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Charlie Plasters, SASS#60943

Air brush

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After seeing several air brushes for sale on classifieds a while back I got the urge to get one. I  have no justification for buying one I just want one! But what do I need? Gravity feed or siphon, single or dual trigger etc etc. Help please.

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I use a Paasche H for model building. Mine is siphon feed, single trigger. It does everything I want it to do, because I am far from being an advanced modeler. It is also easier to take apart and clean than some of the better ones that have the needles in them.

 

You will also want to look at a decent compressor with a moisture trap.

 

Just remember, if there is a Hobby Lobby nearby, you can print out a coupon good for 40% off any one item. 

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26 minutes ago, Abilene Slim SASS 81783 said:

I’ve experience with both modeler’s and artist‘s brushes. What would you like to paint?

I don't know what I will use it for.  Painting decorative picture frames antiquing.  Motorcycle tank . Etc

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1 hour ago, Charlie Plasters, SASS#60943 said:

I don't know what I will use it for.  Painting decorative picture frames antiquing.  Motorcycle tank . Etc

+ 1 to what Doc said on single trigger set ups. They're also easy to set up your spray pattern for consistent coverage. Very important for even coverage with a soft edge such as camo patterns on models and relatively large areas like picture frames and motorcycle tanks as you describe. The siphon feed allows larger volumes of paint for bigger projects than gravity-feed cups.

 

The advantage of a dual trigger set up is it allows you to vary your coverage within the same stroke. Let's say you want to paint a line that is thin on the ends, but thicker in the middle. The dual trigger allows you to do that in one pass, where the single trigger would require multiple passes, and probably unsatisfactory results. However, the dual trigger has a somewhat steep learning curve and requires more dexterity than a single trigger because you have to manage airflow and paint coverage at the same time. What I like about it is that it's infinitely variable within one pass. A gravity feed cup holds a relatively small volume of paint, but allows better balance and control of the airbrush -- more like a pencil or artist's brush. I used mine for illustration, where my single trigger was better for crafts and modeling.

 

As Doc said, a good compressor is essential. Most are of the diaphragm type which means they have no storage tank and are pumping air directly to the airbrush. As the compressed (and heated) air travels through the hose, it cools and condenses downstream which produces moisture in the line. The result is an unexpected splat of water onto your nice project. I use two in-line filters to trap the moisture before it gets to the airbrush.

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

 

Edited by Abilene Slim SASS 81783
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2 hours ago, Abilene Slim SASS 81783 said:

+ 1 to what Doc said on single trigger set ups. They're also easy to set up your spray pattern for consistent coverage. Very important for even coverage with a soft edge such as camo patterns on models and relatively large areas like picture frames and motorcycle tanks as you describe. The siphon feed allows larger volumes of paint for bigger projects than gravity-feed cups.

 

The advantage of a dual trigger set up is it allows you to vary your coverage within the same stroke. Let's say you want to paint a line that is thin on the ends, but thicker in the middle. The dual trigger allows you to do that in one pass, where the single trigger would require multiple passes, and probably unsatisfactory results. However, the dual trigger has a somewhat steep learning curve and requires more dexterity than a single trigger because you have to manage airflow and paint coverage at the same time. What I like about it is that it's infinitely variable within one pass. A gravity feed cup holds a relatively small volume of paint, but allows better balance and control of the airbrush -- more like a pencil or artist's brush. I used mine for illustration, where my single trigger was better for crafts and modeling.

 

As Doc said, a good compressor is essential. Most are of the diaphragm type which means they have no storage tank and are pumping air directly to the airbrush. As the compressed (and heated) air travels through the hose, it cools and condenses downstream which produces moisture in the line. The result is an unexpected splat of water onto your nice project. I use two in-line filters to trap the moisture before it gets to the airbrush.

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

 

Thanks that helps alot.

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