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Hikes Point Hank

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About Hikes Point Hank

  • Birthday 12/15/1961

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  • SASS #
    93071
  • SASS Affiliated Club
    Im Nationwide

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  • Website URL
    http://johnnichols1@gmail.com

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    Male
  • Location
    Clay, Alabama
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    Anything interesting
  1. Vinegar is great for stripping the bluing from your guns also. Watch out.
  2. No surprise that vibration kills the bearings after a while. The rotarys with stainless pins are hard to beat for longevity as the bearings just rotate instead of being pounded by an out of balance situation to cause vibration. Especially when loaded heavily.
  3. Good man this one. We're all prayin and pullin for you brother
  4. From the article Blue Wolf is referring to: There appears to be some confusion as to if and when it is appropriate to turn steel targets over, in an attempt to get additional life out of them. It is our intent to clear that issue up, and share some general information with those tasked with range equipment maintenance. To apply some context, years ago the steel being used for targets was primarily T1, manufactured by U.S. Steel. It had a Brinell hardness rating of about 235. When it was shot a lot, it would become concaved (i.e. dented in), in the impact area. The steel we use at MGM Targets today has a Brinell rating of 500 and does not become concave when shot. 500 Brinell steel is much harder and consequently, the result of bullet impacts is dramatically different. Envision a penny on an anvil being struck repeatedly with a hammer. It gets much thinner, and at the same time, larger in diameter. Exactly the same thing is happening to the face of our pistol targets as we pound them with bullets. The hardness of the current steel allows only the front of the target to be peened, (enlarged). Therefore, if the near side of the target is growing (from the constant hammering) but the back side does not grow, the only thing that can happen is for the target to bow. It will often become CONVEXED, and bow toward the shooter - Yes, exactly opposite of what T-1 targets do.
  5. According to the home page for Arntzen Targets Soft steel will bow away (concave) Hard steel will bow towards the shooter (convex) Don't most clubs use hard steel these days?
  6. I think you mean Arntzen, Stud. Just rotating them ain't gonna get it. Ya gotta know how to rotate em (and why helps). Kinda like doin an alignment on a front end of a vehicle... If it needs it by all means do it. If the tires are wearing fine then why bother. The person doing the alignment might throw off a good thing...I used to do alignments, ya gotta trust me on this one. So a target is bowing after a few months of monthly matches and lots of impacts...Well, which way is it bowing and why? If it's not bowing should you rotate it just because? If it ain't broke...well, just sayin. Arntzen has a brief explanation on their home page but I'm having difficulties finding other possibly more detailed info. Let's give this one time to steep a little. I think you just might be surprised how this actually works. And I hope it helps some clubs out money wise cause that steel ain't cheap.
  7. I've found it a little difficult to find information on when to turn, rotate, reverse or flip steel targets on the internet. I also want to let more shooters know how to tell when their targets need to be reversed. Might save a little aggravation and money as well. Its not as "obvious" as one might think. Can somebody help me find a reputable article?
  8. Pictures worth a thousand words. Sure would save a lot of talkin.
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