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Garrison Joe, SASS #60708

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Posts posted by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708

  1. I have only 4 stations on a Dillon 550, and I HIGHLY value a powder cop/lock out die after the bell and charge station.  That leaves me only one station.  So, on cast bullet .45 auto, .45 Colt and Cowboy .45 spl, I use the combined seat/crimp die.   If I were making Olympic match quality ammo, I'd use separate seat and crimp dies.   Only on .44-40 do I use a separate seat and crimp dies because of the tricky thin neck of a .44-40 case (so easy to bulge a neck and then have failures to chamber).

     

    good luck, GJ

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  2. If you have used that seater die before, and now you can't use it, something has happened to it.   Rust?  Hardened bullet lube in the die?  Got a bore scope you could run into the die for a good visual check?  Perhaps the neck of a case broke off and is stuck in the seating die, from the last time you loaded on it. 

     

    What did Dillon tell you the "proper" amount of belling of the case should be?  Just enough increased diameter that the base of the bullet will enter the case when seated by hand, but won't slide freely into the case neck? Or some other sort of "nonsense"?

     

    Did you stick a .44 spl seater die in that loader instead of a .44 WCF?  :lol:

     

    OK, here's my usual suspect - you need to get a set of Redding dies including the Redding Profile Crimp Die.  That ALWAYS solves a .44-40 loading problem    :lol::lol:  

     

    good luck, GJ   

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  3. So many better (cheaper, available) alternatives....   But if you HAVE to have it (rather than just want it), make the rounds at all the on-line powder vendors once a week and then be willing to pay the hazmat duty.  GJ

    • Haha 1
  4. Most likely the ad copy was lifted from something like an 870 clone (dual action bars and 4 mag capacity) to make the copy for this gun.   Trust almost nothing in ad copy on the Guns.com web site, this says to me.  They have no one checking the ad copy before it gets sent to the web site.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

     

     

     

  5. Guns.com shows a gun they labeled as a 97 Hawk. 

    https://www.guns.com/firearms/shotguns/pump-action/iac-hawk-97-12-ga-pump-action-4-1-rounds-20-7.3-new?p=20384

     

    But I doubt some of the accuracy of the ad copy included on the page, saying that the magazine only holds 4 rounds!

     

    It does indeed look like other IAC 97s as far as the low resolution photo can make it appear.  It is labeled as a "new" model, but I doubt that too.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

  6. 10 minutes ago, Randy Saint Eagle, SASS # 64903 said:

    It looks like he initially pulled 3 as he goes back to his belt after the 3rd shot although he didn’t need another round.

     

    He used 5 rounds on the four shotgun targets on this stage at the match.  Yeah, he pulled 4 when he started with shotgun, IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY (I had the pleasure to be on his posse, standing next to a family member who was shooting the video).  The last 2 shots (not on video) went onto the knockdown targets, meaning he pulled one more from belt at the end.

     

    I'd comment on the scoring discussion, but seems many of you folks would not like it.

     

    good luck, GJ 

  7. 4.2 grains BE with 160 to 180 grain bullets is fine.  I use a 175 grain TC conventional lube myself - cheap and easy to make. 

    I didn't like 4.0 grains TG - had to get to about 4.5 grains to suit me for consistent performance and cleaner cases.

     

    GJ

    • Thanks 1
  8. I'm shooting BullsEye right now, have shot WST, Clays, ClayDot, RedDot and TiteGroup.   All work fine.  It's just a gallery load, and not even an accuracy target load.  Most anything works.  GJ

    • Like 1
  9. Started reloading when I was in high school.  Dad brought a Lee Loader home, handed it to me with a can of powder and couple boxes of primers, and said - "Load these empty .222 Remington cases".

     

    So, I read the flyer, literally knocked together the first 20 rounds.  They all fired, and were about as accurate as factory ammo.  He didn't buy another factory box for shooting varmints as long as I was still at home.

