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Cholla Hill Tirador

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    Shortgrass Rangers

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    North Texas
  • Interests
    CAS, High Power Competition, Reloading, Bullet Casting, Elk & Deer Hunting and most of all, Fiddle Playing.

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  1. I have no doubt that some dealers ship UPS or FedEx ground and just don't tell the shipper it's a handgun. When I had an FFL I used my USPS account and used medium Flat Rate boxes to ship handguns for less than $15 excluding insurance. I'd print the shipping label at home, walk up to the counter at the Post Office, hand them the box with the label already on it along with a Form 1508, and turn around a walk out. Super cheap, super easy.
  2. Shippers such as UPS and FedEx require expedited (expensive) shipping. The cheapest way is USPS Flat Rate Priority Mail but for some reason so few dealers ship handguns that way.
  3. I almost made up my mind to offer you my Uberti 32-20. Then I went to get the lawnmower out of the shop...saw the tray of loaded 32-20 ammunition sitting there on the bench, shot most of them and had a change of heart. BUT, all is not lost. I bought mine from Dixie Gun Works last November when they were on sale for $450. Well guess what? They're on sale again for the same price! Contrary to their description, mine has the wide rear and front sight, and came with the 4-click hammer with the pivoting hammer block, is timed perfectly, and is close to the best fitted and finished Uberti I've ever owned.
  4. When I got into SA shooting at beyond 25 yds., I spent lots of time bending front sights because all my revolvers shot to the left, or so I thought, ... same as most everyone else's. It has/had nothing to do with the revolvers, but my lack of the application of a principle known as follow though. I actually learned this in High Power competition, but never thought to apply it to revolver shooting. It basically means allowing the firearm to physically "do its thing" after the sear breaks, and not influencing with various pressures on the grip and trigger. A handgun silhouette shooter said to think of your handgun as a flintlock with a veeeery slow lock time. The idea is to NOT move or influence the revolver between the time the sear breaks and the bullet exits the barrel. It's not difficult to do, it just takes concentration. Here's a pretty good write-up on the subject- Follow Through in Pistol Shooting Regarding grip, somewhere between a death grip and limp wristing, but always consistent. Cholla
  5. I cast this bullet which weighs around 220 grs. for my 1866 Sporting Rifle in 44-40- It has plenty of lube capacity for loading BP, and I've used it with both BP and smokeless. Plenty accurate for deer to at least 200 yds, IF you're good at range estimation. I load 9.5 grs. of Unique, Power Pistol or Herco and get right around 1300 fps with any of the three, same velocity, and accuracy with a case full of Swiss 3Fg. . A couple of years ago I whacked a buck with this load and he died right away with no complaints. The bullet sailed on through for parts unknown, so I don't think another couple hundred fps would've made a bit of difference. Cholla
  6. Howdy Cholla

     

    I saw your post on the SASS Wire wanting dillon 550 tool head and .38/.357 dies. I have a new in the box Lee 3 die carbide set in .38, used dillion tool head and maybe a cartridge conversion kit, but I will have to check to see if I have an extra conversion kit. I have to go out of town tomorrow and will not be able to check what all I have until I get back in town on Sun. If you are interested, send me a message.

     

    Regards,

    Safecracker

  7. I NOE 432421 in a 4-cavity and it casts great bullets, but they weigh almost 260 grs., if that matters to you. Also, they're currently out of stock and I've found that sometimes it takes quite awhile for them to get moulds back in stock. As others have said, Tom at Accurate moulds is a great person with whom to deal. He cuts moulds when they're ordered, you have your choice of iron, brass or aluminum, and the number of designs in his catalog is mind boggling. Accurate-.44-moulds He's a little higher than NOE but his moulds are works of art and for no additional charge you he will modify the design of any mould to meet your requirements, if you wish. Cholla
  8. Thanks for the kind words, guys. The finish is BLO cut 3-1 with pure gun turpentine, no stain is used at all. The process takes weeks, sometimes months if the oil is slow drying and is definitely a labor of love. I strip the stock with the stuff from the hardware that would exfoliate an elephant. After whiskering the stock, using 1" squares of wet/dry sandpaper dipped in the oil mix, I sand the stock beginning with 220 grit, then 320, then finally 400 three to four times with each grit, allowing it to dry for 30 minutes before sloppily wiping it off with paper towels . The sand paper removes almost no wood, but makes a sort of mud that fills the grain. After each round of sandpaper, I let the stock dry. After the final round with 400 grit, I apply a tiny amount of the oil to the stock and rub it in with the heel of my hand and let each coat completely dry. I have no idea how many coats I apply, but it is a bunch. I stop when I like the looks of the stock. This one actually didn't turn out as good as the others I have done as the oil didn't seem to want to dry, and I can't figure out why. Maybe BLO get old or something. I've been using the same can for years. Several years ago I did a stock on a '70 vintage Ruger 77. That stock had all the beauty of a mud fence, but refinishing it as described above, it took on a pretty, deep look and exposed grain that I had no idea was there. Ditto for an old Ruger 10-22 that my Dad bought me when I was a kid: Before: After: Redleg, coming over there and shooting is never far from my mind. I have a full set of ancient 38-40's I want to come shoot with BP, but I have to get some more brass and some more BP! Cholla
  9. Factory finish- After stripping and hand rubbing in linseed oil-
  10. I love using old and reproductions of the old firearms for hunting. This 131 year old '73 Winchester in 38-40 worked perfectly this year. Was loaded with 1.9cc of Swiss 3Fg under a home-cast 192 gr. FP cast from ordinary wheelweights. Last seasons take with the pictured Bisley in 45 Colt. Both were right at 50 yds. out and taken with a cast bullet handload. (A little luck helps with shots like these!) This little Uberti has been a wonderful hunting arm for me. This old '97 got me a limit of the little gray rockets. Cholla
  11. I guess it's a good thing nobody told the owners of 1886 Winchester 45-70's not to shoot RN bullets in them for the last 130 years.
  12. If it helps with your decision, I sold a 3rd Generation Colt 4 3/4" .44 Special and kept a like configured Uberti. Absolutely no functional difference and the Uberti has provided yeoman service, especially in the field! Good luck in your quest. Cholla
  13. Dang right they're out there.... ...not even close to for sale, though. Regarding the strength of the 1873 action, I've not seen a single documented case of an action destroyed, but over on the CAS forum there are a couple of pics of toggle link actions that were over loaded. In each case, the action survived intact, the barrel, not so much.
  14. Excellent. thanks for the help!

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