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Juan Solo

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About Juan Solo

  • Birthday October 16

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  • SASS #
    107410
  • SASS Affiliated Club
    Antelope Junction Rangers

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Tampa. FL

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  1. Another thing to check is that your primers are actually being fully seated. My hornady LnL had the primer seat start wearing in to the soft aluminum body. I had to jb weld on a steel square where it was contacting the body of the press and now my primers seat fully again and my light strike issues went away.
  2. I'm assuming it was only 2 shells, and he said SxS could do it as well. If it was more than 2, then yeah thats a pretty big disadvantage
  3. I can agree with the above load, I often used 3.6-3.8 of trail boss under anything between 160 and 200gr bullets and got great results out of c45s. The c45s is just a rimmed 45 acp, so it should be comparable
  4. I'm with rambling, most likely someone jammed something in there to advance a stuck cylinder. Unless you are seeing any issues with timing, id shoot it as is.
  5. if thats 450 shipped from ffl to ffl i'll take it
  6. Correct, the dirtiness of trailboss in the 45 is that most of us are running it lower pressure than needed to seal so you get blow back. I never minded it though, cleans up plenty easy.
  7. I also used citristrip. Took about 4 applications, and i did need a bit of sanding to get all the red out, but it was literally just 400 grit and a few passes. After that I stained it, filled the grain with a sanded in tru oil finish, and gave it a final few coats of tru oil. Came out amazing.
  8. Even with magnum primers you've found light trailboss erratic? I'm about .7 of a grain lower than the minimum with 200gr at the crimp and consistent as can be. Dirty for sure, but no consistency issues. I do use magnum primers and a firm roll crimp though so maybe I'm just lucky.
  9. 5.5 is not a really light load by any stretch so this is more likely a powder drop that isn't dropping it consistently. I like TB but I hate how inconsistent it's been known to be out of powder drops. If you don't already have a powder checker die, get the hornady one. It doesn't lock out the press but if you set it up right you can catch .1gr variation in powder pretty easily. P.S. for the person asking about magnum primers, on light loads in big cases, the magnum primer flame gives more consistent ignition and less position sensitivity
  10. I have the eliminator 8's which are basically the octogon and bigger grip version of the guns above and they are a dream. For 1000 bucks i'd jump on those above if i wasnt already shooting more or less the same thing
  11. I loved to play well below the minimum chargers on revolvers and i got a pretty good load out of C45s with 3 grains TB under a 160. That gave me enough cushion for the natural trail boss variances in drops in a progressive with out ever being worried about being too light. Realistically you can just work up your own though pretty simply since short of not putting any powder in the case you will almost always at least get out of the barrel of a 4,75 or even 5.5 revolver. Start at the minimum load, then just step down about .2 grains. Make 5 at each step, when you start seeing backed out primers, or you get keyholing, or inconsistent ingnition you've reached your floor. Move up to the step above that and call it good. Another thing, since we are playing with low pressure, its gonna be dirty cause the cases wont seal the chambers effectively, and use coated bullets to avoid leading.
  12. My 2 eliminators required a bit of work with one being out of time a bit. Once I got that cleaned up they've been excellent work horses. Probably a couple thousand out of each and not a single misfire even.
  13. If anything it just makes the carrier that much lighter. This is a great deal, unmilled carriers are near impossible to find and when you do it's 50+ for it. For 60 you are getting a lot of mill work for less than 10 bucks.
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