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Garrison Joe, SASS #60708

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Posts posted by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708

  1. Pressure capability of the .45 caliber Uberti toggle link guns will be at least as high as the SAAMI ammunition standard pressure for .45 Colt, which is 14,000 PSI.   Any factory load that meets SAAMI specifications will be safe.   The major ammo makers produce their standard ammo within the SAAMI limits.    Same story for the revolver you are considering.

     

    I'd suggest a jacketed bullet load for hunting (probably 240 or 250 grain hollow point), and a lead bullet for target use, probably something like 160 grain round nose flat point.  Keep it pleasant to shoot and you will be more likely to practice.

     

    good luck, GJ  

    • Like 2
  2. I've been using Perfect Pattern for cowboy 12 gauge loads, too.

     

    I like a little recoil, so I'm running the STS hull, Winchester or Nobel 209 primer, 14.5 grains Perfect Pattern, CB 0178-12 (gray) wad and 7/8 ounce shot.   Don't feel a need to go lighter, and I get perfect crimps.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

    3 hours ago, Randy Saint Eagle, SASS # 64903 said:

    So far I like it as well as my Clay Dot loads.

     

    Me too.

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  3. And a lot of my needs for replacement springs is satisfied by the coil spring assortments offered by Brownells.   While I'm sure there are a few that I can't find in those collections, I can't remember a coil spring need yet that wasn't met.

     

    Except perhaps pump shotgun magazine tube springs.  Fortunately, a Remington 870 12 gauge spring fits a ton of 12 gauge pumps and semi-autos.

     

    good luck, GJ

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  4. That's a hammer-shrouded Iver Johnson or one of several alias company names that IJ made for (called hammerless, but the hammer is still in the hump above the grip).

     

    If it is in good repair and shoots, it has higher value than if just a paperweight.    The lockwork mechanisms are easily broken and often worn, and being a BP gun, the barrel probably will look like a sewer pipe.

     

    Should have been a few roll stamps along the rib on the barrel.  But those may have been polished away and a re-finish of the gun done many years ago.

     

    Collector's value - zilch.  If it can be turned into a reliable firearm, for shooting BP loads, then it might bring $75 or so.   And that would be to a cowboy shooter wanting a pocket pistol.   General shooter (non-cowboy) value close to zilch.   Probably worth more for parts to repair other IJ revolvers.

     

    It is not advisable to load even very low pressure smokeless loads.  Use BP only.  The frame and locking latch spring VERY easily on these guns, the cylinder walls are thin, and they go down hill fast to being a non-functioning gun from there.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

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  5. Finding the info about crimp starter setting is VERY easy.   Lyman Shotshell loading manual, 5th edition has great instructions.   MEC 9000 loading manual.  If you did not get that with the machine, here you go:

     

    https://www.mecoutdoors.com/owners-manuals-sr

     

    Then go to the manual for your specific machine.

     

    Basically, on a 12 gauge hull, the crimp cone as made by the crimp starter (also called pre-crimper) should have an opening the size of a pencil or a 209 primer "nose" in the petals.  Too little (meaning too large an open hole), and you get crumpled ugly crimps.  Too much (too small an opening), and you get swirls in the crimp.  Or even a fold-up collision of petals in the crimp.  SO easy to set it right.

     

    good luck, GJ

  6. 1 - it's not a problem.  At least, if your marks are similar to those from a picture that was posted by a member with the understanding and time to post a nice photo

     

    2 - you could grind the alignment ridges out with a dremel or use a sharp curved chisel or .... many other ways including a lathe or drill press   BUT, then you might get poor crimp starting, which would make some ugly crimps on your nice STS hulls.

     

    good luck, GJ

  7. Fussy - NO!   Use a simple technique that works.

    After shooting, spray (even pour) some of your water-based cleaner down each barrel and make sure it coats the whole barrel.   Let sit 5-10 minutes while you clean your other BP guns.  Fold up a quarter of a paper towel,dampen it with cleaner, push from breech to muzzle.   Snake skin will come out 100% on the first pass.  And if you use a cleaner with a water soluble soap in it, you leave the barrel protected from most rust, too.   One pass on a couple of barrels - can't get less fussy than that. 

     

    I really like PAM to clean with, equal volumes of hydrogen Peroxide, rubbing Alcohol, and Murphys oil soap.  Mix some up once a month, store in a brown bottle (peroxide bottles are perfect).

     

    Catch your snake skins in a trash can, rather than on ground or a sink.  Spouse will thank you.

     

    ALL BP shot loads ought to be patterned before trusting them on the SASS range.  An old cardboard box at 8 paces will work fine for this.  And you can shoot at least 4 patterns per box if you rotate to a new side.   Lots of powder (like 3 drams) blows central holes in patterns.   I use more shot than powder.  We don't need magnum velocity, just a solid pattern.

     

    good luck, GJ

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  8. 9 hours ago, Reverend P. Babcock Chase said:

    I hope you weren't commenting on my post.

