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1894 SRC 32-20 booger


Dirty Doc, SASS #18176

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:FlagAm: Two things in a short period getting me back in the saddle (hopefully). A friend sold a load of firewood and accepted a 92 Chinrester 32WCF SRC in payment for same when the purchaser could not come up with the cash. I converted the SRC into twice the price of the firewood. Another old friend talked me out of my 92 32WCF rifle & wants to get into the game. The rifle I sold had a pristine bore. The SRC has a pristine bore but for one rust booger 4 inches down from the muzzle. I am getting tennis elbow from scrubbing with various famous solvents with a coated rod. Booger will not move. HOW do you remove a rust booger so that the lead doesnt build up behind it. I have shot 10 or so jacketed rounds between cleanings. I have the Outers Lead-out and Copper-out, but they don't have a "Rust-out." Any help appreciated. Oh yea. In ref to last post, I still have a few thou 32WCF bullets from Allstar. Thanks for the input. Doc :FlagAm:
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You could work some J&G bore compound over the rust spot. This spot sounds like it is deep enough that you have actual pits, though. You should shoot it for accuracy with typical lead bullet loads before going crazy over the pits. It may work very well, and not be all that tough to clean.

 

If you are still dissatisfied, then:

* You might have enough barrel to shorten and recrown.

* You could reline the barrel - maybe $300 or a little more. Would probably be my choice, if the rusted barrel just won't shoot or it leads quickly.

* You could have it rebarreled for a little more.

 

But then, you probably knew all this.

 

Inspecting with a borescope might give you the data yo need to make a good decision. Talk to a GOOD local gunsmith - he's probably got one that he'll let you peek at the spot with.

 

Good luck, GJ

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Try firelapping it with 20 or so rounds and view results.

Sounds like the short term try. The carbine is all original and really nice, so I would probably want to wait on alterations of the basic piece. I had Redman's re-bore a beater 73 in 38WCF with fantasy results, so I know the possibilities. I shoots very well at 25 yards with the occasional flyer, but those will probably go away with familiarity and early in the day shooting (before the eyes get fuzzy). I assume "firelapping is with an abrasive like valve lapping paste? Doc

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I would only shoot Oregon Trails hardcast bullets in a barrel that had such an issue. If I had to shoot softer bullets, I would keep an eye on that spot between stages to make sure that no lead was built up.

I would look for another barrel before I would be willing to cut the original. Numrich, Gunbroker, E-bay or Dixie Gunworks are likely sources. The original could always be reinstalled, unaltered, if you wanted to sell the gun.

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I've had varying degrees of success using a bullet and lapping compound.

 

Drive the bullet into the barrel to engrave the rifling onto the bullet. Drill and tap the bullet for your ramrod. Start with #400 lapping compound spread generously on the bullet. Then work the bullet back and forth through the rusty area 20 or 30 times. Clean out the mess and inspect. Repeat with the #800 lapping compound.

 

You might have to use several bullets this way to get the results you want. If the rust has pitted the barrel, you'll never get it out and relining or rebarreling is your next step.

 

Disclaimer: I'm not a gunsmith and don't guarantee that this will work. It has worked for me on a couple of old guns.

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Another idea would be to leave the barrel at 20" and have the muzzle end opened to .4"-.45" of an open bore down past the point of the 'booger'. This would retain the looks of the rifle and provide clean rifling contact only for the round. I'm not sure what cleaning would be like, but it would take a lot of build up to affect the precision or accuracy.

I would think that a good gunsmith to get this done for well under $100.

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