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Mil Dot question


Alpo

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I was just reading an article I was explaining mil dot scopes for dummies. Apparently it wasn't dummy enough, or maybe I just wasn't that interested. But I've got a question.

 

You shoot and you miss, and your instructor tells you, "adjust your mil dot".

 

Does that make any sense?

 

One thing I took away from the dummies article was that it is a type of reticle. And I can't visualize an instructor telling me to "adjust your crosshair" because I missed the target.

 

Saw this on a TV show and I figured at the time that it was the script writer trying to add something that sounded military. But I've wondered.

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A "MIL" is a unit of measurement.  When a first focal plane scope is equipped with a MIL-type reticle, the size of the reticle in the eyepiece will appear to be small when on lower magnification powers and larger when zoomed in (higher magnification).  In this way, a MIL is always a MIL.

The original fixed zoom MIL-DOT scope had a crosshair with dots spaced one MIL apart.

image.png.4159e23cc4014ee14ed657d923d7ac5e.png

Optics with second focal plane reticles, where the reticle stays the same size regardless of magnification, only allow for the spacing to be accurate at one magnification level/power.  A shooter will have to do math if the magnification power is not set to the appropriate position.

 

Today's optics with FFP "Christmas tree"- style reticles will allow a shooter to make changes without having to make any scope adjustments.

image.thumb.png.bbc4d685b0f26b180f334cd620897b23.png

 

With the latter reticle, a shooter can be told an impact was three mils low and three mils right and can then simply use the appropriate "DOT" for a quick follow up shot.

 

Hope that makes sense.

Edited by Chief Rick
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There’s a wee bit of mathemagic involved. Looking through a mill dot scope, a six foot tall person at 1000 yards will be 2 mils in your scope. Using that you can estimate the distance to your target.

 

now some real trivia, the US and NATO countries use 6400 MILS =360°. Soviet bloc uses 6000. Minor difference unless you target is 1000 meters away.

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4 hours ago, Alpo said:

I was just reading an article I was explaining mil dot scopes for dummies. Apparently it wasn't dummy enough, or maybe I just wasn't that interested. But I've got a question.

 

You shoot and you miss, and your instructor tells you, "adjust your mil dot".

 

Does that make any sense?

 

One thing I took away from the dummies article was that it is a type of reticle. And I can't visualize an instructor telling me to "adjust your crosshair" because I missed the target.

 

Saw this on a TV show and I figured at the time that it was the script writer trying to add something that sounded military. But I've wondered.

To actually answer your question. No, that makes no sense at all.

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I tried to adjust my mil dot once. I dropped it. :P
 

Sounds to me like what ever you were watching didn’t have anyone on the film makers staff that had a clue. 
 

Side note: I am not a tactical shooter or an “Operator”.
I don’t care to fool around calculating Mils. I am an MOA type of guy. image.png.7b95896d2a0ddfb87a08f3561431bf2a.png

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17 minutes ago, Pat Riot said:

I tried to adjust my mil dot once. I dropped it. :P
 

Sounds to me like what ever you were watching didn’t have anyone on the film makers staff that had a clue. 
 

Side note: I am not a tactical shooter or an “Operator”.
I don’t care to fool around calculating Mils. I am an MOA type of guy. image.png.7b95896d2a0ddfb87a08f3561431bf2a.png

you don’t need to be a “tactical Timmy”-type to use mil. It really just depends on what sport you’re shooting. BPCR is MOA for example while ELR is all mil. I think PRS is mostly mil but some MOA so it helps to know the conversion (or have a calculometer handy) if you’re getting feedback from a regular and you happen to shoot primarily another discipline. 

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This site used to have a free version of a simulation/game that was a basic tutorial in how it all works: https://www.shooterready.com/basictraining.html

 

I don't know if they still do.  Took you through the terminology, how to use it, how to calculate for wind, and had, I think, 10 different scenarios of a target of a known size (roughly like a B target) at different ranges and with different wind conditions.  I don't remember if there was any up or down hill.

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31 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

This site used to have a free version of a simulation/game that was a basic tutorial in how it all works: https://www.shooterready.com/basictraining.html

 

I don't know if they still do.  Took you through the terminology, how to use it, how to calculate for wind, and had, I think, 10 different scenarios of a target of a known size (roughly like a B target) at different ranges and with different wind conditions.  I don't remember if there was any up or down hill.

 

19 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

To answer your question, no, it doesn't make sense.  It's word salad meant to sound military or tackykool to the knownothings.

 

 

Here's another site that tries to explain mildot https://www.targettamers.com/rifle-scopes/mil-dot-explained/

Thanks Joe. :D

 

I actually used to know most of this stuff. If you don’t use something for decades you tend to forget a lot of things. 

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"is this the person to whom im speaking ?" 

 

my mildot scope came with a written explanation , id have to bring that along to read every time i went to the range to figure out what i had to do - i zero my scope and use kentucky windage to adjust anymore , if we start shooting ill be the guy with the book and yellow pad doing calcs i cant do in my head anymore 

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All you need to do is get a mil dot reticle system (or MOA) with turret adjustments that match MIL.  Then get an FFP scope, or a SFP scope on the right power setting.  
 

the beautiful part of this is that if you are 3 mils low, it doesn’t matter how close or far the target is….or anything else.  You just hold or dial 3 mils….its easy as can be to adjust fire.  Takes the math out of it…..

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