     

    More than 20 rounds a month, though, not worth the time it takes!

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 2
  10. Yeah, and no, highly likely TiteGroup in a 17 bushing will drop a heavier weight than the highest of the range that the requester asked for.  The range I quoted covered what I thought was 1 bushing (more or less) above and below what the desired weight range was.

     

    Oh, OK, I found the web site for Shooters World and see their "test data" that shows they say a MEC #21 bushing throws 17.3 grains of Clean Shot.   As explained before, that is generally not a highly accurate number, since they don't say what type of loader they used.  But, let's assume it is in the ballpark. 

     

    A MEC # 21 bushing would drop WAY more weight of TiteGroup powder weight than it does CleanShot - perhaps about 20 grains.  Per the latest MEC bushing chart from Hodgdon.  So, not all that similar in density of the two powders.  Thus any bushing should throw about 15% heavier charges of TiteGroup than it drops CleanShot.   IF one wants to stick their neck out when comparing apples and oranges.

     

    If you want to see that Hodgdon chart, look here:

    https://hodgdonpowderco.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/09/mec.pdf

     

    But usually the biggest error in trying to pin down a specific bushing number I covered earlier.  Drop weight for a powder from a bushing DEPENDS quite a bit on the machine, the operator's cadence, the powder lot number, and some other things.  So, a scale weight is the only way to get a good load put together.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
  11. No problem with the cut off .45 Colt cases in my C45S handloads.   I trim almost all brands of .45 Colt and none have bulged the case enough when seating a 175 grain, and even a 200 grain slug to ever drag when loading into any Ruger single action I have tried.   I think this may be a theoretical problem, but with the large diameter chambers that most manufacturers put into their .45 Colt pistols, this is not a practical problem.   I get much better case life using my cut down assorted mfgr. cases than I do using Starline Cowboy 45 Special cases, too.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 3
  12. Quote

    Look up the MEC powder bushing chart

     

    As was recommended to you, you can START with this.  Google "MEC bushing chart" and you will find several.   None will be precisely accurate for you.  This is one of the things in reloading that you need to learn how to do, as you will probably do it often.

     

    You did not tell us what loader you are using, which makes a big difference.  Progressive loaders that run several hulls at a time on a rotating shell plate will throw lighter weights than that SAME bushing installed in a single-stage press like the MEC 600 Jr MK V, because a single-stage press makes about 5 strokes of the handle between the time you drop each powder charge, packing the granules of powder into the bushing.

     

    I have completely sworn off telling folks (especially folks just starting to load shotshells) bushing numbers because the RIGHT number depends on way too many variables. 

     

    If you get used to throwing around bushing numbers when talking about loads, you do your own reputation and the safety of others a disservice. IMHO.  From loading shotshells for 50+ years.

     

    My serious recommendation to you is: buy bushings in the range of 12 to 17, skipping the half intervals (the As).  That bunch will have the right one, most likely, and your scale will tell you which one.    Your next powder weight or powder type will require a different bushing, 9 times out of 10.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 2
  13. 8 hours ago, Mr Malco said:

    does anyone know what Mec bushing will give you 13 or 14gr of Tightgroup  TiteGroup

    It varies by the type of loader and your operational technique.  

     

    YOU MUST HAVE A POWDER SCALE.   You CANNOT TRUST any of the powder bushing charts to match what your bushing will really throw.  AND, powders vary from lot to lot - density is the common difference that you will find as you open up new bottles.  So, the only way to be sure you are dropping the weights you need is to test weigh several drops DONE with the loader actually operating as you would when loading. 

     

    A good low end powder scale is the Frankford Arsenal (only about $30) and it is VERY necessary to good, safe reloading results.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
  14. 11 hours ago, Smokin Gator SASS #29736 said:

    You would think they'd have to do one or the other if it was actually an issue. Or if it was they wouldn't offer 45acp at all.

