Jump to content

30-40 Krag load data


Hoss
 Share

Recommended Posts

Just acquired an original Win 95 in 30-40 Krag. Got my dies & brass in. Looking for cast Bullet load data. Not a lot out there.  I’d like to use Red Dot or Unique, looking for any “pet loads” using those powders. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hoss said:

Just acquired an original Win 95 in 30-40 Krag. Got my dies & brass in. Looking for cast Bullet load data. Not a lot out there.  I’d like to use Red Dot or Unique, looking for any “pet loads” using those powders. 

Hoss

What are you wanting to shoot with it? What distances and target types?

Scout

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Cowtown Scout, SASS #53540 L said:

Hoss

What are you wanting to shoot with it? What distances and target types?

Scout

Steel targets out to 200 or so. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Hoss said:

Just acquired an original Win 95 in 30-40 Krag. Got my dies & brass in. Looking for cast Bullet load data. Not a lot out there.  I’d like to use Red Dot or Unique, looking for any “pet loads” using those powders. 

I shoot a 170gr gas checked pill with 13grs of Unique.  It's a sweet shooting load for the old iron.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, Jailhouse Jim, SASS #13104 said:

I shoot a 170gr gas checked pill with 13grs of Unique.  It's a sweet shooting load for the old iron.

Thanks! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Hoss said:

Steel targets out to 200 or so. 

 

I wanted to load for using Krag Rifles and Carbines to shoot in Grand Army of the Frontier events so I first tried some 193 grn .311 lead bullets with Trail Boss and found they would not group.  Did some reading and found lots of comments about .30 cal. rifles needed gas checking for lead bullets to shoot well.  Then I found some 200 grn. .309 gas cecked bullets and they did great with trail boss.  They worked great for shooting at the far distances in GAF events hitting steel targets.  Then for a couple years I also shot the rifles in the Military Long Range competion at Winter Range at the three distances of 100, 200 and 300 meters with success.  I wanted the bullet to be close to the military weight thus the 200 grn.

 

So since you are shooting out to distance I highly suggest you get Gas Checked lead bullets and JJ and given you his pet load with bullet weight also gas checked and using you requested Unique powder.  The Krags are easy to load and have a very smooth actions but I found my Winchester 95 in rifle and carbine are more difficult to load and are not condusive to fast reloades.  Good luck with shooting your Winchester 95! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I buy my gas checked bullets from Quality Cast bullets. 

 

My Lyman 46th Edition shows a range of 8.0-12.0grs of Unique so I'm a bit over that at 13 grs.  I have also loaded it at 11.0 grs of Unique with good results.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks all! I have some 170 grn gas .310 checked bullets. I’m going to start with 11 grns unique.  Give toss a try and see how it does. 
 

I’ve also read that C.E. Lewis says “The Load” for any 30 cal us 13 grns red dot 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Cowtown Scout, SASS #53540 L said:

 

I wanted to load for using Krag Rifles and Carbines to shoot in Grand Army of the Frontier events so I first tried some 193 grn .311 lead bullets with Trail Boss and found they would not group.  Did some reading and found lots of comments about .30 cal. rifles needed gas checking for lead bullets to shoot well.  Then I found some 200 grn. .309 gas cecked bullets and they did great with trail boss.  They worked great for shooting at the far distances in GAF events hitting steel targets.  Then for a couple years I also shot the rifles in the Military Long Range competion at Winter Range at the three distances of 100, 200 and 300 meters with success.  I wanted the bullet to be close to the military weight thus the 200 grn.

 

So since you are shooting out to distance I highly suggest you get Gas Checked lead bullets and JJ and given you his pet load with bullet weight also gas checked and using you requested Unique powder.  The Krags are easy to load and have a very smooth actions but I found my Winchester 95 in rifle and carbine are more difficult to load and are not condusive to fast reloades.  Good luck with shooting your Winchester 95! 

Class plz: What are gas checked bullets?  Still a “novice” reloading. Thanks in advance. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, Nimble Fingers SASS# 25439 said:

Class plz: What are gas checked bullets?  Still a “novice” reloading. Thanks in advance. 

I copper cup put on end of cast lead Bullet. Keeps lead from melting, creating leading in barrel

 

 

C6A4C0FB-4004-4ABC-8778-E209525CA3BF.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/20/2022 at 6:44 PM, Hoss said:

I’ve also read that C.E. Lewis says “The Load” for any 30 cal us 13 grns red dot 

 

That would be C E Harris.   From reading his work in Cast Bullet Association news letters, I take it he is a SASS member.  Good info from him.  I too load for .30-40 Krag and 13 grains Red Dot IS a nice soft load, making about 1500 FPS.  Most cast bullets of  15 BNH or harder with good lube will not lead at those speeds.   I tend to like about 14 grains of 4759, but since it is a discontinued powder, you probably won't find it.

