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!875 Remington question


DMiller

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I have a question to all those that shoot 1875 Remington's and their clones. Do the originals or Uberti's or EMF copies have the strain screw located on the front strap? If so do you have to tighten them down or just adjust them to get proper primer hit? The reason I ask is I recently picked up a Hartford Armory 1875. I absolutely love the gun but noticed I was getting light primer hits. So light that the round would not go off and the dimple was very shallow. I adjusted the strain screw in until I was getting better primer hits and all rounds were going off. Problem is if I screw the strain screw in too far the mainspring will fall off the rear of the hammer. To correct I have to remove the grips, loosen the strain screw and with pressure get the mainspring back under the hammer. I have a S & W revolver with a strain screw and it is either loose or tight. If I tighten it down there is no issue with the spring coming off. I have also been told that the S&W strain screw is not an adjustment it is suppose to be tightened.

Thanks for any info

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Howdy

 

You are correct about the S&W strain screw. It is supposed to be tightened all the way. You can turn one out a quarter turn or so, but if you turn it out too far the spring takes a shape that does not allow it to function properly. It interferes with the internal geometry of the grip.

 

I can't tell you too much about the spring on your Hartford Armory. I have shot them, but I have never taken one apart. I understand what you are saying about tightening the spring too much, you are changing the geometry of the spring, in effect you are shortening it so that it no longer fits in the proscribed space. I wonder if perhaps someone ground it down to lighten it? That could be causing the problem. If the spring now has less energy when it is bent, and if you need more energy, you might be bending it a bit too far for the space it is supposed to occupy.

 

You might try calling Hartford Armory and seeing if they have any extra springs they can send you.

 

Hartford Armory

 

Or you might give Taylors a call, Hartford says Taylors is their sole distributor.

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I would contact Hartford but they are no longer producing these and appear to not be responding to emails or phone calls, at least not yet anyway. I may try Taylors but they were just the distributor and last I spoke to them was at the NRA show in St. Louis. When I brought up Hartford Armory they just walked away.

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I have a pair of EMF Uberti's and while i don't have a problem with light hammer hits I have had the same experience with the screw and my lightened mainsprings but not with the Uberti stock springs.

 

Willy

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The S&W double action has a stirrup connection to the hammer, so the length change from the strain screw won't let it fall off.

 

I cured a few Ubertis that fell off the hammer roller by putting a shim (small piece of drill rod or pin) in the slot under the bottom of the spring to boost it up pushing the top tip further in under the hammer roller, sometimes the slot might be too deep or the spring too short. If you back the screw out too far it changes the curve and can actually make the pull heavier. Turning the screw in too far effectively shortens the spring by over arching it and it pops out from under the roller. If you can't get the pull you want with the strain screw, you will have to work on the spring by narrowing it to lessen the tension.

 

Change the width rather than the thickness for better control of the spring force. Thickness changes a leaf spring strength by the square of the thickness. (half the thickness is the square root less strong) Change of width is one to one. (half the width is half as strong).

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