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Tex Jones, SASS 2263

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Posts posted by Tex Jones, SASS 2263

  1. Edited from Fox News:

     

    Champion of justice "The Lone Ranger" and trusty steed Silver rode across the Wild West and into American lore for the first time on this day in history, Jan. 30, 1933.

    Lone Ranger was soon joined by Native American sidekick Tonto to become the original crime-fighting dynamic duo of multimedia fame.

    The program debuted on WXYZ in Detroit — the first of more than 3,000 radio episodes over the next two decades.

     

     

    "'The Lone Ranger' was an instant success, and the character became known for his black domino mask, code of honor, signature silver bullets, and horse Silver," the Smithsonian Institution notes. 

    "According to his moral code, the Lone Ranger attempts to avoid violence, shooting only to disarm, not kill, and using silver bullets as a reminder of the value of human life."

    The Lone Ranger rides again and again — as generations of Americans recognize the familiar theme and hearty "Hi-yo, Silver!" of the famous masked man. Over the years, some 18 actors portrayed the larger-than-life hero on radio and TV.

    The Lone Ranger rides again and again — as generations of Americans recognize the familiar theme and hearty "Hi-yo, Silver!" of the famous masked man. Over the years, some 18 actors portrayed the larger-than-life hero on radio and TV. (Getty Images)

    The radio show soon found a nationwide audience of millions of listeners. Meant for children, it enjoyed equal appeal among adults.

    "During the next 80 years, ‘The Lone Ranger’ would appear in comic strips, television shows and movies, not to mention a vast array of merchandise including action figures, costumes, books and toy guns," writes Indian Country Times, a news site of indigenous American culture. 

    "He's a vigilante lawman … a hero made for radio audiences of the Great Depression." — NPR

    "The show also helped define the TV Western, inspiring dozens of other titles."

    "The Lone Ranger" made its television debut in 1949 and was an early TV-era hit for ABC before ending in 1957. Other TV adaptations followed.

     

    Lone Ranger and Tonto spawned several series of novels, the first in 1935, and appeared in comic book form for the first time in 1939. 

    Arnie Hammer starred as Lone Ranger and Johnny Depp played Tonto in the latest of several Hollywood versions of the duo's adventures in 2013. 

    "The Lone Ranger Rides Again," lobby card, from left: Robert Livingston, Chief Thundercloud in "Chapter 1: The Lone Ranger Returns," 1939. 

    "The Lone Ranger Rides Again," lobby card, from left: Robert Livingston, Chief Thundercloud in "Chapter 1: The Lone Ranger Returns," 1939.  (LMPC via Getty Images)

    Numerous voice and screen actors played the roles over the years. 

    Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels are most closely associated with Lone Ranger and Tonto for their years of playing the characters on television.

    A dramatic back story brought together the masked lawman and his Comanche friend. 

    "It's obvious to the child listener that great men have no racial or religious prejudice." — Fran Striker Jr.

    Lone Ranger was one of six Texas Rangers ambushed and gunned down by outlaws.

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    "After the shooting was over, an Indian man happened upon the scene of the ambush. The ranger, who was wounded but still clinging to life, had saved that Indian from outlaw raiders a few years earlier, when the two were just boys," writes NPR in a history of the landmark program. 

     

    "The Indian recognized his boyhood companion, carried him to a nearby cave and nursed him back to health. Four days later, the surviving Ranger came to. And he asked his savior what had happened to his comrades. The Indian showed him the graves of the other five Rangers … ‘You only Ranger left … You Lone Ranger.’"

    Armie Hammer, Gore Verbinski and Johnny Depp attend the U.K. premiere of "The Lone Ranger" at Odeon Leicester Square on July 21, 2013, in London.  

    Armie Hammer, Gore Verbinski and Johnny Depp attend the U.K. premiere of "The Lone Ranger" at Odeon Leicester Square on July 21, 2013, in London.   (Karwai Tang/WireImage)

    The experience steeled their friendship and commitment to fight crime and proved foundational to the program's appeal. Lone Ranger wore a mask to help fool arch-enemy Butch Cavendish into believing he was killed in the ambush. 

