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Civil War sleeve insignia question


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Unimportant but annoying: I can't for the life of me remember the term for the looping, decorative insignia at the cuff of a Civil War officer's coat.

If memory serves, the number of lines making up the design denotes rank ... but this is an old memory, and like my recollection of the fuel crossover switch on startup checklist of a B17, old memory does not equal accurate memory!
My Google-fu fails me entirely, thus my deference to those with a greater breadth and depth of knowledge than myself!

What is that rascally sleeve decoration called?

(It's at the end of the sleeve, not the shoulder ... a local re-enactor could only think of chevrons and that's not what I'm remembering!)

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Aiguillette.

 

Just now, Capt. R. Hugh Kidnme said:

Aiguillette.

 

May not be the correct spelling, but close.

 

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 Austrian knot??

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austrian_knot

 

and

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniforms_of_the_Confederate_States_Armed_Forces

The new [CSA] uniforms were designed by Nicola Marschall, a German-American artist who also designed the original Confederate flag. He was heavily influenced by the mid-1800s uniforms of the Austrian and French Armies.

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From the link Cheyenne Ranger provided:

 

Confederate Army officers indicated their military affiliation with different colored facing on their coats or jackets. The colors were red for artillery, yellow for cavalry, light blue for infantry, and black for medical. A very distinctive feature of the Confederate officers' uniforms was the gold braid Austrian knots on their sleeves. More elaborate braiding indicated higher rank and some knots almost reached the shoulder. However, a general order, issued in 1862, called for the Austrian knots not to be worn in the field, as this made officers conspicuous to enemy combatants.”

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1 hour ago, Capt. R. Hugh Kidnme said:

Aiguillette.

 

May not be the correct spelling, but close.

 

That's the loop of rope that hangs around your shoulder, showing that you're an aide to somebody.

 

Aiguillettes-6.jpg

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Yacht club members have a 3 loop strip insignia on their sleeve.

 Officer's have one strip and wear the enblem of their specialty on the upper loop.

Flag Officers: Rear Commodore has  an additional stripe and a gold star in the upper loop, Vice Commodore have another strip and two gold stars placed on the.bottom loops

Commodore have yet another strip and a gold star in each loop

Retired flag officers keep their loops and stripes with the stars removed

 

 The stripe tradition came from the Eoropean and English armies and navies

 

How's that for trivia?

 

 

On 1/6/2024 at 8:56 PM, Bad Bascomb, SASS # 47,494 said:

:ph34r:  

 

vegan.jpg.ad18ad4ab3447b3d81edad51ab5809fd.jpg

H9

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The French also love sleeve insignia

 

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1 hour ago, Pat Riot said:

An easy to distinguish marking that can be seen a ways off so the enemy knows who to shoot first. ;)

 

It was necessary for the men!  With the beards hiding the insignia on the collar there needed to be some other way.

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Ding Ding Ding, the Subdeacon gets the cigar!

Your illustrations are exactly the picture I had in my mind, and this is printed out and saved!

(The Chinese have a saying, "The weakest ink is stronger than the strongest memory!")

My thanks to you all ... a local re-enactor was stumped at my description, and finally suggested "Chevrons" and sent me a photo of his Sergeant-Major chevrons; a career Navy man mentioned the sleeve stripes described by Mud Marine, but he too was left scratching his head at my explanation.

Pat Riot's observation is correct -- the ornate, easily-seen sleeve insignia make a fine "shoot me first" marker, just like musicians' ornate uniforms, which they learned very, very quickly, never to wear in the field -- for the same coldly practical reason Pat Riot spoke of!

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34 minutes ago, Linn Keller, SASS 27332, BOLD 103 said:

Pat Riot's observation is correct -- the ornate, easily-seen sleeve insignia make a fine "shoot me first" marker, just like musicians' ornate uniforms, which they learned very, very quickly, never to wear in the field -- for the same coldly practical reason Pat Riot spoke of!

 

For the lower grade officers the braid wasn't all that easy to see beyond about 50 or 60 yards.  There were other indications of rank, too.  I think it was majors and above had doubled breasted frock coats.  Major Generals had the buttons grouped in twos, Lt. Generals had them in groups of three.  

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Well, insignias or not, if I were a soldier, anyone sitting on a horse amongst foot soldiers would be my target. 


Anyone watch the first episode of Bass Reeves? 

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The technical term is "Soutache",1 row for Lt., 2 rows for Captain 3 rows for Major, Lt Colonel and Colonel and 4 rows for General.

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THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL

As I remember my Elementary School history lesson on the Battle of Bunker Hill I was told that the colonial officers said, “Shot the officers.”

The officers and sergeants were identified by ‘Gorgets.’ They are shiny metal crescent shaped plates worn on the chest, just below the chin, suspended from a chain. I suspect they made good targets.

gorget

[ gawr-jit ]SHOW IPA

noun
  1. a patch on the throat of a bird or other animal, distinguished by its color, texture, etc.

  2. a piece of armor for the throat.

     

    CJ

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