 

good luck, GJ

Edited by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Garrison Joe, SASS #60708 said:

 

That would be C E Harris.   From reading his work in Cast Bullet Association news letters, I take it he is a SASS member.  Good info from him.  I too load for .30-40 Krag and 13 grains Red Dot IS a nice soft load, making about 1500 FPS.  Most cast bullets of  BNH or harder with good lube will not lead at those speeds.   I tend to like about 14 grains of 4759, but since it is a discontinued powder, you probably won't find it.

 

good luck, GJ

I think spell check got me! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Using the Lyman 311299 gas checked bullet of 200 grains, I was getting 1329 fps from 15 grains of Unique. It's a nice mild load and doesn't lead, but I haven't played with it for accuracy,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a vintage 1895 in 30US (30-40 Krag) and worked up some nice loads. Unfortunately the documentation was lost in a hard drive crash sometime after selling the rifle.  

 

SR4759 is a real good powder for loads in the 1500 - 1600 fps range. That being said, SR4759 has been discontinued, but there are some powders that will give similar results. H4198, 5744, and RE7 are good choices. 

 

I used Lyman 311041 with a gas check and didn't have any issues. 

 

Gas checks are like hitting the Easy Button when developing a cast bullet load. They seem to cure so many ills. 

 

What a gas check does:

  • the gas check lets you use a softer alloy for the load. Lyman #2 is a bit pricey to blend up, Lino is pricey as well. 
  • the gas check grips the rifling, less skidding. 
  • the gas check will tolerate an imperfect barrel, small pits and such will fill with lead and grease and appear smooth..
  • the gas check allows the use of a wider range of diameters, IOW, it doesn't have to match the groove diameter as precisely.
  • the gas check will add a bit of expense and time to the casting/lube and size process. 
  • the primary reason to use a gas check is as it's name implies, to check the gas. The gas check limits or eliminates blow-by, so there is less or no gas cutting of the lead. It's the velocity of the escaping combustion gases that melts the lead on the surface of the bullet shank, and the molten particle spray weld onto the surface of the barrel. Gas cutting is the main cause of forcing cone leading in a revolver. It is easy to remove fortunately. Barrel leading, no so easy to remove.    

I'm not a fan of using really fast powders for cast in rifles. just how I roll I guess. I'd suggest chronographing your loads to detect ignition and/or powder position issues. 

 

1234751683_Cast_harris.jpg.03dad8b365173af42e7e6b8cd6801685.jpg

This is a chart for 30-06, but it does show the correlation between the various powders and the desired velocity. The man who made this chart knew his onions, Col. E. H. Harrison.

 

851527612_Cast_harris1.jpg.64495fa5668f8d2c8fb6fe482a1a7875.jpg

 

Wish I could share my data, sorry.

 

BB

 

Edited by "Big Boston"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, "Big Boston" said:

I had a vintage 1895 in 30US (30-40 Krag) and worked up some nice loads. Unfortunately the documentation was lost in a hard drive crash sometime after selling the rifle.  

 

SR4759 is a real good powder for loads in the 1500 - 1600 fps range. That being said, SR4759 has been discontinued, but there are some powders that will give similar results. H4198, 5744, and RE7 are good choices. 

 

I used Lyman 311041 with a gas check and didn't have any issues. 

 

Gas checks are like hitting the Easy Button when developing a cast bullet load. They seem to cure so many ills. 

 

What a gas check does:

  • the gas check lets you use a softer alloy for the load. Lyman #2 is a bit pricey to blend up, Lino is pricey as well. 
  • the gas check grips the rifling, less skidding. 
  • the gas check will tolerate an imperfect barrel, small pits and such will fill with lead and grease and appear smooth..
  • the gas check allows the use of a wider range of diameters, IOW, it doesn't have to match the groove diameter as precisely.
  • the gas check will add a bit of expense and time to the casting/lube and size process. 
  • the primary reason to use a gas check is as it's name implies, to check the gas. The gas check limits or eliminates blow-by, so there is less or no gas cutting of the lead. It's the velocity of the escaping combustion gases that melts the lead on the surface of the bullet shank, and the molten particle spray weld onto the surface of the barrel. Gas cutting is the main cause of forcing cone leading in a revolver. It is easy to remove fortunately. Barrel leading, no so easy to remove.    

I'm not a fan of using really fast powders for cast in rifles. just how I roll I guess. I'd suggest chronographing your loads to detect ignition and/or powder position issues. 

 

1234751683_Cast_harris.jpg.03dad8b365173af42e7e6b8cd6801685.jpg

This is a chart for 30-06, but it does show the correlation between the various powders and the desired velocity. The man who made this chart knew his onions, Col. E. H. Harrison.

 

851527612_Cast_harris1.jpg.64495fa5668f8d2c8fb6fe482a1a7875.jpg

 

Wish I could share my data, sorry.