    The Lone Ranger was created for radio by George W. Trendle and Fran Striker.

    Trendle owned WXYZ and produced the show. Striker created the characters and wrote the script. 

    They devised the ambush origin story after 10 episodes of the series, when the masked ranger riding alone needed a sidekick to add dialogue to the show 

     

     

    The main characters presented racial unity in action rather than words — or without the social media grandstanding that prizes preaching over practice that's so common today. 

    "If the Lone Ranger accepts the Indian as his closest companion, it's obvious to the child listener that great men have no racial or religious prejudice," the creator's son, Fran Striker Jr., told NPR.

    "The Lone Ranger," among other influences, gifted the nation with several additions to American English.

    Clayton Moore (1914-1999), U.S. actor, in costume as he sits on his horse, Silver, which rears up in a publicity still issued for the television series, "The Lone Ranger," circa 1950. The series starred Moore as Lone Ranger.

    Clayton Moore (1914-1999), U.S. actor, in costume as he sits on his horse, Silver, which rears up in a publicity still issued for the television series, "The Lone Ranger," circa 1950. The series starred Moore as Lone Ranger. (Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

    "Kemosabe," Tonto's affectionate word for Lone Ranger, is a colloquial phrase for "friend." 

    The word originated in the Ojibwe language.

    Lone Ranger's yelp of "Hi-yo, Silver!" — heard in each episode — might be uttered before any jaunty, fearless charge into action. 

    The term "lone ranger" itself is a common American idiom for anyone pursuing something alone. 

    "I believe in my Creator, my country, my fellow man." — Lone Ranger creed

    "The Lone Ranger" also helped popularize for generations of Americans "The William Tell Overture," used as its theme song

    The program's creators spun off another masked hero, The Green Hornet, who likewise became a superhero of radio, TV, comic books and film. 

    "The Lone Ranger" (1949-57), the adventures of masked hero, The Lone Ranger (Clayton Moore) and his Native American partner, Tonto (Jay Silverheels).

    "The Lone Ranger" (1949-57), the adventures of masked hero, The Lone Ranger (Clayton Moore) and his Native American partner, Tonto (Jay Silverheels). (ABC Photo Archives/Disney General Entertainment Content via Getty Images)

    They gave the vigilante lawman a moral code, commonly known as the Lone Ranger creed, meant to exemplify for troubled Great Depression-era listeners faith in foundational American values. 

     

    "I believe," Striker wrote on behalf of Lone Ranger, "that to have a friend, a man must be one; that all men are created equal and that everyone has within himself the power to make this a better world; that this government 'of the people, by the people and for the people' shall live always."

     

    Lone Ranger's creed of 10 values ends with "I believe in my Creator, my country, my fellow man".

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    • Thanks 2
  2. I have a couple of empty 9 oz cans that went for $20.38 in June 2020 and $24.69 in April 2021.  Based on those prices you're way ahead.  Equivalent price (based on 9, 9 ounce cans) is $16.11.  That's a score.

  3. 5 minutes ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

    When I was a Federal employee, I had to pass an annual test on handling classified documents.

     

     I must have been the only one.

    Who took it or passed it?  :D  We never had a test, just locked the drawers at the end of the day. 

  4. Nice purchase.  A LGS up here had one in stock for over a year.  Also had a Winchester '92 in 44 Mag as well.  I haven't been in the shop for over a month so I don't know if they're still there.

  5. Same here.  How many pills are being hawked for all the ailments/conditions that exist?  I watch a couple of shows on network TV, but tape them so I can fast forward through the commercials.  The national news is a joke.  If it's not how many millions are at risk due to an upcoming snow event it's  how many million are getting rained on/flooded. 

  6. I have been watching the shows for a while now and I noticed a couple of things:

     

    The half hour shows were better than the hour long ones later in the run.

    Matt sure put a lot of folks in Boot Hill.

    Kitty was a beauty. 

    Why didn't Chester carry a gun, except for a few occasions? 