    Not all pistols being made back in the 1920s and 30s were designed properly to handle common commercial ammo without suffering excessive wear,stretching and even blowing cylinders.  (Like Iver Johnson, and many others.)  One of the reasons a Federal Court pretty well cornered and "persuaded" the firearms industry to put together their own standards organization (what we know as SAAMI) back in 1926.  It was do that, or the Court was going to request Congress to set up a Federal organization to enforce firearms and ammo standards.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 1
  15. Many of the reputable vendors now have at least some powders on hand.  Having powder in stock is not a crime and not a sign they are a scammer, on it's own. 

     

    Do not use any vendor that requires a "no-refund/no-recourse" payment method (Zelle, PP F&F, etc), nor cyber coin (unless you are a true expert with it),  nor gift or pre-paid payment cards.  If you ask here, we're glad to help you vet the company.

     

    "If it sounds too good to be true, it's a miss."

     

    good luck, GJ

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  16. So, how would the OP go about recreating what you used to do 30-50 years ago (i.e, buying Javelina lube)?

    I have no recollection of using a smokeless lube successfully with real BP back in the 1970s when I started with muzzleloading.  Mostly I tried NRA 50-50, Lyman Orange Magic, a couple of others before discarding smokeless lube for crisco and beeswax.  

     

    good luck, GJ

  17. 12 hours ago, Smokin Gator SASS #29736 said:

    Didn't Colt chamber some SAA in 45acp?

    Not that I ever heard.

     

    I do have a Ruger Blackhawk with dual factory cylinders (.45 Colt and .45 Auto).  That would take a full .44 mag load, if it were chambered for one.

     

    But GUESSING about chamber pressures that single actions will handle, or ASSUMING an automatic pistol load safely works in them, is about the worst mistake you can make in loading for SASS games.  Check pressure limits - they are easy to find.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
  18. That Keith design (I have one of the Lyman 429666 molds) is great except for the forward driving band CAN on some tight barrels/chambers be a jam fit into the chamber.  Never know until you try some in any particular gun.  And it does not have Big Lube grooves....mine would run out of lube with real BP in a 20" barrel.

     

     

    BTW - Natchez discount code good till 11/21 midnight EST for 10% off orders over $100 =>  P231120

     

    GJ

  19. Natchez Shooter Supply often sends me various coupons good for about 2-3 days by email.  Just sign up with them.   Ranges from 10% off anything, to free shipping, to reduced or free Hazmat.  Varies by what they want to move most.  Sign up at their web site.

     

    Saeco does not make ANY Big Lube style BP bullet molds.   Great molds, just not the large lube grooves.

     

    Might look at Accurate Molds - their Aluminum custom made molds are head and shoulders above the soft metal that Lee molds are made in.   Might look at their 173 grain with a RNFP and big lube groove - #43-173C

    https://www.accuratemolds.com/bullet_detail.php?bullet=43-173C

     

    You can specify the exact as-cast band diameter you want when you order the mold.  And the number of cavities, even the mold block material (including iron).

     

    They have a few others that use the original nose design with no driving band in front of the crimp groove, which will usually fit in any 44-40 gun without jamming the nose in the barrel lands.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

     

     

  20. And I use a .45 auto rim roll crimp die.    And I respect most single action's pressure limits (about 14,000 psi) rather than try to make a .45 auto load (21,000 psi).

    HP-38 (which is also Win 231) will be decent.  Win WST works real well, and Bullseye does too.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Thanks 1
  21. 18 hours ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

     At the bottom, it need a nice tasty 45 (or so) degree bevel filed onto the carrier side.

     

    For a clear way to state this, the bevel goes into the top edge of the mortise, just under where the bolt channel is in the frame.   That way, as the carrier rises, there is no part of the frame that can catch the rim of the cartridge.   Remember as you look at the Pioneer Gun Works photos of this fix, the photos have been taken from the bottom of the frame (looking up into the lifter shaft).  

     

    good luck, GJ

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