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Garrison Joe, SASS #60708

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Posts posted by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708

  1. 2 hours ago, Larsen E. Pettifogger, SASS #32933 said:

    The rings in the bore do not look like rings a lot of CAS shooters talk about.  I.e., a double  squib charge and the barrel got "ringed."  They look like machine marks.

    There is no machine that makes a circular mark across both the lands and the grooves of a barrel at the same spot in the barrel.

     

    The bore (what becomes the lands) is cut with a deep hole drill and, if lucky, is precision reamed after that.  Those give mostly circular marks on the lands. 

     

    But the grooves are cut or swaged with a broaching type tool that runs lengthwise down the barrel, with a twist of the cutting head to give the twist rate.  That tooling leaves just lengthwise marks, and sometimes chatter marks across the grooves, but only in the grooves. 

     

    So, completely circular rings in the barrel on both the lands and grooves do not come from any of the cutting operations that Ruger would perform.  

     

    Look at the rings - they cross both the lands AND the grooves at the same exact spot down the barrel.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 2
  2. The new Ruger handguns I have bought come with 2 (TWO) fired cases each.  Hardly enough to leave that much fouling.  And certainly nothing that would put circular defects or rings in both the lands and grooves of a barrel.  Even if Ruger retains 2 or 3 cases (which they have never said they do), that is not enough in my experience to foul a barrel that badly.  And I am even more certain that Ruger does not provide fired cases to individual states' Crime Forensics departments without evidence that a crime has been committed.   (That is why police are SO dedicated to picking up any fired cases from any crime scene - they have to get their own cases.)

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
  3. 13 minutes ago, johnmuir2013 said:

    Here are a couple better photos.

     

    Those show very clearly that the color deposited on  the lands is copper (gilding metal ) fouling! 

     

    Keep copies of all your photos shown so far.   The gun dealer should be smart enough to realize you know what you are talking about, but you may have to double down in this age of denying of all responsibility in any thing that goes wrong.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 2
  4. Guns are made from 410 series stainless steel.  This family of alloys CAN rust.  As can a family of cheaper knife blades, 440 SS.  The SS alloys folks are more used to, like 316 SS, are much more resistant to rust.  The word stainless or stain-resistant is quite accurate.  Thinking that means stain proof or rust proof, is wrong.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 2
    • Thanks 1
  5. Looks to me from the grainy photos that this is copper fouling on the lands from jacketed rounds already fired.   The very few reddish streaks that occur in the grooves of the barrel run lengthwise down the barrel.   Rust would not create a uniform narrow streak in the middle of a groove.  That copper fouling on the lands would not concern me, in itself.  But I doubt Ruger would have shipped the gun without cleaning the fouling out of the barrel!  This gun has been shot and is not new.

     

    The "rings" are not what would be expected on a new barrel, for sure.  Because these marks are uniformly occurring on both the groove and the land sections of the barrel, this could not have been a manufacturing defect, most likely, but was caused by squibbed (stuck)  bullets "shot into" with regular power loads fired behind the stuck bullets.   If they are deep-enough rings to hurt accuracy, you would feel it if you pushed a tight cleaning patch both directions in the barrel.  The cleaning rod would jump forward slightly at some points in the stroke - an uneven amount of pressure needed to move the cleaning rod and patch.

     

    If you indeed have rings which moved the barrel metal out in several spots, this would also say this was not a NEW gun, and more importantly,  that a customer abused the gun and ringed the barrel, then returned it to the gun shop.   That certainly should be remedied by the seller (or manufacturer if needed) - provide an actual new gun to replace this used one.

     

    I'd suggest, though, that you not clean the gun or do any other work on it until you get action from the gun dealer, or perhaps Ruger themselves.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

     

     

     

    • Like 8
    • Thanks 2
  6. The poster has already established HIS Stoeger has way more lever travel required to open it than normal..  If he just takes the travel (opening angle) back to what the factory standard angle is, and still has lots of engagement, he may have no problem with it opening on recoil.   Any of this work is risky, yes, but the OP has already shown us that he has the metal working skills to understand and fix the lock opening problem should it occur. And that he knows how to test for tendencies of the action to open on firing.

     

    This is not something I would recommend for a first-time tuner to attempt.

     

    My GUESS is that the factory did not properly fit the sliding lock engagement properly when they built it  (leaving too much metal engagement).

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
  7. Since you seem new to the game, I'd advise you find a good cowboy gunsmith.  You don't have enough info to really tell you "Oh, wave this magic wand and repeat this phrase 3 times"

     

    Here's some good gunsmiths in the FAQ:

    SASS gunsmiths

     

    good luck, GJ

     

     

    10 hours ago, Walter said:

    Anyway, I went over the body and cylinder with Flitz, and that seemed to help. 

     

    No way that fixed a lockup of the trigger or cylinder.

     

    GJ

  8. Take a look at the sliding bar in the barrel locking section.  Two cross bars there, one engages the front and the other the back lug on the barrel.  Remove some metal from the front edge of the bar that "lets go" of it's barrel lug last - that is the one causing the long travel.

     

    Go slow, maybe three steps of removing metal and reassembly and test firing it each time with a factory level load.  You don't want to see the action opening after a round is shot.   Don't taper the top or bottom of the lock slide - that would just encourage recoil to auto-open the sliding lock.

     

    Realize that Stoeger will not factory repair the gun after you have done serious modification to it.  Not that Stoeger/Boito ever does much work on their guns anyway, though.   With a bent top lever and lightened spring, sounds like that horse is already out of the barn.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
  9. I've got a 1970 made Mossberg 500 shotgun, 12 gauge 3" magnum, running now 50 years, aluminum receiver (but the action locks into a steel barrel extension).  Runs as smooth and tight as it ever did. 

