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Gasket query....


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Weather permitting, I plan on replacing the water pump in my '01 Dodge Ram 3.9 V-6 tomorrow.

 

So... it's been a while, but I've changed a bunch of water pumps in my life.  And I've always applied a sealant to the gasket.  But now, it seems that this simple process has become a bit controversial - some say sealant on both sides of the gasket, some say only on one side, and some say DON'T use a sealant.  Heck... Half-Breed Pete sez he recommends something called Gaskacinch.  "We used to use that back in the 'sixties - we liked it 'cuz it had a girl's legs on the label!  Plus it'll stop yer belts from squealing."

 

So, what do y'all do?  And if you used a sealant, which?  I seem to recall using Permatex #2 quite a lot back "in the day."  :rolleyes:

 

 

 

       5ee7-58ee43b3780fa__50611.1678831373.jpg?c=2

 

 

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Okay, so that's one vote for no sealant, and one Uncle Joe (yes, I had an Uncle Joe ~ ace shadetree mechanic!) suggestion.  Except he used cardboard shoe boxes instead of paper bags.  :rolleyes:

 

Keep 'em coming, folks!  ^_^

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Opinion only

 

Totally clean mating surface.

No sealant.

Install most difficult hose first (lets you wiggle the pump to help get hose on) and then slip in the gasket.

Maybe change the idler, timing set while at it if any tick heard.

Good luck with getting that fan clutch off.  Might need a specialty tool.

Better option, drop it off at a good shop. 

 

 

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Most I've changed I used permatex blue rtv, made my own gasket.

 

Just changed a '12 liberty had an o ring.

 

Don't normally use gasket stickem. 

 

But ya can

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I've always used Permatex just be on the safe side. Light coat on both sides, snug up the bolts, have a coffee and tighten to spec. Even it doesn't need sealant, I do anyway. It's a big pain to have to do it twice! I go thin as you don't want squeeze out getting somewhere it shouldn't.

I've had good luck with "Hylamar" (sp) for areas involving oil. It's more of my go to.

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Modern type gaskets are more than a cut piece of paper. They are a multi-layer construction material. If your gasket is a simple paper gasket, use sealant. If the multi-layer type, you don't. If you use sealant, it doesn't have to be a lot. A thin layer will do. 

I'm getting ready to change my differential fluid in my diffs on my Jeep, and the gaskets I got specifically say no sealant needed. 

And I liked cereal boxes for myt homemade gaskets.

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It’s best to follow factory procedure. The wrong sealant can be worse than no sealant at all!!  This is particularly true where electronic sensors are involved.

 

Where “no sealant” is specified, I use a little dab of clean hard grease where I need to hold the gasket in place until the part is positioned properly.  Just a tiny spot or two in a couple of places.

 

With an “O” ring, I use a little of whatever lube is specified and in lieu of a specific recommendation, I’ll use light vegetable oil.

 

Where no gasket is used, apply the manufacturer’s recommended sealer/RTV, again, because of sensors used in whichever system.

 

And cardboard and a gasket hammer and scissors where you’re dealing with an older vehicle or where a factory gasket is not available is a perfectly acceptable solution.  I like “hi-tac” sealant for these situations!

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I’ll explain my comment on the proper sealer where electronics are involved.  
 

Sevral years ago, the auto manufacturers began using various RTV sealers in place of an actual gasket in certain applications.  The assembly line folks used properly measured amounts of the sealers and they were usually allowed to thoroughly cure before whatever unit, (engine, transmission, etc…) was installed.

 

When service was required after the vehicle was placed in service, technicians would often apply liberal amounts of sealer and quickly return the vehicle to action.  Many times, the cure time was insufficient, either because the vehicle was rushed out the door, or because too much of whatever sealer was used, thus extending the necessary cure time.

 

The repair didn’t leak or fail physically, but the chemicals released by the sealing product would be picked up by the fuel/air system or through chemicals leaching out into fluids.  This caused sensors to become fouled or clogged/contaminated with these chemicals and create sensor failures and malfunctions.

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I've even seen excess amounts of RTV on intake gaskets get into the oil and clog things like push rod tubes. Excess is never good!

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6 minutes ago, Eyesa Horg said:

I've even seen excess amounts of RTV on intake gaskets get into the oil and clog things like push rod tubes. Excess is never good!

I've noticed that when Freiberger is applying it, he uses his fingertip and a very light coat.

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Well... got 'er done.  

 

Attempted to go the "no sealant" route, but ended up coating one side of the gasket lightly to hold it in place while starting a couple of bolts - that danged think had seven of 'em!

 

BUT!

 

When I got the old pump off it was itself just fine - the earlier gasket had failed.  Hunh!  :huh:

 

Put the new one on anyway.  :)

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I know you’re job is done, but I wanted to chime in anyway. 
 

What @Blackwater 53393said above pretty much sums it up for me except I want to add one thing.

 

A few years back I swapped out an engine in my 2002 Chevy S10 ZR2 4x4. I had purchased a complete Fel-Pro gasket kit from NAPA. 
When installing the oil pan - a part that you cannot remove with the engine in place - I followed the gasket maker’s instructions. Dry surface, dry gasket with a dab of RTV in the corners.

The &$@#ing no good €¥%#*&-#%€£¥& leaked oil like crazy with the engine running! 
I had to pull the engine again to change it out. That Rass-n-frassin’ no good sonummabatchin’ corksorker designed by fargin’ iceholes got some freakin’ RTV that time! 
MAN, changing that engine out was a complete and total batch!

 

The moral of the story:

Engineers and their recommendations can go straight to hell when it comes to leak proofing something so sinisterly designed. I am RTV’ing the £#€% outta that thing!

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7 hours ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

Well... got 'er done.  

 

Attempted to go the "no sealant" route, but ended up coating one side of the gasket lightly to hold it in place while starting a couple of bolts - that danged think had seven of 'em!

 

BUT!

 

When I got the old pump off it was itself just fine - the earlier gasket had failed.  Hunh!  :huh:

 

Put the new one on anyway.  :)

 

Missed this but , Yes Gasgacinch , HighTack , or spray adhesive on one side to hold gasket in place  all I ever do , rare occasion if mating surface is pitted I will use a bit of RTV sealer . 

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