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War Grizzly

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    105071
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    Paradise Pass

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  1. I have loaded with all three of the powders you listed. All work fine. Pick your poison. I chose Clays because I'm cheap and it burns clean enough. If I want to step up the power a bit then universal or unique are better suited. I used to hunt with 44wcf 200 grain jacketed and a stiff load of unique. Most accurate hunting load. Best plinking load I found was a book minimum charge of Clays.
  2. Guns, ammo, water. The truck or car is normally very close to the range. If it's further to the truck then I'll grab a screwdriver set although I've never needed anything. It's not that nothing has ever went wrong for me but during those times it wasn't something I was going to fix on the range anyway. It's more feasible just to grab a backup gun out of the vehicle or borrow something to finish the match. I have considered adding a shotgun chamber swab to the cart but haven't found the perfect one for me and so I run without. I may add some hand wipes to the cart because I like to eat an apple or whatever to keep me level, and I'm increasingly more paranoid about lead. It is during practice sessions that I determine what I need. When I used to shoot a Marlin I knew that I needed to carry a screwdriver because the screw came loose during practice.
  3. I count my brass cost as depreciating about 80% per loading. That's basically because I lose about that much whether it be shooting at home or at a match. This makes my cost per round closer to $0.14 for 45 and 38/40. That's 3.5 primer. 1.5 powder 7 bullet 2 brass. This math accounts for brass lasting 14 loadings. I very rarely need to discard brass because it has split. I've considered making provisions to capture more of my brass at home but have never spent the time to do it. I buy brass 2000 cases at a time and shoot that until I end up with a pile that looks like about 500 then order more. This method I believe results in a reasonable balance that minimizes time spent reloading and policing brass while maximizing time spent shooting. I do sort my loaded cases before a match looking for any dents, splits, or high primers, but I do not run a match bucket and a practice bucket.
  4. That's exactly the sort of info I was looking for. Kinda figured it was along those lines. I have some early gen short stroke links and some spare factory parts so I should be good to go. I've got to get deer season out of the way and then hopefully I'll tackle this on Thanksgiving weekend. Thanks a million
  5. Myself, I wouldn't worry much about it. If you cut the half cock notch "properly" so that the trigger can't be pulled then the trigger itself must reset further than if the hammer simply has an extra notch cut at a more positive angle for the half cock position. In other words the trigger moves farther forward in the gun with the properly cut half cock. This is exacerbated in a short stroke because there isn't enough real estate on the hammer to allow for a smooth transition into half cock. Many short strokes are done exactly as yours are. It is good to be aware that careless handling at the load table could result in a discharge. This topic was discussed just a few months ago if memory serves me well.
  6. I'm looking for general information on what is typically done when a rifle is short stroked by the cut, bend, weld technique. I have a new Uberti 1873 rifle and I'm considering going this route instead of buying new toggle links. For better or worse, I do my own gun work as part of what I enjoy about the sport and have my own machine shop. I've been able to short stroke my Rugers with good results by simply looking at pictures online but I can't seem to find anything showing what has been modified on Uberti rifles. I'm not looking for detailed specifics nor am I looking to work on anyone else's gun. I realize that this approach is not the cheapest and it will not result in the world's greatest rifle. Any help especially pictures would be much appreciated.
  7. I purchased two pairs a few months ago. One set was good to go with a fit that is acceptable. On the second set, the ferrule pulled through the thin backing rendering them useless. I would blame my install, but I do not feel I overtightened the screw. I'm certain they would send me a replacement; however, I won't bother with it as I don't like feel of the set that remains. They are slightly thinner than factory grips but where they differ from Eagle grips is in their contour. The Alt are more rounded whereas the Eagle have a flatter profile. I prefer the Eagle, but dang that price tag is tough to swallow for a pair of production grips.
  8. Smokestack, do you have a picture of your bandolier? I've considered going to one myself. I assume that a good design is cut to the contour of the shooters shoulder.
  9. None yet. My Rugers that see this treatment most often are stainless, but I've used it in my Uberti 1873 with no ill effect. I use acetone and or alcohol to degrease guns prior to touchup bluing all the time with good results and no harm to surrounding surfaces. I've not tried it on the painted alloy grip frames. The main advantage to Ed's Red type concoctions in my experience is that it is cheap and makes submersion cleaning much more feasible. I do not advocate submersion without fully stripping the gun because this I think invites crude to accumulate in cavities.
  10. I've recently started using this as I have a use for all the constituent ingredients already. It's cheap enough that I made a batch that fills a half gallon Pyrex container. I simply take the grips off and drop my pistols in. Then I will disassemble them completely and wipe off the extra. I have noticed that powder fouling comes out easier. As to lead, I still use mxt cowboy blend for heavily leaded bores.
  11. Any monthly match at Paradise Pass. My schedule doesn't allow me to attend every month, and I make excuses for not making it when I probably could have attended. The price is cheap. The stages are well written. Brass rats are top notch. Competition is as fierce as you want it to be so pick your category carefully. Mostly, it is the people that make it my favorite shoot. I was gone from the game for over a decade and when I attended my first match back there were cowboys there that said, "welcome back."
  12. I nominate Sixgun Seamus. I shot CC for the first time this year at Indiana State and had the great fortune of being assigned to his posse. He was an excellent posse marshall and he went out of his way to talk shop with me about what has and hasn't worked for him while shooting CC. I came away from that experience knowing that I had found a home in the CC category. I look forward to competing with him for many years to come.
  13. I nominate Sixgun Seamus. I shot CC for the first time this year at Indiana State and had the great fortune of being assigned to his posse. He was an excellent posse marshall and he went out of his way to talk shop with me about what has and hasn't worked for him while shooting CC. I came away from that experience knowing that I had found a home in the CC category. I look forward to competing with him for many years to come.
  14. Have you tried calling Ruger? It's been a couple of years since I've bought them, but in the past I've been able to buy directly from Ruger. If memory serves me I was limited to 2 per month.
  15. I've had success with a heavy charge of Unique under 200gr XTP. I consider it an ethical hunting cartridge out to 140yds. After that accuracy falls apart and energy drops too low for bullet performance.
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