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Subdeacon Joe

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Posts posted by Subdeacon Joe

  1. The F-227 Specter

     

    The Specter was designed in the 1980s to excel in stealth and agility, featuring a distinctive faceted design to minimize radar cross-section. It was equipped with the latest avionics and weapon systems of its time, ensuring it can engage targets effectively while remaining undetected. 

     

    The Specter also boasts an impressive climb rate and service ceiling, allowing it to operate above most threats. 

     

    Its internal weapon bays maintain the aircraft’s stealth profile while carrying a formidable payload.

     

    This aircraft was retired in the early 2000s, and is on display at the Castle Air Museum in Atwater, California.

     

    FB_IMG_1719456330227.jpg.dee4661f0c6b461be72c1057beff5c9d.jpg

    • Haha 2
  2. 14 minutes ago, Rip Snorter said:

    Think of what your ammo weighs, any of these much larger and heavier.  Think of the rate of fire, even of the Bofors, the slowest of the group.  100 rounds of 50 cal is 35 lbs!

     

    That's why I said a few hundred pounds.   Say, 600 pounds. Likely wouldn't have  much effect on speed. 

     

    And for 20mm

     

    Screenshot_20240626_171847_Chrome.thumb.jpg.a76901587cccf072b872a8adfef50d39.jpg

     

    You can get a fair amount of both .50 caliber and 20mm for 600 pounds. 

    • Like 1
  3. "A deckload of U.S. Army Air Force Republic P-47N Thunderbolt fighters on the flight deck of the escort carrier USS Casablanca (CVE-55) in 16 July 1945. The planes were loaded at Naval Air Station Alameda, California (USA) and were bound for Guam. July 16 1945"

     

    FB_IMG_1719444945439.thumb.jpg.cbd2320c9e8b84dc7c3af7607a301707.jpg

     

    Likely all or most were scrapped before squadron service. 

    • Like 2
    • Thanks 2
  4. 2 hours ago, Rye Miles #13621 said:

    Well I guess I didn’t read  far enough into the website.

     

    That might be in the FAQs, but I asked the Site Bot.  The text in the black box is my question,  which I see has typos in it.

     

    That was easier than trying to sift through all the dross.

    1 hour ago, Sgt. C.J. Sabre, SASS #46770 said:

    Once again I find myself in agreement with Alpo.

     

    What an appalling state of affairs!

    • Like 1
    • Haha 4
  5. 1 hour ago, Rye Miles #13621 said:

    https://byrna.com

     

    Have you heard of this? My question is how long does the CO2 cartridge last? I have a Colt SAA BB gun made by Numarex and it takes a CO 2 cartrdge. That cartrdige doesn't last very long. Maybe a couple weeks whether I shoot it or not. If you're carrying one of these Byrnas will you depend on the CO2 cartridge let alone the projectile itself? Interesting alternative for carrying a real firearm though. 

     

    Per the bot on their website:

     
     
     

     

    says:I get one. I put in the CO2 cartridge. I don't shoot it. How long before the CO2 bleeds out?

     

     

    Byrna Bot

     
    Byrna Bot says:It sounds like you're curious about the CO2 cartridge. Byrna CO2 cartridges have a virtually indefinite shelf life. The Byrna incorporates puncture technology to allow it to fire on the first trigger pull. The cartridge is not pierced until the trigger is pulled so you can always keep an un-punctured CO2 cartridge in your Byrna to maximize its utility for self-defense. We recommend loading a new CO2 cartridge after every sustained use of the Byrna because once the cartridge is punctured CO2 will leak out over a 24-48 hour period. If your launcher uses 8 gram cylinders, we recommend using ONLY Byrna 8 gram cylinders as 8 gram cylinders are not a standard size and many aftermarket 8 gram cylinders WILL NOT function properly. If your launcher uses 12 gram, you can use most standard 12 gram cylinders*. *Byrna does not recommend the use of Crosman brand 12 gram CO2 cylinders in your launcher as they may not puncture correctly.'
    • Thanks 2
  6. The Elco "Thunderbolt" turret represented a significant upgrade in the firepower of PT boats, which were small, fast attack craft used extensively by the U.S. Navy during World War II. Here's a detailed overview of the Elco Thunderbolt turret and its iterations:

