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Aunt Jen

Is it Just Style?

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Oh. Maybe the Jetta doesn't need DEF because it meets emissions regardless. ??

 

http://ask.cars.com/2012/11/why-do-some-volkswagen-diesels-use-adblue-and-others-do-not.html

Like I was saying last night, Jetta's and several other light auto diesels still run clean enough with older emission control devices that they don't require DEF.

 

And if you do choose a heavier car, even though that would defeat some of the purpose of trading in a Prius, VW dealer will take care of the DEF top off when you take it in for scheduled servicing. (Oil changes, etc.)

 

If you have to add it yourself, it's no more difficult than adding oil or coolant. Not to mention the recommended interval for adding or changing oil to most of our current vehicles is less than the 10k miles VW advertises for DEF consumption.

 

When we looked at VW's a year or more ago, it seems to me that the warranty and service free stuff was a longer lasting package than what was mentioned in your link.

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In summary,

 

Jetti TDI seems to be the only current diesel passenger car that doesn't require the DEF additive.

 

Any larger modern diesel car/truck needs the additive.

 

The DEF additive is stored in a separate tank somewhere on the vehicle and is metered into the exhaust system by the vehicles computer/fueling system. About as easy to refill as filling up your windshield washer fluid bottle. Probably do not need to refill tank at every fuel stop.

 

At least on PU trucks and larger,, if you run out of the DEF, the engine drops back to about an ideal speed and will not rev up until tank is filled.

 

DEF cost approximate $7.50 per gallon as someone posted AutoZone site. A gallon (3%?) will be consumed in approximate 33 gallons of diesel. Guessing the tank will hold a gallon.

 

turbo's cost a lot to replace and for best turbo life, warm them up, cool them down, minimize short trips. Just saying. But if you don't plan on keeping the car long, who cares?

 

Buyer will pay a premium price for a diesel model vehicle vs a similar gasser. In PU trucks, it could be a $7k addition.

 

in the last decade or so, highway diesel fuel cost approximate 10-15% more than regular gas.

 

Diesel fuel is rather easy to find anywhere in the USA. Nothing to worry about.

 

You have to drive a diesel a little different that a gasser,,,, the torque curve thingy.

 

I would think twice about purchasing a regular driver diesel powered vehicle in the extreme cold parts of the country (Michigan, N. Dakota, Montana, etc).

 

BTW, I own a 16 YO Ram2500 with the Cummin's and enjoy it but know its strengths and weaknesses.

 

Blastmaster

 

Edit: It is true, diesel motors last a loooong time, but generally, the rest of the car ( transmission, steering, AC, and so forth) falls apart,,,, or gets wrecked, or traded off for just because.. My Honda has 200k on the gas motor w/o repairs other than routing maintenance and one timing belt replacement. How much more will it go? YMMV :)

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Coking the bearings in turbos isn't quite the problem it used to be.

 

Some of that is oil technology, some of it is manf getting tired of replacing turbos under warranty and improving bearings/housings.

 

Either way, by the time any off the three diesel pickups we have are off the road and into a parking spot, the gauges indicate less than 400 degrees F between the manifold and turbo.

 

Only exceptions are following heavy throttle events, towing, etc.

 

And even back in high school, playing with hot rod gas engines, it was a bad idea to shut down right after a heavy throttle event.

 

No matter what you drive, if you're driving it hard, let it run a bit before you shut it down. Coking can occur anywhere between the mains and the valve train.

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Coking the bearings in turbos isn't quite the problem it used to be.

 

Some of that is oil technology, some of it is manf getting tired of replacing turbos under warranty and improving bearings/housings.

 

Either way, by the time any off the three diesel pickups we have are off the road and into a parking spot, the gauges indicate less than 400 degrees F between the manifold and turbo.

 

Only exceptions are following heavy throttle events, towing, etc.

 

And even back in high school, playing with hot rod gas engines, it was a bad idea to shut down right after a heavy throttle event.

 

No matter what you drive, if you're driving it hard, let it run a bit before you shut it down. Coking can occur anywhere between the mains and the valve train.

True, true,true.

 

However, for a run around grocery getter compact car, not having a turbo would/could be a benift. Just something else to malfunction and would cost a lot to fix. Of course, a diesel w/o a turbo would be a real dog to drive and probably not make emissions,

 

another thing I noticed in reading the VW propaganda was the highly stated mpg was with a manual transmission and was in the low 40's mpg. not that much greater than the same model but with gas. The auto transmissions were about 2mpg less.

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True, true,true.

 

However, for a run around grocery getter compact car, not having a turbo would/could be a benift. Just something else to malfunction and would cost a lot to fix. Of course, a diesel w/o a turbo would be a real dog to drive and probably not make emissions,

 

another thing I noticed in reading the VW propaganda was the highly stated mpg was with a manual transmission and was in the low 40's mpg. not that much greater than the same model but with gas. The auto transmissions were about 2mpg less.

True enough, and if you can drive a manual, there's ways to do even better.

 

I might be bias toward diesels, but it's just so much easier to get consistent good mileage out of them.

 

Especially the new ones, with nothing but a flash tune.

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I was working for a vending co. some years ago and ran out of fuel in a diesel powered truck. Oh boy, not as easy as running out of gas with a conventional vehicle! They had to bleed the lines free before they could add fuel. it took a while to do that. In the meantime they brought another truck and we transferred all the stuff I had so I could get on with my route! I don't know if all diesels are like that but this was a new 1986 Iveco truck. Nightmare!!

 

Rye

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Newer models aren't using mechanical injection pumps.

 

Most run a common rail system these days, with a high pressure injection pump and an electronic feed pump.

 

It's not kind to run them outa fuel, but they'll start back up when you refill them.

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Not uncommon to have to 'bleed' the fuel rail on a gasser with FI, when it runs dry either.

Easy to do-Tricky to keep from get'n a fuel shower.

OLG

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