Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Caliope Cupcake #13981

Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution

Recommended Posts

"Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth."

"A free people ought not only to be armed and disciplined, but they should have sufficient arms and ammunition to maintain a status of independence from any who might attempt to abuse them, which would include their own government."

- George Washington

 

"The Constitution of most of our states (and of the United States) assert that all power is inherent in the people; that they may exercise it by themselves; that it is their right and duty to be at all times armed."

- Thomas Jefferson

 

"To disarm the people is the most effectual way to enslave them."

- George Mason

 

"Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom of Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of the people are armed, and constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops that can be, on any pretence, raised in the United States."

--Noah Webster, An Examination of the Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution, 1787

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth."

"A free people ought not only to be armed and disciplined, but they should have sufficient arms and ammunition to maintain a status of independence from any who might attempt to abuse them, which would include their own government."

- George Washington

 

"The Constitution of most of our states (and of the United States) assert that all power is inherent in the people; that they may exercise it by themselves; that it is their right and duty to be at all times armed."

- Thomas Jefferson

 

"To disarm the people is the most effectual way to enslave them."

- George Mason

 

"Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom of Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of the people are armed, and constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops that can be, on any pretence, raised in the United States."

--Noah Webster, An Examination of the Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution, 1787

 

Yep! But all of the above is ignored or dismissed as musings of old men by the Great Privy of Profiteers in DC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had to push that button, didn't you? ;) I'll add some, starting back a bit before the Founders.

 

"For men of understanding do not say that the sword is to blame for murder, nor wine for drunkenness, nor strength for outrage, nor courage for foolhardiness, but they lay the blame on those who make an improper use of the gifts which have been bestowed upon them by God, and punish them accordingly. "

ssS

-- St. John Chrysostom

 

The prohibition is general. No clause in the constitution could by any rule of construction be conceived to give congress a power to disarm the people. Such a flagitious attempt could only be made under some general pretence by a state legislature. But if in any blind pursuit of inordinate power, either should attempt it, this amendment may be appealed to as a restraint on both.

Wm. Rawles, ""A View of the Constitution of the United States of America" (1829) - used as the textbook for Constitutional Law at West Point.

 

A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks.

--- Thomas Jefferson to Peter Carr, 1785.

 

[W]hereas, to preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them; nor does it follow from this, that all promiscuously must go into actual service on every occasion. The mind that aims at a select militia, must be influenced by a truly anti-republican principle; and when we see many men disposed to practice upon it, whenever they can prevail, no wonder true republicans are for carefully guarding against it.

---Richard Henry Lee, The Pennsylvania Gazette, Feb. 20, 1788

 

Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story (appointed by James Madison in 1811):

"The importance of this article [the Second Amendment] will scarcely be doubted by any persons, who have duly reflected upon the subject. The militia is the natural defence of a free country against sudden foreign invasions, domestic insurrections, and domestic usurpations of power by rulers." [emphasis added]

---Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States, CHAPTER XLIV, AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION

 

That's it for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.

Thomas Jefferson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More from Jefferson:

 

“Laws that forbid the carrying of arms...disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes... Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.” (Quoting Cesare Beccaria)

 

"The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it."

 

"What country can preserve its liberties if its rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance?"

 

"The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions that I wish it to be always kept alive. It will often be exercised when wrong, but better so than not to be exercised at all."

 

I was having lunch in law school with my Constitutional Law professor, and a discussion about firearms and gun control came up. He was what I would call "mildly" ant-gun, in that he didn't understand a desire for high capacity magazines and being from New York, had the indoctrinated concern about the use of guns in crime. He was willing to listen and discuss, however. I mentioned an article he had written for a journal, in which he discussed the fact that inherent in the American psyche is a certain amount of rebelliousness. Quoting the Declaration of Independence (more Jefferson), I asked him if he truly thought that Americans had a right and a duty to throw off a despotic government if necessary. When he said he did, I simply asked "shouldn't we have the means to do so?" He nodded and said something to the effect of "That is an important consideration. Most troubling for the anti-gun side."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is an expanded Beccaria quote:

 

"False is the idea of utility that sacrifices a thousand real advantages for one imaginary or trifling inconvenience; that would take fire from men because it burns, and water because one may drown in it; that has no remedy for evils except destruction. The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.

 

Can it be supposed that those who have the courage to violate the most sacred laws of humanity, the most important of the code, will respect the less important and arbitrary ones, which can be violated with ease and impunity, and which, if strictly obeyed, would put an end to personal liberty... and subject innocent persons to all the vexations that the guilty alone ought to suffer?

 

Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man. They ought to be designated as laws not preventive but fearful of crimes, produced by the tumultuous impression of a few isolated facts, and not by thoughtful consideration of the inconveniences and advantages of a universal decree."

 

I suspect that the words St. John Chrysostom in my post above may have been influenced by Seneca: “A sword is never a killer, it is a tool in the killer's hands”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.