     

    With a proper  design, aluminum works fine in a receiver - EXCEPT for the fact that scratches, modifications, damage usually means a paint/coating of the repair since you can't cold or hot blue it.  At least the lever (a part that works hard) is steel.    If AL receiver lets Winchester (probably Miroku) make a gun that can compete price wise with a Henry with an aluminum frame, so be it.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

     

     

     

    • Like 1
  10. Epoxy on a primer cup (no compound or anvil).  Small primer is usually large enough.  If you use a brass cup, it polishes nicely to almost gold.   A nickel plated cup - polishes to nickel.   Doh.  Cheap and fast. 

     

    Otherwise, a proper shank size and globe size of a shotgun bead will work well.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 3
    • Thanks 1
  11. The rumors of financial failure and abrupt layoff of a majority of employees at Expansion Industries site, supposedly from first hand accounts, caught my attention the most.  Exp Ind is the firm which the original question was about.  

     

    White River Energetics is totally different company, AFAIK.   Based in Arkansas, not Texas.   Don't conflate them.  GJ

    • Like 1
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  12. I've read weakly-authenticated articles that the Expansion Industries effort in Texas  failed, and even read rumors that the undertaking was a ruse or scam.

     

    With American primer production for reloading now apparently getting back on line, I look forward to obtaining Winchester and Remington primers in the near future.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 4
  13. SAAMI specs hold the dimensions of sizing dies pretty consistent between different manufacturers. 

     

    Now, the .45 auto (sometimes called .45 ACP) sizer does do a lot more sizing than a .45 Colt sizer does, overworking the case that originally was a .45 Colt (having thicker case walls than a .45 auto).  That is why I use a .45 Colt sizer in my die set for the Cowboy 45 Special cartridge,  it sizes close to 0.480, not 0.473" OD.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Thanks 1
  14. 21 minutes ago, Sarge said:

     

    Starline suggested heating the cases up to about 450-475 degrees for 15 minutes.

     

    That was an attempt by Starline to have you anneal the cases.  If they told you to put them in an oven to do this, they gave poor advice, IMO.  You annealed the case heads as well as the body of the case, softening the case all over.  That can lead to case failures at the head with high pressures. 

     

    Fortunately, Cowboy 45 Special is designed to be a very low pressure wild cat, so you may never have a case loaded for SASS use that fails with pressure.  And also fortunately, there are commercially made case annealers that properly apply the heat needed to anneal cartridge cases without softening the case head.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

     

    • Like 3
  15. Different by brand?  Only Starline makes C45Spl cases, by exclusive agreement with original commercial developer.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 1
  16. I have many more purchased Starline Cowboy 45 Special cases split than I do old .45 Colt cases which I have cut down.    NOT much better to buy, in my experience.  And I've been shooting them 10 years now,.  All get loaded the same - the Starline cases just do not seem to be properly annealed at factory.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 2
    • Thanks 2
  17. You all know, of course, that it would not take a complete printer-set-up match book to be printed to update a few of the stage instructions.    Reprint those pages with the new instructions and pass those out to the PMs and post one copy on the affected loading table for the stage(s).    Done.   I do COMPLETE 6 stage descriptions for local matches in less than 15 minutes on my ink jet printer.  Staple or tape them in match books for the PMs if you have to.

     

    When posse walk-throughs are done the evening before the match starts, there is time to get any revisions printed out and checked, especially when additional notes come from discussions during the walk-through.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 2
  18. Altered instructions given at marshal walk through, since they are not in writing, really depend upon accurate recall by posse marshals at the time of every stage-start over 3 days and in high pressure situations.   It is likely that instructions which make actions more restricted than what is in the handbook sometimes get "conveniently ignored."  Our posse marshal made sure we followed the revised instructions as presented in the walkthrough.

     

    Perhaps for big matches, final stage instructions as discussed in the walk through should be posted at EACH loading table with the changes which are to be followed HIGHLIGHTED.  As well as the posse marshals all provided a revised set of stage instructions before match begins.   There were some 35 or so folks in an outdoor setting for the posse marshal walkthrough, with some no longer blessed with perfect hearing.   What would you really expect?  Time at big matches exists to do this well - we ought to do it.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 9
    • Thanks 2
  19. I shoot early shift on Saturday.  I'd offer to pick you up after 11 AM from visitor parking and drop you where you want to set up, if that works for you.  Otherwise, ask the shoot for one of the rangers to come get you with a 4 wheeler (cart).

     

    If you want me to shuttle you, PM me for my phone # and provide me yours so we can connect after my early shift shoot. 

     

    If you have connections with pards before 11, then a ranger is probably the way to get where you need to go.

     

    good luck, GJ

    • Like 4
    • Thanks 2
  20. Some molds need special care to keep the sprue plate or the blocks at the right temperature for best bullets.    Some that I bottom pour need to hit the bevel of the fill hole through the sprue plate.  Some need to be poured right down the hole.   Some want to be 50- 100 deg F hotter alloy than other bullets cast from same alloy.   Some want fan cooling during casting blowing on the blocks.  I find each one has different concerns.

     

    GJ

    • Thanks 2
  21. In the Cast Bullet Association newsletters there are published match results which record the group sizes and awards earned with both bottom pour and hand ladled cast bullets in a variety of guns and calibers.   Used to be most of the winners were hand ladling their slugs.   Not any more (last 10 years), more of the winners are bottom pouring.

     

    It seems to me there are no consistent accuracy differences.   Time savings are pretty large using a good bottom pour pot with accurate temperature control.

     

    Fellow's shooting ability will rule the roost, however.

     

    good luck, GJ

     

     

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