    Nope   :^) , it was in regards to posts where "orientation standards" were broken, and parts renaming from the usual names in double guns was confusing the discussion.

     

    It is very important to understand the implications and side effects of working on the action locking and unlocking mechanisms in shotguns.   Poorly performed home gunsmithing probably runs second to extreme levels of gun wear (either lots of rounds or lots of pressure) in the wearing out/loosening up of shotguns.

     

    good luck, GJ

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  9. Read the good Capt George Baylor's explanation of this (see his recent book), and you will understand. 

     

    Black powder has always been measured by volume, since small weights (used for individual loads in firearms) are difficult to weigh in the field.  So, powder measures (which measure volume) are marked with volume measurement lines that show the volume occupied by the corresponding weight of powder.

     

    So, from this comes the rather awkward term of "weight by volume".   This gives good results for most real black powders, even today.   Since BP is controlled to about 1.76 grams per cubic centimeter, or roughly 27 grains per CC.

     

    The "weight by volume" term really explains what is going on with measuring black powder.   You want to drop into the barrel/chamber the same weight of powder every time, but be able to measure it out quickly in the field.  Thus, the measure carried by BP shooters is marked in grains of weight that the marked volume will drop (approximately).  Those markings are no longer a direct prediction of the weight dropped when the gray powders are measured with them, due to density differences.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
  10. 1 hour ago, Tall John said:

    on the front edge of part 347

     

    Your arrow points to the projection on the REAR of part 347 (the top lock lever)

     

    Discussions of gun work should always use the proper orientation of the firearm and the parts as they are installed in the gun.   "Forward" is towards the muzzle end of the firearm.  "Rearward" is toward the butt stock.   Orientation directions are just as if the firearm is held when firing.

     

    This would eliminate a ton of confusion in this thread.   And calling parts by their proper name helps a lot too.  Don't write about both the locking bolt and the underbarrel locking lugs as "lugs."

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Confused 1
  11. Says more about the machine operator not paying attention to when tooling needs sharpening!  And then too little QA.  All to save costs, I would guess  GJ

    • Like 2
  12. 6 hours ago, Painted Mohawk SASS 77785 said:

    know it did fire the left first as that was the barrel with a screw in modified choke yet when I used it last w'end it was firing the right barrel first with the full choke

    Sounds like there is a "selector" involved with your single-trigger mechanism.  Find and figure out how to control it.

     

    But if you have choke tubes in the gun, it IS in your control - swap the tubes.

  13. Most side by sides with dual triggers have the front trigger fire the right barrel, back trigger fires the left barrel.  Baikal, SKB, Browning, all work that way.  Suppose your Boito does too.

     

    If both barrels are Cylinder (no choke) it makes no difference which one fires first.   And if you are doing a single shell reload instead of 2 at a time, don't do it even for a makeup shot.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 2
  14. I'd do this with a chamber polishing flexi-hone.   Brownells has a "22 magnum" hone that if you wrap some tape around it to limit the travel into the chamber just far enough for .22 LR, would probably take the roughness out.  800 grit.  Get their "flexi-hone" oil, as if you use other oils it can soften the adhesive that holds the  abrasive balls together on the brush.

     

    https://www.brownells.com/tools-cleaning/paint-metal-prep/abrasives-polishing/rifle-polishing-system/

     

    Go slow, follow their instructions, use the special oil.  I've used these on rough .38 special chambers, .45 colt, the mainspring housing bore of 1911 pistols, 12 gauge chambers and forcing cones.  They really polish up a chamber/bore!

     

    Realize that the manufacturer states this is for a .22 magnum chamber.   So, you will want to use it very lightly, and in the fine grit (800) it should not make the .22 LR chambers too sloppy.   No guarantees that it will hold to a perfect .22 LR chamber, though.

     

    An alternative would be to make up a honing tool yourself, perhaps a 0.200" diameter (or 3/16") brass rod that you split with a fine jewelers saw blade enough to hold one wrap of 400 grit sandpaper.   Turn very slow with a drill.  

     

    Another alternative - if you want a strong guarantee - get a finish reamer for .22 LR.   It'll be $200 to buy, so look to (I believe) a company "4D" for a rental reamer.  You may want to be real careful so you do not ding it and incur a regrind/replacement charge.  If you have a local gunsmith who cuts barrels and chambers, you could have him rent one and do the work.   This will cut any part of the chamber clean which was not cut well at factory.  It will not remove "too-deep" gouges

     

    Have you checked with Ruger to see if they will do this work as a warranty job?

     

    good luck, GJ

  15. They may no longer be making the .45 Colt Dual Ring Carbide Sizing die.  Midway for example shows all the individual sizer dies for all the pistol calibers are discontinued.   I'd look on Ebay to see if there are some used dies there.  I see several loading equipment sites that are showing a dual ring sizer in .45 Auto, .44 Special and .40 S&W sets.

