half-scabbard attached to the saddle.  I'm not sure whether they got rid of the sling at the time of the half-scabbard, or waited until the full scabbards came out.

Whether the manufacturers were trying to get a government contract, or just doing it for style, most civilians who used the ring at all, ran a leather thong through it, and draped the thong over the saddle horn.  Problem with that, of course, was the carbine would flop around, banging the horse and rider. 

 

I do understand that some hombres would undo the ring from the carbine, and, with a long-handled tongs and a hot fire,  it made a fairly useful running iron! :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information guys.

 I know that SASS would not allow the use of a cavalry sling for a lever carbine, but I like the idea and might try that for some run and gun shooting where I can transition from the lever carbine to the sidearm.   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Howdy

 

Here is the main problem with saddle rings.

 

Over time the ring makes an ugly mark as it wears through the blue.

 

From being carried for many years.

 

Model%201892%20Carbine%2025-20%2001_zpsk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The mark the ring leaves gives your firearm character. The TD carbine had a ring for the sling which went over the cavalrymans shoulder and the carbine was shoved down into a boot which was fastened to the saddle. This kept the carbine from flopping around when at a trot or gallop. The boot is about 10-12 inches long. With a thong in the ring one can hook the thong over the saddle horn witch means your firearm is carried crossways between you and the fork. Very unhandy . The cavalry sling was meant for mounted use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P.S. The cinch rings were sometimes used as a running iron for branding; not the carbine saddle ring

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.