    • Haha 1
  7. 1 hour ago, Garrison Joe, SASS #60708 said:

    Some quick measurements done carefully, but only with an good dial caliper (not a depth mike, which I don't have).

    Five cases, very lightly cleaned pockets, average depth:

     

    Starline unfired, from about 2008             0.124"

    Starline fired with BP loads 2006?            0.123"

    Winchester fired with BP loads                 0.120"

      (some fairly old - maybe back to 1995) 

     

    Those all seem to be made to PISTOL depth (0.117 to 0.123", per SAAMI)

    Rather than made to RIFLE depth (SAAMI spec,  0.125 to 0.132")

     

    Anybody compare to these?  Especially new made Starline?

     

    good luck, GJ

    Just checked 10 new Starline 44-40 cases.  Miked out (dial caliper) to .120", almost exactly.

  8. DA in Santa Fe indicated today that Alec Baldwin and Hanna Gutierrez Reed will be charged with involuntary manslaughter.  The assistant director, David Halls has agreed to plead guilty to negligent use of a deadly weapon.

    • Thanks 2
  9. I had the pleasant surprise to be on the same flight with her once, over 20+ years ago.  All by herself and very quiet.  I didn't have the courage to say hello, even though she was directly across from me in the cabin.  RIP, Gina.

    • Like 1
  10. Interesting problem.  The charge weight appears to be too light, according to Hodgdon's web site when using Winchester primers.  That may be the variable.  I would try loading to, at least, the minimum, which is 5 grains of 700X and see the results.  Also, if you're shooting in cold weather, that may have an effect on velocity.

     

    I had a problem with high primers in one pistol last year when using my regular loads. It turned out the firing pin bushing had cme loose and the spent primer ended up locking up the pistol.  That was relatively easy to solve with the help of Cholla, who diagnosed the problem.

     

  11. 14 hours ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

    This....

    1665555562_BigLoop92.thumb.JPG.cb9b27937eab55de0d691e8db9f240c8.JPG

     

    ...is a real Winchester and has a 17.5" barrel.   When I bought it, I spun it.   I "impressed" myself, so I spun it again.   Front sight caught my shirt ripped it open, and left a scratch across my chest.  (No scar)   I've never tried to spin it again!

    That's because you don't have long arms like Chuck Connors.  I don't recall exactly, but there was a "stop" attached or machined into his rifles that prevented the cartridge from falling out when the rifle was spin cocked.  John Wayne could spin cock his '92, but in later years the barrel was shortened.

  12. There was one battery open at Ft. Hancock (Sandy Hook, NJ ) years ago, but as the concrete began to crumble it was, and remains, closed to the public.  There are also a number of pillboxes in the area, also either closed or flooded.  About 20 years ago, some ordinance was discovered, which dated from, most likely, the First World War, but could have been from the Civil War.  The beach was closed off and the ordinance was exploded.  Lots of black smoke. 

     

    The Nike missile batteries are gone, but one reproduction with its control vehicle is on display.  Also, there is a memorial stone from the American revolution, which commemorates the loss of British troops.  Lots of history in and around NY harbor.

  13. 5 minutes ago, Wyatt Earp SASS#1628L said:

    The company has been in business since 1931, so I don't understand your comment about history.  Am I missing something?

    During WW II the "French State" known a Vichy France, which included the portion occupied by the Germans, collaborated with the Nazis.  The Free French government in exile was led by Charles DeGaulle.  The "French State" was headquartered in the town of Vichy, in the "unoccupied" zone of France.

    • Like 2
  14. 21 minutes ago, Larsen E. Pettifogger, SASS #32933 said:

    I just got off the phone with Clint.  He said the gun in question was a Mattel Shootin' Shell and that all the Greenie Stick-Um caps were stored before the shoot.  Ruta was wearing a Vibranium skull cap and Alex Baldwin was only two years old so they all felt pretty safe.

    BTW, it's not completely clear, but the revolver looks to be a Great Western, or a Mattel copy.  :)

     

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