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Subdeacon Joe

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Posts posted by Subdeacon Joe

  1. Joe. I really appreciate your intelligence. Please explain to this ditsy blond how 253 = England, 269 = expects etc. I have figured out duty but the rest is beyond me.

     

    Thank you for all your great posts.

    Alas, it is not given to mere landsmen to know the arcana of naval signal flags, alas.

     

    That's because it all came from the Signal Book

     

     

     

     

    ENGLAND EXPECTS

     

    icon35.gif

     

    NELSON'S TRAFALGAR SIGNALS • 21 October 1805

    Notes

     

    The signaling system in use by the Royal Navy at the time of the Battle of Trafalgar had been introduced in 1799 by Admiral Lord Howe and was further developed by Captain Sir Home Popham. Howe's original system was based on a set of flags numbered 0 to 9 that when hoisted in various combinations could transmit words, numbers, or messages listed in the Signal Book. Each letter of the alphabet was allotted a number, enabling words to be spelled out, The numeral flags could also be used to send numbers as such. But most signals were two-or three-flag combinations which referenced messages in the Signal Book, e.g. to discontinue the engagement, to pursue the enemy, to anchor, etc. The Signal Book was so arranged that the sender and receiver could quickly compose and interpret flag hoists.

    Howe's system was impractical for sending long messages due to the large number of flags required to spell out individual words. In 1800, therefore, Captain Popham developed a "vocabulary" system by which three- or four-flag hoists referenced words or phrases in the Signal Book. This was the system in use at the time of Trafalgar and Nelson's famous signal is a fine example of how it worked. This type of hoist was preceded by the so-called telegraph flag, indicating that a vocabulary message was to be sent. The signal was terminated by a finishing flag, functioning like the period at the end of a sentence. Receiving ships acknowledged the signal by hoisting the Affirmative flag, indicating that it had been seen and understood. If the signal was seen but not understood, receiving ships hoisted the Affirmative flag over numeral flag no. 8. For repeated numbers a substitute flag was provided. In Nelson's signal this flag, yellow with black stripes along the top and bottom, was employed in the hoist for the word do (No. 221), substituting for a second no. 2 flag.

    The second signal that Nelson ordered to be hoisted was No. 16 in the Signal Book: "Engage the enemy more closely." This remained aloft until it was shot away in the heat of battle.

     

     

    victory.jpg

     

    "England expects that every man will do his duty": HMS Victory on 21 October 1905, the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar, with Nelson's famous signal to his fleet hoisted. Also visible are the Union Jack at the bow, the White Ensign at the stern and the rank flag of a full admiral, the Cross of St. George, at the main.

  2. https://www.defense.gov/News/Article/Article/1055908/defense-secretary-issues-message-to-nations-sentinels-and-guardians

     

    It’s good to be back and I’m grateful to serve alongside you as Secretary of Defense.

    Together with the Intelligence Community we are the sentinels and guardians of our nation. We need only look to you, the uniformed and civilian members of the Department and your families, to see the fundamental unity of our country. You represent an America committed to the common good; an America that is never complacent about defending its freedoms; and an America that remains a steady beacon of hope for all mankind.

    Every action we take will be designed to ensure our military is ready to fight today and in the future. Recognizing that no nation is secure without friends, we will work with the State Department to strengthen our alliances. Further, we are devoted to gaining full value from every taxpayer dollar spent on defense, thereby earning the trust of Congress and the American people.

    I am confident you will do your part. I pledge to you I’ll do my best as your Secretary.

    MATTIS SENDS


    Seems almost to be channeling Adm. Nelson

     

    1280px-England_Expects_Signal.svg.png

     

  3. "A private letter to James Robertson from James Madison, written April 20, 1831, in which Madison suggests how to interpret the United States Constitution with regards to the admission of new states and the "general welfare" clause.