    Elco Thunderbolt Turret Overview:

    1. Design and Operation:
       - The Thunderbolt was a single-person, electrically powered turret designed to enhance the offensive capabilities of PT boats.
       - The turret allowed for rapid and precise aiming, increasing the effectiveness of the boat's firepower against enemy aircraft, small boats, and coastal targets.

    2. Armament Configurations:
       - Early Iterations:
         - The initial version of the Thunderbolt turret combined two Oerlikon 20mm cannons with six M2 .50 caliber heavy machine guns. This mix provided a versatile and formidable array of weapons capable of engaging various threats.
       - Additional Configurations:
         - Some configurations tested included four Oerlikon 20mm cannons paired with two M2 .50 caliber machine guns.
         - Another setup involved solely four Oerlikon 20mm cannons, emphasizing heavy anti-aircraft and anti-surface firepower.

    3. Deployment and Usage:
       - The Thunderbolt turret was quickly employed on PT boats, significantly boosting their combat capabilities.
       - However, these upgrades came towards the end of World War II, resulting in limited combat use. The enhanced PT boats saw some action but did not have a significant impact on the overall naval engagements due to the late deployment.

    Impact:

    While the Elco Thunderbolt turret represented a technological advancement in PT boat armament, its limited deployment time meant it had little opportunity to influence the war's outcome significantly. Nevertheless, it showcased the ongoing innovation in naval warfare technology and the continuous efforts to improve combat effectiveness.

     

    FB_IMG_1719421185572.thumb.jpg.7fa640b89a8ba6a64f8f425d9f5fcac8.jpg

    • Like 3
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  7. The interior aircraft hangar of the light cruiser USS Honolulu (CL-48). Like other Brooklyn class cruisers, Honolulu operated four aircraft, generally the Curtis SOC Seagull floatplane. 

     

    After aircraft were lowered through the hatch seen near the top of the photo, they would be deposited on trolleys. These trolleys were then pushed via a system of rails to move the aircraft to their section of the hanger. 

     

    Of particular interest in the photo are the fold-down racks along the walls. Plenty of comfortable accommodations for the crew who love to drift off the sleep to the smell of avgas.

     

    FB_IMG_1719419034987.thumb.jpg.b8ac741e9e89c46ec966e2608d3ab38e.jpg

    • Thanks 2
  8. Top 10 - Best Remarks by Golf Caddies
    #10
    Golfer: "Think I'm going to drown myself in the lake."
    Caddy: "Think you can keep your head down that long?"
    #9
    Golfer: "I'd move heaven and earth to break 100 on this course."
    Caddy: "Try heaven, you've already moved most of the earth."
    #8
    Golfer: "Do you think my game is improving?"
    Caddy: "Yes sir, you miss the ball much closer now."
    #7
    Golfer: "Do you think I can get there with a 5 iron?"
    Caddy: "Eventually."
    #6
    Golfer: "You've got to be the worst caddy in the world."
    Caddy: "I don't think so sir. That would be too much of a coincidence."
    #5
    Golfer: "Please stop checking your watch all the time. It's too much of a distraction."
    Caddy: "It's not a watch - it's a compass."
    #4
    Golfer: "How do you like my game?"
    Caddy: "Very good sir, but personally, I prefer golf."
    #3
    Golfer: "Do you think it's a sin to play on Sunday?
    Caddy: "The way you play, sir, it's a sin on any day."
    #2
    Golfer: "This is the worst course I've ever played on."
    Caddy: "This isn't the golf course. We left that an hour ago."
    and the #1 best caddy comment:
    Golfer: "That can't be my ball, it's too old."
    Caddy: "It's been a long time since we teed off, sir."
    • Thanks 1
    • Haha 5
  9. 7 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

     

     

    You're A person is supposed to be somewhere Friday morning to meet someone.  You That person leaves Tuesday for the 2,000 mile drive.  You That person break down Thursday morning, 500 miles out.  Repair shop can't get the part needed until Monday.  You That person calls whoever it was and says, "I broke down and I'm STUCK here until Monday night, after the part comes in Monday morning, be there Tuesday."  

