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I have a rattlesnake question


Alpo

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We have the diamondback rattlesnake. We have both the Eastern diamondback and the western diamondback. Now my question is, does any other species of snake have the diamond pattern?

 

Sometime ago Hardpan told the lovely story about finding a snike in his Volkswagen. Upon being questioned - what kind of snike - he replied, AN ARGYLE SNIKE.

 

As you can see by this man's sweater, an argyle pattern is diamonds.

b90dcf28ace30427ecc0e31131cec278.jpg

 

At the end of his story, someone was about to kill the snike, when a snike lover came along and persuaded them to let him have it. And he walks off, happily, down the street, with the snike twined around his neck.

 

It was a great story, and I enjoyed it immensely. But the only snake I'm aware of that has a diamond pattern is a diamondback rattlesnake. And the thought of walking down the street with a diamondback coiled around my neck is frightening.

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"Argyle" can be any one of many different patterns.  Not necessarily "diamond."  Turning the more common argyle pattern slightly askew from the vertical results is multiple little squares and bigger squares.  The original pattern comes from Scotland.

Edited by Colorado Coffinmaker
Piddle around
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1 minute ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

Gopher Snakes have a diamond-ish pattern.  Not quite as distinct as on rattlesnakes, but close.  Diamondback Watersnakes.

Yep, Gopher Snakes can cause some excitement when found in the wrong places. 

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2 hours ago, Chickasaw Bill SASS #70001 said:

time for the 3 S rule 

 

  shoot 

 shovel 

SHUT UP 

 

  CB 

If he had shot it he would have blown a hole in his car. It was in the trunk. The guy that was finally going to kill it was going to beat it to death with a stick.

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Gopher snake. Evolved the diamond pattern so that predators would think he was a rattlesnake and leave him alone. Can flatten his head, so he looks like a pit viper.

 

Well, posing like this

Great-Basin-Gopher-Snake.jpg

Would probably make a feral house cat leave him alone. But it looks like a real good way to get shot to me.

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In the SE while working for Ga-Pacific, I ran into eastern diamondbacks, timber and canebrakes.  I never saw a pigmy but they were probably there.

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This would be the summer of 73. I was a junior assistant scoutmaster - was 17 - and we hiked to summer camp that year. We had done several five and 10 mile hikes previously, and the first day of this trip we did 22 miles, which gave us our 20 miler, so we all qualified for hiking merit badge. That's the only merit badge I ever got. And since summer camp was 78 miles away, we did 56 more miles, which qualified us for the 50-miler award.

 

About day three we have stopped for lunch. Just some woods at the side of the road. And there was a pile of pine cones. So after lunch a bunch of the boys were running and jumping in this pile of pine cones. Like you would jump in a pile of leaves.

 

After about 10 minutes of that it's scoutmaster told them they needed to get back on the road, so they picked up their packs in the way they went, and I hung back for a little bit to help get the lunch gear in the van, and I glanced down at that pile of pine cones. Pygmy rattlesnake come crawling out from it.

 

I love the out of doors. :D

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When I worked in south Georgia for four years, I saw the largest rattlesnake I had ever seen.....An old gentleman had killed it and placed it into the back of his truck.  I didn't measure it, but he said it was 5'3" long (not as long as can be), and weighed a well-tapered 23 pounds......I ran over one in the roadway that was like running over a large pine limb......And they really stink when they are skinned out.......

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7 hours ago, Alpo said:

If he had shot it he would have blown a hole in his car. It was in the trunk. The guy that was finally going to kill it was going to beat it to death with a stick.

One time on Camp Lejune we were out in the field, when all of a sudden our Navy Corpsman come running out of the woods. When we finally got him settled down, we asked what he was running from.

"Well, I saw this snake, so I picked up a tree branch to beat it with, but it turned out that the snake was just another tree branch." he told us.

"So why are you running like that?" I asked him. 

"The tree branch I picked up turned out to be a snake!"

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Bull snakes look so much like rattlers, that even many outdoorsmen mistake them for Rattlers... They often grow to more than 4.5 feet in length...

And are known to kill smaller Rattlers...

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The pattern actually helps them blend in with their surroundings. Here in Arizona I have seen Western Diamondbacks with slight color variations depending on the native vegetation. Darker green at higher elevations and lighter colors in the deserts.

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On 6/16/2024 at 8:23 AM, Pat Riot said:

Here’s a link with 13 diamond patterned snakes. Most are rattlers but a couple are not. 
https://wildlifeinformer.com/snakes-with-diamond-patterns/


Mohave Green nasty  nope ropes , When I lived in AZ had a 12 year old bit by one , parents looked for snake (wrongly) then went to ER in the 45 mins to a hour between kid died 

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We have 13 species of rattlesnakes here in Arizona. The western diamondback has the most diamond shape of all I have seen. The Mojave is often mistaken for a western diamondback, and vice versa, but the pattern on the Mojave is often broken. I am working on a Mojave hatband as we speak. The first 4-5" has no breaks at all, so it is like one long stripe. The western diamondback has a 50/50 white and black coontail while the Mojave has a 2/3-1/3 white and black coontail. We also have the Arizona Black and the Blacktailed. So far, I think I'm at six Mojaves this season.

 

Blacktail

VXVS9979.JPG

 

Mojave "Green"

IMG_3585.JPG

 

Arizona Black

IMG_0696.JPG

 

Western Diamondback.

IMG_1640.JPG

Edited by Cholla
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On 6/17/2024 at 11:04 AM, PowderRiverCowboy said:


Mohave Green nasty  nope ropes , When I lived in AZ had a 12 year old bit by one , parents looked for snake (wrongly) then went to ER in the 45 mins to a hour between kid died 

That’s terrible. :(

 

Mojave Greens are aggressive as hell. So are Water Moccasins. They will come for you. 
I will avoid them, but if they come for me they die. 
I had a Mojave change direction 90 degrees to come at us when camping/shooting on BLM land outside Apple Valley, CA.

My coachgun shredded the sonofasnake.

My friend’s son kept the rattle. 5 segments. The snake was about 36” long. 
 

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