     

    Like:

    https://www.precisionreloading.com/cart.php#!q=dual ring

     

    I got mine 5 years ago and have written about it at least 3 times on here.  Perhaps a flood of requests to Redding and they might again make them?

     

    The other way to get a tight neck and a "loose" larger diameter body might be to use two sizer dies.   A carbide sizer to size the top third of the case, and a steel sizer that can be reamed/honed out to set the rest of the body to a larger diameter.  Yes, it would be a pain. 

     

    good luck with a search, GJ

     

     

     

    • Thanks 1
  16. All long range iron sight shooting recommendations I follow call for just enough of a front sight size (width) to let your eyes still pick it up.  A large bead that you are trying to guess exactly where the rounded top ends is also going to block almost half of your view of the target.   That is one reason good long range sights (like the Lyman globe front sight) have a selection of inserts that can be swapped out to match the range you are shooting, including ring sights that leave the exact center of the target visible.  Next most accurate is a fairly narrow post with a sharp-edged top that lets you know exactly where the aiming point on the sight blade is.  Most of my long range military rifle shooting I do is with exactly that - a target post sight, if needed, thinned down to the smallest thickness I can see well.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
  17. I've shot 200 yards with .45 Colt and a 200 grain bullet over a full load of WST.   I could hold on a man silhouette over a bench rest pretty well once open iron sights were set correctly.

     

    Make up the best 100 yard load then work it out to longer range.  It will never be a 30-06 or .338 Lapua.   Don't fall in the trap of putting a huge front BEAD sight on it - you will loose the target at 200 yards.

     

    good luck, GJ

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  18. Get a pair of those used factory springs, then grind a LITTLE metal off the outside of the coils, all along the length of the coil. Thin the coiled wire down, removing no more than 10% of original thickness.  Leave the spring length alone.   Then polish so no grinding marks remain as stress risers (concentration points).   That should reduce the strength of the spring by 25% without causing premature failure.   Seen several gunsmiths use that trick on coil springs, as well as doing it myself.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Thanks 1
  19. A buffer motor, wheels and stainless-steel compatible buffing compound in several grits, down to about 1200 grit.   Be aware of the extra glare/glint you get off the top of the slide and sights - might want to leave that in matte finish.  Brownells carries all that and probably still provides some great instruction sheets.  

     

    A light touch is needed over any lettering and screw/pin holes to avoid washing and wallowing them out    If this is your first attempt at buffing, do something real cheap as your practice piece, then you'll find if you have the steady hands and patience needed to do a nice job.  Otherwise, there's several GUN finishing shops around your location that can do this for probably $200 or so.  But never let a bumper re-chrome shop touch one.

     

    good luck, GJ

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  20. Another thing - what is the expander button diameter below where the expansion bell on the button is (before the taper out to larger diameter) ? 

     

    If you are using a lead bullet of .429" diameter, and you only open the lower part of the neck up to about 0.427 (a diameter common with some .44-40 expander buttons), then you have a lot of neck tension as you seat the bullet, and that may be squishing some of the bands on the bullet upward and out at the case mouth.

     

    good luck, GJ

  21. Those pictures are very similar to when a seating die is turning the crimp into the bullet BEFORE the seater depth has been fully reached.  As in, bullet continues to be shoved in the case AFTER the crimp has come down to bullet diameter.    Thus, the mouth shaves lead from that point on. 

     

    First, you are belling a little too much.   Because there is a gap in picture between the bullet base and, and the brass at the mouth.   You could close that up a hair and eliminate your first reported problem that the case will not by hand enter the seating die fully.

     

    Second, it seems the crimp ring in the die is turning in the mouth BEFORE your bullet has reached desired depth of seating.   Can you back off the body of the die so that NO crimp is applied, seat a bullet to right spot, then back off the STEM and run the BODY of the die of the die down to make the crimp you want, then run the STEM back down to touch the nose of bullet with that cartridge in the die, so you get the seating stem real close to the proper seating depth again.

     

    Are you SURE you don't have a bunch of dried lube stuck in the die below the original crimp ring?   Cleaned the die body with solvent and a brush yet? 

     

    This is a combined seat/crimp die, right?   Difficulties like this is why loading .44-40 is normally done with a seater die, then a crimp die.

     

    good luck, GJ

  22. 1 hour ago, Savvy Jack said:

    I used the Lyman "M" die to prevent shaving and seating issues common to the 44-40.

     

    The M die is always a great way to handle cast bullet belling problems, because it is very adjustable and it gets the main part of the neck internal diameter sized right for a cast bullet.  Use one in all my 6.5mm, .30 cal,  8mm and .45 cal rifle cast bullet loading.

     

    But I get good results with an RCBS .429" expander button in RCBS die set that I run in a turret press.  No Dillon hi-speed loading with .44-40 - just NOT worth all the case damage from bulges.

     

    good luck, GJ

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