    On your Someone on the way to work there's a pile up, traffic at a standstill.  No way to get to an exit to take another way.  You He or she calls into work, "Hey, Boss!  There's a pile up on 405, I'm STUCK in traffic."  Or, you a person have has to take a family member to the ER, calls into work, "Hey, Boss!  I had to take someone to the ER, I'm STUCK here until we get test results or (name) is admitted."

    In none of those cases is it stated, implied, or hinted at that you will be there forever, the way you are insisting that the word "stuck" means.  Just that you someone are is forced to stay, linger, dwell someplace longer than intended.

     

     

    There, @Colorado Coffinmaker , I think I made it non-specific enough even to satisfy your punctiliousness.
    Guess this song should be "Still Stuck In Lodi" since "stuck" means one can never leave.

     

  10. 2 hours ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

    The Strainer isn't "Stuck" at the ISS forever.

     

     

    You're supposed to be somewhere Friday morning to meet someone.  You leave Tuesday for the 2,000 mile drive.  You break down Thursday morning, 500 miles out.  Repair shop can't get the part needed until Monday.  You call whoever it was and say, "I broke down and I'm STUCK here until Monday night, after the part comes in Monday morning, be there Tuesday."  

    On your way to work there's a pile up, traffic at a standstill.  No way to get to an exit to take another way.  You call into work, "Hey, Boss!  Theres a pile up on 405, I'm STUCK in traffic."  Or, you have to take a family member to the ER, call into work, "Hey, Boss!  I had to take someone to the ER, I'm STUCK here until we get test results or (name) is admitted."

    In none of those cases is it stated, implied, or hinted at that you will be there forever, the way you are insisting that the word "stuck" means.  Just that you are forced to stay, linger, dwell someplace longer than intended.

    • Like 3
  11. 18 hours ago, Alpo said:

    "Now this is coffee regular. That means milk and two sugars."

     

     

    How much milk?  Two drops?  Half a pint?  A pint of milk and two drops of coffee?  Not enough information for your claim of  "hot milk and sugar."  For that matter, what kind of coffee?  One of those over-roasted robusta blends that tastes like straight quinine?  How was it brewed?

  12. 26 minutes ago, Bailey Creek,5759 said:

    Beginning of a new Grand Canyon?

     

    Different mechanisms. Grand Canyon was formed by uplift and erosion,  the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is new material being brought to surface:

     

    "Mid-ocean ridges occur along divergent plate boundaries, where new ocean floor is created as the Earth’s tectonic plates spread apart. As the plates separate, molten rock rises to the seafloor, producing enormous volcanic eruptions of basalt. "

  13. I have the .22 Short version. Same thing, no extractor.

     

    BUT.....

     

    You don't insert the magazine and work the slide to load and chamber a round.   

    Insert the magazine,  hit the lever to tip up the barrel, insert loose round into the chamber.  The manual says to load the chamber  then insert the magazine. I don't like manipulating it with a  round in the  chamber. It does mention pulling back the slide as another way,  but since Beretta put the barrel tip first,  I figure that is the preferred method. 

     

    There isn't a whole lot to hold onto. 

     

    20240624_165033.thumb.jpg.dd25770635ef99b764c4791418c1f958.jpg

     

    The manual:

    https://www.berettaweb.com/Munuals/950 series.pdf

    • Like 1
  14. 13 minutes ago, Alpo said:

    And of course we have math question number seven. Why would they have a question using metrics in an American arithmetic class in 1895?

     

    1.) Dealing with European businesses. 

    2.) Demonstrating that the student knows how to convert units 

    • Like 1
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