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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/07/2019 in Posts

  1. 3 points
    I made this comment to a veterinary client of mine who drew cartoons for calendars and magazines. A week later he gave me this cartoon as a momento.
  2. 2 points
    The campground we use is the Sale of Champions Campground in Shelbyville. I will talk to Ray and tell him he may want to leave the full campground open until after the match. He normally closes half of the grounds.
  3. 1 point
    Tyrel, glad Branchwater answered, looks like rooms are going fast. Randy
  4. 1 point
    Hiya OLG, In the first post “At 14 months I received one back and was told the other two would follow soon and things had been delayed and that this was not normal. “ Thanks BC
  5. 1 point
    It is just ridiculous to ask somebody to wait that long to get their gun/s back. I waited a year to get some specialty work done on a vintage Winchester by a man mentioned in a previous post. He was the Tops in the field, but he told me up front that it would be as least that long and he didn't have me send the gun until he was ready for it. It was work that I didn't feel qualified to do myself. I believe that the long waits have been one of the reasons that many have taken up the reins and learned to do some of their own work. The cost is not usually more than the work is worth, IMO. Of course some Big Name smiths do get a pretty penny for their work and do have long wait times. In many cases a lesser know Smith might well be worth giving a try. A good deal of the most common and basic work needed on the guns used in our game is doable by the Layman. Most of it is little more than disassembly and minor fitting of replacing parts. There is a lot of "How to" material available on line. Moving up the ladder into custom modifications requires a bit more finesse and experience and of course some of the work, especially machining and such require the services of a professional level person. I found a man that I like. Texas has 146,873 Gunsmiths, +/- , he is one of them. Many of the really good Smiths have the same problem, turn around time. Also... a good number of the talented Smiths are just getting OLD. They have health issues and end up falling behind in the work that they take in. It is difficult for some of them to admit that it is either time to stop or limit the amount of work that they take in. Snakebite
  6. 1 point
    Just got back in town from a business trip and figured it was time to give an update. The second of my three 97’s has been completed and shipped back. It is scheduled to arrive Tuesday. I have been told that the third is almost ready to test fire and also be returned. I’m looking forward to receiving them and giving them a run. I will give an update on the work and performance of the second one after I try it out. I will also keep everyone posted on the return of number three. Thanks BC
  7. 1 point
    There is also a microtel in Shelbyville. It was close to booked up last I looked.
  8. 1 point
    Nice! Thanks For the tip Branchwater.
  9. 1 point
  10. 1 point
    Doc Ward was up early, having not slept well after the events of the night before. Several times he had drifted off, only to have nightmares of events past he had hoped were buried wake him up. Getting dressed, he walked the distance from his house past the horse pasture to the livery stable. Looking around, he decided to give the horses fresh water, grain and hay, and see if Mary made it in to clean stalls. She'd had a rough night, so if she didn't make it in, he would take care of it later and let the horses out to pasture. Finishing, he hurried out of the barn before he started coughing and wheezing. Cleaning himself off, he walked over to the jail. Stepping foot inside, Doc smiled to see the Sheriff up and at his desk, although he still showed the effects of the brutal beating he had taken. "Feeling better?" Doc asked. Sheriff Cody shrugged and responded, "A bit, but i'm tired of laying about. You looked jumpy as a cat last night, all coiled energy ready to explode. Today you look like you haven't slept. Everything OK?" Doc nodded, commenting "Yeah, it was a long night." He didn't offer anything more, and Cody decided not to ask. Instead he gestured toward the cell that Gardner dozed in. "When they dragged him in here last night, I thought he was dead. By the sound of it, the old man is going to have one heckuva headache. I didn't ask last night what you thought he should be charged with. He'll probably want to know when he wakes up." Doc took his hat off, and ran his fingers through his hair absent-mindedly as he thought. "Heck, you're the professional lawman. Battery for grabbing Mary? Disturbing the Peace? Not Obeying an Officer of the Law? I'm sure there's something." Cody nodded. "I'll think about it, but most everything would be worthy of a fine, not jail time." At Doc's surprised look, the Sheriff lifted a hand. "Not saying you did the wrong thing, it sounds like you did a smart job of defusing an ugly situation. Speaking of, I've already had a couple of visitors this morning. Seamus and Kay stopped in on their way to the store. Said you backed those men of his right up, but that you were somewhat..." The Sheriff looked for the right word, not wanting to offend Doc, "Intense." Cody could tell he had at least hit a small nerve from the way Doc's face flushed a little and he averted his gaze. "Everything alright? Is there anything you want to talk about?" Glancing back, Doc smiled a weak smile and shook his head. "No, but I appreciate it. I'm fine." Off in the distance, both men could hear the sound of thunder and the wind picking up.
  11. 1 point
    Once you slap gold on a gun, I kind of lose interest.
  12. 1 point
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    The late Harry Pope master barrel maker had this sign posted in his shop. He had more work than he could handle. NO DELIVERY PROMISED. TAKE YOUR WORK WHEN DONE OR TAKE IT ELSEWHERE. IF YOU MUST KNOW WHEN I WILL BE THROUGH WITH YOUR WORK THE ANSWER IS NOW. TAKE YOUR WORK AWAY. I DON’T WANT IT. I HAVE NO WAY OF KNOWING WHEN I WILL BE THROUGH. I WORK ELEVEN HOURS A DAY. DAILY INTERRUPTIONS AVERAGE ONE AND ONE-HALF HOURS. DARK WEATHER SETS ME BACK STILL MORE. THERE IS BUT ONE OF ME. I’M HUMAN AND I’M TIRED. I REFUSE TO LONGER BE WORRIED BY PROMISES THAT CIRCUMSTANCES DO NOT ALLOW ME TO KEEP. YOU’RE A LONG TIME DEAD. IT IS TIME TO BEGIN TO LIVE.
  16. 1 point
    On things I can't do myself, I deal with Three Cut. He tells you where you are in his list. Anything he's done has been in the ballpark of what he told me. There are no favors. As he does one, he picks the next one in line. He tells you where you stand when you ask. I had a 97 that about every 20 rounds would not cleanly eject. Intermittent faults are the hardest to fix. I got it back yesterday and everything I shot with it ejected cleanly to 4 to 6 feet away from the SG. Well worth the short wait and the cost. And he doesn't accept payment until the job is complete.
  17. 1 point
    And this is why I do all my own work. There's something going on with this guy and he should have stepped up the communication.
  18. 1 point
    The next scheduled update is January 2020.
  19. 0 points
    Looks like a hour and 45min. drive for us each day, and no banquet
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