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Getting Help Shouldn't Be Looked On As Shameful


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1 hour ago, PowerRiverCowboy said:

That would be one of the Very few unfortunately .  In all my years I was with 2 CSM's that were awesome and 1  First Sgt. , so anymore thats a rare case. 


I served under some excellent First Sergeants. I mean take a bullet for ‘em excellent. A couple so-so, and only one comes to mind that was an oxygen thief. Strange thing, though, there were few E9s I had much respect for, and several that, as a medic, I wouldn’t have taken a leak on if they were on fire. 

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That story has been around a while but well worth repeating.

 

I don't have the breadth of experience like some in the Saloon, but I always wondered what happened to NCOs when they promoted from SFC to MSG or 1SG.  Our brigade was full of really good platoon sergeants and squad/team leaders, but I didn't know of a MSG or higher who I'd follow across the street.  It was weird for sure.   

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1 hour ago, Charlie Harley, #14153 said:

That story has been around a while but well worth repeating.

 

I don't have the breadth of experience like some in the Saloon, but I always wondered what happened to NCOs when they promoted from SFC to MSG or 1SG.  Our brigade was full of really good platoon sergeants and squad/team leaders, but I didn't know of a MSG or higher who I'd follow across the street.  It was weird for sure.   

 

It always seemed it was the transition from E-8 to E-9 from my point of view. Although, there were a few E-8s that fit your description as well. Maybe they realized they had reached their peak and weren't really happy with where it left them.

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3 hours ago, Charlie Harley, #14153 said:

That story has been around a while but well worth repeating.

 

I don't have the breadth of experience like some in the Saloon, but I always wondered what happened to NCOs when they promoted from SFC to MSG or 1SG.  Our brigade was full of really good platoon sergeants and squad/team leaders, but I didn't know of a MSG or higher who I'd follow across the street.  It was weird for sure.   

 

I ran across this as a teacher:  a wiz-bang teacher, who is loved by parents, fellow teachers and students alike goes the administrative route, many times for the increase in salary.  

 

once there they are horrible at the job.  All those who loved her now . . . don't

 

we foundd it was called the Peter Principle:  if you perform well in your job, you will likely be promoted to the next level of your organization's hierarchy. You will continue to rise up the ladder until you reach the point where you can no longer perform well and there you stay

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29 minutes ago, Cheyenne Ranger, 48747L said:

 

I ran across this as a teacher:  a wiz-bang teacher, who is loved by parents, fellow teachers and students alike goes the administrative route, many times for the increase in salary.  

 

once there they are horrible at the job.  All those who loved her now . . . don't

 

we foundd it was called the Peter Principle:  if you perform well in your job, you will likely be promoted to the next level of your organization's hierarchy. You will continue to rise up the ladder until you reach the point where you can no longer perform well and there you stay

 

Promoted to their level of incompetence.

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The counter to being forced into being promoted to your level of incompetence is "creative incompetence"- screw up, by design, just enough you never get that last promotion.  I did it a lot.

 

Imis

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16 hours ago, DocWard said:

 

It always seemed it was the transition from E-8 to E-9 from my point of view. Although, there were a few E-8s that fit your description as well. Maybe they realized they had reached their peak and weren't really happy with where it left them.



 Yep most E-8 riding a year or two to retire and many burned out .

E-9 ,1SG route turns Admin and full Political , The Master Sgt route in still field and troop related . The one really decent First Sergeant I had was actually at one time my Platoon Sgt at 160th he was getting  out and what turned out to be our last unit he was forced to lateral from Master to First we tore that unit up messing with each other :) Had a Capt (prior enlisted ) CO he would look at the 2 of us and glare  knowing he couldnt stop what we were going to do .

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As a police detective I was involved in an incident where my partner and I brought two toddlers out of a smoke filled burning house. The youngest child died in my pov while we

raced to meet an ambulance in a freaking blizzard. This was the week before Christmas and the toddlers were the same age as my son.

The fire chief notified the Pittsburgh Hospital CISD team. They probably saved my life and after training I became a member of the team eventually working at the scene of flight 93 as well as the line of duty deaths of several officers and many other serious incidents 

All I can say is get help even if you think that you don’t need it 

 

 

Edited by Henry T Harrison
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I guess I was lucky.  I never had nor knew of any bad senior NCOs in the Army and only one Sergeant Major in the Corps who wasn't bad, just burned out and incompetent.  He was nearing retirement and covered for him until he could get out.

 

When I was a Company Commander in the Army I was assigned a s----y company, but I was given some exemplary junior officers and NCOs.

 

My First Sergeant was and old hand who knew how to handle everyone (including a rookie First Looey CO).  I think I impressed him when o told him that I was the commanding Officer and I would give the orders and that his job was to tell me what orders I needed to give.)

 

I only lost one Staff Sergeant, my supply chief, not because of any fault of his but because his wife was an alcoholic (and at that tie so was I, but I was functional and my CO helped my cope with it) who caused all manner of grief for him and for me.....and almost everyone else.  He was a good man, but I couldn't afford to keep running interference for her

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This thread is flip flopping between counseling and senior NCOs.

I have very little experience with the former.

As to the latter my experience with the latter, it pretty much mirrors Forty Rod’s.

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