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Cheyenne Culpepper 32827

When is a pistol considered holstered?

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Some may remember a post this past summer I wrote asking what's the call for holtering a cocked pistol, if the hand hadn't left the pistol.

 

the roc in the past had considered it not holstered if the hand was still on the pistol, but it isn't written, could we have a clarification?

 

cpbc

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Some may remember a post this past summer I wrote asking what's the call for holtering a cocked pistol, if the hand hadn't left the pistol.

 

the roc in the past had considered it not holstered if the hand was still on the pistol, but it isn't written, could we have a clarification?

 

cpbc

 

There has been NO CHANGE to that ruling.

A revolver is NOT considered "HOLSTERED" in the context of that rule until it is released.

HOWEVER, penalties for UNsafe firearm handling and/or 170º violations may still apply (w/exceptions for the180º allowance)

 

REF also:

 

Revolver in hand – when the muzzle of the revolver clears the mouth of the holster, or breaks contact with a prop where it was staged.

RO1 p.30

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thanks wolf, not many people know that,,,,tha's why I posted it here.

 

pb

 

now, back to tiling the bathroom

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It has been my understanding that if the muzzle of the revolver has entered the holster, then the shooter is allowed to turn away from the line without risking a 170 violation even though the revolver is not completely seated in the holster (hand still on gun). Is that correct?

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It has been my understanding that if the muzzle of the revolver has entered the holster, then the shooter is allowed to turn away from the line without risking a 170 violation even though the revolver is not completely seated in the holster (hand still on gun). Is that correct?

 

YES

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unsafe gun handling, is putting revolver in holster while cocked and hand still on it unsafe gun handling?

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unsafe gun handling, is putting revolver in holster while cocked and hand still on it unsafe gun handling?

yup

specially if it has a live round in it still

and who is to know for sure

 

but just watch

mileage will vary

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I know we try our hardest not to hand out DQs and safety violations BUT sometimes the level of danger in an act does rise to a level that requires stricter interpretations of the rules and in this case I think we have arrived there plus some. If a brain fade goes this far, who is to say that the finger just might be in that trigger guard also and brother there isnt but one outcome when we start to allow so many unsafe stack-ups to occur, all in the name of not wanting to embarrass someone! If a shooter is aware to the point of knowing a round isnt left in the gun then he should surely be at a point of awareness that would prevent holstering it in a cocked condition. The safety cone would be very hard to call in most cases BUT by golly when a cocked gun gets shoved into a holster it would certainly be an easy call there and I would feel less safe knowing a hand is still on that gun, to be honest. This situation warrants a very loud wake-up call.

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Palewolf,,,,?

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The assessment of a SDQ for "unsafe firearm handling" (REF: RO1 p.25) would depend entirely on the shooter's actions in making the revolver safe.

 

Best case scenario would be that the T/O is WATCHING THE GUN at all times & notices that the shooter has cocked for a 6th shot (which is the most common reason for attempting to holster/restage a cocked revolver); and is able to STOP the shooter & assist/direct in making the firearm SAFE in an acceptable manner

(e.g. NOT allowing the shooter to "dry-fire" or DECOCK into the holster)

...THAT would DEFINITELY be considered "unsafe firearm handing" IMO.

 

BTW - Stopping the shooter to remedy the situation would be considered PROPER COACHING and NOT grounds for a RESHOOT.

 

Muzzle control while holstering/redrawing must also be taken into account regarding a break of the 170º (cocked or not)...which might also result in a SDQ.

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would that same situation, but with a round in the gun denifinately be UGH? (unsafe gun handling) kind of appropriate UGH!

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So for a penalty concerning a hammer cocked, a gun is considered holstered when the hand releases the pistol?? For penalties for breaking any angle rules (ie, 170, 180, etc) a gun is considered holstered when the tip of the barrel is inside the holster (no matter if gun is being drawn or holstered)????

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So for a penalty concerning a hammer cocked, a gun is considered holstered when the hand releases the pistol?? For penalties for breaking any angle rules (ie, 170, 180, etc) a gun is considered holstered when the tip of the barrel is inside the holster (no matter if gun is being drawn or holstered)????

You got to allow the shooter to draw the pistol from holster, even thou the 170 is ever so slightly broken.. i guess that goes for reholstering too. if shooter doesn't get wild with his draw/reholster process/angle, then he is good to go.

 

This subject appears to be a personal opinion call and we know how that goes,,, BOD goes to the shooter,,,,

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straight hang holsters are the only ones that get a break on the 170,

 

 

I'm trying to get an official "call" on putting a cocked loaded pistol in holster WITHOUT taking your hand off of it...........

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