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Skeet and Trap Questions


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I recently obtained a 20 gauge Over/Under Citori. It is fitted for screw in chokes (which are missing).

I want to use it for both Trap and Skeet.

Question 1:  What chokes are recommended for Trap and for Skeet?

Question 2: Which barrel should be used first for Skeet?

Question 3: Which barrel should be used for Trap (singles)?

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My Father and I shot ATA trap for a number of years (my skeet experiences and ability are best left undiscussed).

So my repressed Skeet trauma aside  :blink:.

 

Trap is shot anywhere from 16 yards behind the trap house (clay bird launch house) up to 26 yards behind.

The bird is moving fast and away from you.

You "almost always" want a choke that keeps the shot pattern together as long as possible - If the pattern opens too quickly; even well aimed shots can fail to break birds due to "holes" in the shot column that open up large enough to have the bird missed by the shot.

 

"Most" trap shooters are running full choke or Xtra full chokes.

There are some that will practice at 16 yards with a Modified (more open choke)

to work on speeding their acquisition - forcing them to get on the bird faster before the pattern opens too much).

This method was my practice regimen for 16 yard trap.

 

And even some who (cowboy clays) attempt their runs with their cylinder bore main match shotguns - and while it can be done - that generally is a tough row to hoe (and a quick way to bring your ego back into check - I swore the next time I was getting my 1897 Black Diamond trap gun out of the safe - cause my prowess with a  20inch cylinder bore was not impressing anyone)

 

As I mentioned; the bird in trap is moving much more quickly and starts out much further away from you than a typical bird thrown in cowboy - Also we rarely see the extreme angles in cowboy that you will experience with a hard left or right throw from a house - this is why our main match guns with open chokes are fine for the occasional straight away bird in CAS - they are not the ticket in a true trap event.

 

Get someone to mentor you as Trap (and even more Skeet) can be incredibly challenging AND incredibly frustrating.

Have fun.

 

Just for reference sake - I settled on a 12ga Remington 870TC (trap competition) with a 34inch Pro Ported barrel in Trap Full Choke (what most designate as Xtra Full choke nowadays)

Edited by Creeker, SASS #43022
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For chokes, most trap shooters use full or modified --  depends on which line (16-25)you're shooting from. Most of the skeet shooters used IC or skeet chokes.

 

With an O/U shotgun common practice for pretty much all clay sports is to shoot the lower barrel if you only shoot one, or shot it first if you shoot both -- it places the recoil more in line with the stock.

Edited by Ozark Huckleberry
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@Creeker, SASS #43022 and @Ozark Huckleberry

Thank you for that info. I never knew this and it explains a lot.

I won’t deviate from this thread to explain, but thank you for the info. 

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I shoot two rounds of skeet every Sunday, weather permitting.  Skeet chokes can be anything from fully open*, cylinder, skeet, improved cylinder.  Anything tighter than that makes it more challenging.

 

Trap:  Improved Modified to Extra Full depending on which line you shoot from

 

*Open is no choke at all, either from cutting the barrel down or by design in the case of British antique shotguns

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Don't trust the choke to shoot to what is marked on the choke.

Pattern it to confirm...... 

Example, my Remmy 11-87 12ga has a improved modified choke in it, that shoots just a bit tighter than what a full choke does with a very uniform pattern.

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1 hour ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Don't trust the choke to shoot to what is marked on the choke.

Pattern it to confirm...... 

Example, my Remmy 11-87 12ga has a improved modified choke in it, that shoots just a bit tighter than what a full choke does with a very uniform pattern.


^^^this

 

You also need to pattern every load. One load may pattern as full from a given gun while a different load will pattern as modified. 
 I have an 1100 with a 28” full choke barrel that shot Peters high brass factory #2s like a rifle. Had to be careful if you wanted any meat. Used to let the Turkey get out past 25 yards before I considered pulling the trigger. 

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2 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Don't trust the choke to shoot to what is marked on the choke.

Pattern it to confirm...... 

Example, my Remmy 11-87 12ga has a improved modified choke in it, that shoots just a bit tighter than what a full choke does with a very uniform pattern.


Agreed, always pattern. I shot a 96 from 20 yards at the Grand American Handicap, managed a 194/200 another year from 16 yards at an event  at the Grand, worked my way to a Class B and 23 Yard shooter, and at my last GAH broke 88 fro 25 yards shooting penalty. All with a Browning BT99 and a Skeet choke.

 

By the way, ATA Registered trap shoots are all done with a 12 gauge.

Edited by DocWard
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I only shoot trap, no skeet.
Gun of choice is a Remington V3 with 26" trap barrel.

I fiddled with chokes a whole lot.
My game radically improved (23 out of 25) by adding a Carlson extended Full choke.

 

Edited by bgavin
for typo
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Trap guns usually have a high rib to hit rising birds, skeet and sporting clays guns usually have lower ribs. Whats good for trap may not work so well for skeet. I shoot clays with a 20ga never use a choke tighter than mod and can crush a bird at a good distance if I'm on it. 

 

 

Edited by Crooked River Pete, SASS 43485
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9 hours ago, Ozark Huckleberry said:

With an O/U shotgun common practice for pretty much all clay sports is to shoot the lower barrel if you only shoot one, or shot it first if you shoot both -- it places the recoil more in line with the stock.

When you use the upper barrel, which is higher above your shoulder, the recoil lifts the barrel making it slower to get on your next target, when you use the lower barrel the recoil pushes more straight back, less rise, easier to get on the next bird.

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We shoot a lot of double barrel trap events down under..chokes vary from shooter to shooter, 99%  use U/O shotguns with 1/ 2 to 3/4 in the bottom barrel &  3/4 to full in the top barrell..myself  I prefer 1/2 & full..I use my Bowning double 

 auto a lot which is full choke.

High stocks & high ribs are common but still a lot that prefer the standard stock / low rib.

Both my trap guns are over 60 year old [ Browning ] with standard set up.

I'm shooting this coming w'end & the program is like as follows  25 Target Double Barrel

                                                                                                                25     ''         Single      ''

                                                                                                                25  ''         DB Point Score   [ 3 for the first barrel , 2 if hit wth the 2nd barrel  ]

                                                                                                               25     pair double rise

We do shoot a lot off your handicap mark & also continental which is  a mix of high & low targets.

50 target events have become  very popular.

Sporting guns are the go to for a lot of shooters as the one gun can be used for all the disciplines as you can make the gun adjustments to suit what your shooting.

I shoot skeet occassionally & use a dedicated Winchester 101 - 26'' barrel with skeet chokes..the same gun I use for tower which is a lot of fun.

A Beretta sporter sits in my safe, a good gun but comes 3rd in my choices.

Sorry I went off topic, just a bit of info.

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I use "skeet" chokes in both barrels for skeet.  Either barrel will work, and there are several times when you'll be shooting doubles.  It's the same choke in both barrels, so it doesn't make a difference.  Plus, on the stages where you don't shoot doubles, you'll shoot two anyway, just not at the same time.  Load both barrels.  Call for the bird, shoot it, call for the next bird, and shoot it.

 

For trap I use full chokes in both barrels, but all my shooting is done from the 17 yard line (I believe...whatever the front is).  If you're getting into any type of league shooting, you will be given a handicap that can put you as far back as 27 yards.  So they make extra full and extra-extra full for those.

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My 870 only had a slug barrel and rifle sight.
My first try at trap was with this gun... didn't hit much at all.
My trap mentor gave me The Look, and stepped to his truck, where he had a 26" 870 barrel in his box of goodies.
My game improved markedly.
My best is still 23/25 with the V3 and Carlson full extended choke.

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