    Montpellier, April 20, 1831.
    Dear Sir,—Your letter of the 3d instant, post-marked the 5th, was not received till the day before yesterday, the 18th. I know not that I can say anything on the constitutional points stated, which has not been substantially said in publications into which I have been heretofore led. In general, I adhere to the remark, that the proper way to understand our novel and complex system of government is to avoid, as much as may be, the use of technical terms and phrases appropriate to other forms, and to examine the process of its formation, the peculiarity of its structure, and the limitation and distribution of its powers. Much of the constitutional controversy which has prevailed has turned, as often happens, on the different ideas attached to the language employed, and would have been obviated by previous definitions of its terms. That the people of the United States formed the Constitution, will be denied or affirmed according to the sense in which the expression is understood. The main question is, whether they have not given to the charter a sanction in a capacity and a mode that shuts the door against all such disuniting and nullifying doctrines as those lately advanced.
    If the authority to admit new States be sufficiently conveyed by the text of the Constitution, there would seem to be not more difficulty in the principle of the case than in that of naturalizing an alien, at least where the territory of the admitted State made a part of the original domain. In the case of an acquired territory, with its inhabitants, as in that of Louisiana, the questions belonging to it are questions of construction, turning on the constitutional authority to acquire, and to admit when acquired. You are no doubt aware that such questions were actually raised on that occasion.
    With respect to the words "general welfare," I have always regarded them as qualified by the detail of powers connected with them. To take them in a literal and unlimited sense would be a metamorphosis of the Constitution into a character which there is a host of proofs was not contemplated by its creators. If the words obtained so readily a place in the "Articles of Confederation," and received so little notice in their admission into the present Constitution, and retained for so long a time a silent place in both, the fairest explanation is, that the words, in the alternative of meaning nothing or meaning everything, had the former meaning taken for granted.
    I have availed myself, sir, of your permission to give a brief answer to your letter, and the rather as the interval between its receipt and your intended departure for the West did not well admit of a long one. Nor, indeed, with more time, could I have added much to it that would not have been superfluous to you, as well as inconvenient at the octogenary age of which I am reminded whenever I take up my pen on such subjects.
    With friendly salutations,"
  4. https://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=4613

     

     

     

    TITLE: "World War II: 365 Days"


    SPEAKER: Various
    EVENT DATE: 2009/05/27
    RUNNING TIME: 59 minutes
    TRANSCRIPT: View Transcript (link will open in a new window)

    DESCRIPTION:

    Described in a recent review as "one of the best single-volume histories of the war yet published," "World War II: 365 Days" is a unique compilation of riveting text and more than 600 color and black-and-white images (many of them rarely seen) from the Library of Congress's collections. The speakers discuss their work on the book.

    Related Webcasts

    SERIES: Books & Beyond

    Related Library Resources

     

  5. When you fire that cannon, how heavy does the anchor holding the punt in place have to be? Or do you spend 3 hrs rowing back to where the dead ducks are?

     

     

    If you were to anchor the punt you would likely tear it apart from the recoil. Like with all muzzle loading artillery, you needed free recoil. I haven't read any accounts of how far the punts moved, but it likely wasn't all that farm that square stern and the oars in the water would slow it down considerably.

  6. Interesting article, Joe. Thanks.

    I had forgotten about how they aimed these guns. I also scrolled down far enough to read some of the comments. There's a guy named Roger that could use a good kick in the backside...but then his brain would probably dislodge and fall out.

     

    Why do I bother looking at the comments...stupid people irk me...

     

     

    Because they can also be hilarious.

  7. http://www.desertusa.com/desert-people/john-slaughter-lawman.html

     

    slaughter7.jpg

     

     

    Judge Clayton Baird, who rode with Slaughter, said, "Unlike squalid old badge wearers such as John Selman and Wild Bill Hickok, John Slaughter was basically a very reserved sort of man. Nobody who wished to keep on calling terms with him overstepped that boundary I always felt between ordinary casual friendliness and egregious overfamiliarity.

    "Years before, I would learn, a breezy stranger, trading on his Southern accent, had twice dared address him as ‘Tex.’ The second time was the last time. Slaughter had turned, stared the fellow out of countenance through piercing black eyes and said, ‘My name is Slaughter, sir. If you ever have reason to greet me, I would advise you to remember the name is Slaughter.’"

     

  8. “Destroyer Escort That Fought Like a Battleship”

     

     

    It was the early morning of 25th of October, and the red sun reflected its image on the ocean’s surface. All of a sudden, there were ships behind the sun’s reflection — a 23-vessel-strong task force under the command of Vice Admiral Takeo Kurita — appeared out of nowhere on the horizon and opened fire. Taken by surprise and extremely overpowered, USS Samuel B. Roberts was indeed in a tight spot.

    Nevertheless, it decided to charge the Japanese ships without question. The CO, Lieutenant Commander Robert W. Copeland announced to his men:

    “We’re making a torpedo run. The outcome is doubtful, but we will do our duty.”

     

     

  9. SCOTUS said the entire Bill of Rights is not negotiable:

     

    "The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw certain subjects from the vicissitudes of political controversy, to place them beyond the reach of majorities and officials and to establish them as legal principles to be applied by the courts. One's right to life, liberty, and property, to free speech, a free press, freedom of worship and assembly, and other fundamental rights may not be submitted to vote; they depend on the outcome of no elections."

    : Robert H. Jackson, US Supreme Court Justice West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, 319 U.S. 624 (1943)

  10. OH!
    Piana Paxon
    Marion Zimmer Bradly
    her Daughter, Moira Greyland (fair hand with an epee)

    Poul Anderson

    George Lucas (tried to keep him out of an authors/directors/big wigs party at a sifi convention because he didn't have the proper badge. He took it in good humor that I didn't recognize him. We discussed it a bit, finally I said, OK, judging from you obviously expensive leather jacket with the Lucasfilms logo embroidered on it, you must be a "somebody" go on in."

  11. http://abc7.com/news/george-hw-bush-moved-to-icu-barbara-bush-also-hospitalized/1708018/

     

     

     

    Updated 7 mins ago
    HOUSTON --
    Former President George H.W. Bush was admitted to an intensive care unit on Wednesday, and his wife, Barbara, was hospitalized as a precaution, according to his spokesman.

    The former president was admitted to the ICU at Houston Methodist Hospital to "address an acute respiratory problem stemming from pneumonia," family spokesman Jim McGrath said in a statement.

    McGrath said the former first lady was hospitalized as a precaution after experiencing fatigue and coughing.

    "Doctors performed a procedure to protect and clear his airway that required sedation. President Bush is stable and resting comfortable in the ICU, where he will remain for observation," McGrath said in the statement.

    The 41st president was admitted to the hospital on Saturday for shortness of breath, McGrath said in an email to The Associated Press earlier Wednesday.

    McGrath said the 92-year-old was responding well to treatments.

     

    Updated 7 mins ago
    HOUSTON --
    Former President George H.W. Bush was admitted to an intensive care unit on Wednesday, and his wife, Barbara, was hospitalized as a precaution, according to his spokesman.

    The former president was admitted to the ICU at Houston Methodist Hospital to "address an acute respiratory problem stemming from pneumonia," family spokesman Jim McGrath said in a statement.

    McGrath said the former first lady was hospitalized as a precaution after experiencing fatigue and coughing.

    "Doctors performed a procedure to protect and clear his airway that required sedation. President Bush is stable and resting comfortable in the ICU, where he will remain for observation," McGrath said in the statement.

    The 41st president was admitted to the hospital on Saturday for shortness of breath, McGrath said in an email to The Associated Press earlier Wednesday.

    McGrath said the 92-year-old was responding well to treatments.
  12. Some of the best craftsmen in the country. Know of several houses with basement walls that were shifting / collapsing that they expertly repaired.

     

     

    After Hurricane Katrina many Amish and Mennonites spent years helping to rebuild, donating their labor.

  13. Robin Williams at the Black Point Ren Faire.

     

    Rod Serling, Tenzig Norgay, Richard Leaky, Thor Heyerdahl - all as guest lecturers in a series by Palomar and Mira Costa junior colleges in the '60s and '70s.

     

    Alexi II, Patriarch of Moscow and All Rus - at Ft, Ross, CA. Well...got his blessing along with a piece of cake. A week later we saw him on TV trying to negotiate a peace between the factions as the Soviet Union fell apart.

  14. http://www.kcra.com/article/how-the-amish-build-a-buggy/8592222

     

     

    "Back in the '60s, a local Amish man started going through junkyards and getting the old seven-inch VW brakes," our builder says, "salvaging them, repairing them, and cleaning them up, and retrofitting them to buggies. After a while he started getting good castings made. Now all the buggy brakes are manufactured by buggy shops."

    Builders cast the drums in steel and the backer plates and shoes in aluminum-tin alloy. "We'll buy the castings, and we'll machine, we'll drill the holes, we'll process them, and install the components," he says. "We actually bond our own shoes. We buy brake lining from a brake company in Ohio."

    The few disc brakes used on buggies are off-the-shelf parts bought from outside Amish communities and usually were manufactured for dune buggies. For both drums and discs, the brake master cylinder, which moves the hydraulic fluid that actuates the brakes, is mounted underneath the body near an Amish-made pedal assembly whose foot pedal pokes up through the floor into the interior. The master cylinders are made of anodized aluminum at an Amish shop, also in Ohio.

     

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