 

BB

 

Thanks for the “class”. I just picked up a vintage 1895 Winchester in .30-40 and a Krag rifle ( a great cousin was in the Spanish American War) and didn’t realize .30-40 was hard to find. Appreciate the info!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried 12.0 Unique. It seemed to work well. No pressure signs. Definitely a softer recoil than the factory loads I found. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/20/2022 at 9:39 PM, Garrison Joe, SASS #60708 said:

 

That would be C E Harris.   From reading his work in Cast Bullet Association news letters, I take it he is a SASS member.  Good info from him.  I too load for .30-40 Krag and 13 grains Red Dot IS a nice soft load, making about 1500 FPS.  Most cast bullets of  15 BNH or harder with good lube will not lead at those speeds.   I tend to like about 14 grains of 4759, but since it is a discontinued powder, you probably won't find it.

 

good luck, GJ


I used to shoot with Ed back in the late 80s through mid-90s. To my knowledge he is not and never was a SASS member but he has long been a CBA member. A lot of the data for cast bullets in milsurps and for Ed's Red came from our High Power team over several years. When reading about Ed's Red where you see "tested after hours in a defense contractor's lab", that was me.

What we found, the short version-
Wheelweight alloy works best.
Soft lube like LBT Blue Soft (lubrisizer) or Lee Liquid Alox (Lee push through die) work best.
2400 or Red Dot powder work best.
Velocity 1500-1850 gives good accuracy and helps prevent leading with GC bullets.
Size the bullet to the throat not the bore.
Lee Factory Crimp at the crimp groove.
Clean with Ed's Red regularly and what leading does occur over the course of a High Power match (minimum of 68 rounds, 20 of them rapid fire) is minimal and cleans right out.
The primer is the key to accuracy, the best is a Federal Gold Medal 210M for consistent ignition with a reamed and internally chamfered flash hole.

If you want to get really anal sort cases and bullets by weight into .1gr batches. You can get MOA or better.

You will probably need to turn the outside of the neck for .311" and .312" bullets. Turn to .015" wall thickness (for most rifles this is enough to prevent pressure problems and have decent neck tension). Anneal and trim to length every 5th loading and the cases can easily go 50+ loadings. You may need to touch up the neck turning too if a donut starts to form at the neck/shoulder transition (K&M now makes a donut reamer).

In .30-06 my go to loads are 155gr Lee bullet (the one they list as for 7.62x39) over 16.0gr 2400 or 196gr Hoch Nose pour bullet over 20.0gr 2400. Sized to .312" with LBT Blue Soft lube.

When casting lightly frosted is okay. Sharp square base and sharp driving bands. Minor defects forward of the crimp groove do not have a significant effect out to 300 yards.

The data was generated by a team of 5 with Mausers, Springfields, Mosins and Krags depending on who had what over a period of 3-4 years as a High Power rifle team shooting the 200 yard reduced course. We placed in the top 25% of teams. I have put upwards of 50,000 rounds through Mausers and Springfields.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was looking for some reference material for a different project and stubbled on this tidbit. Some of the info applies to 30-40.

 

CAST BULLET LOADS FOR MILITARY RIFLES

 

Cast bullets can make shooting that surplus rifle easy and economical.

And basic data works for many different guns.

 

BY C.E. Harris

 

Cast bullet loads usually give a more useful zero at practical field ranges with military battle sights than do full power loads. Nothing is more frustrating than a military rifle that shoots a foot high at 100 yards with surplus ammo when the sight is as low as it will go! Do not use inert fillers (Dacron or kapok) to take up excess empty space in the case. This was once common practice, but it raises chamber pressure and under certain conditions contributes to chamber ringing. If a particular load will not work well without a filler, the powder is not suitable for those conditions of loading. Four load classifications from Mattern (1932) cover all uses for the cast bullet military rifle. I worked up equivalent charges to obtain the desired velocity ranges with modern powders, which provide a sound basis for loading cast bullets in any post-1898 military rifle from 7mm to 8mm:

 

1. 125 grain plain based "small game/gallery" 900-1000 f.p.s., 5 grains of Bullseye or equivalent.

 

2. 150 grain plain based "100-yard target/small game", 1050-1250 f.p.s., 7 grains of Bullseye or equivalent.

 

3. 170-180 grain gas checked "200 yard target", 1500-1600 f.p.s., 16 grains of Hercules #2400 or equivalent.

 

4. 180-200 grain gas-checked "deer/600 yard target", 1750-1850 f.p.s., 26 grains of RL-7 or equivalent.

 

None of these loads are maximum when used in full-sized rifle cases such as the 30-40 Krag, .303 British, 7.65 Argentine, 7.7 Jap, 7.62x54R Russian , or 30-06. They can be used as basic load data in most modern military rifles of 7mm or larger, with a standard weight cast bullet for the caliber, such as 140-170 grains in the 7x57, 150-180 grains in the .30 calibers, and 150-190 grains in the 8mm. For bores smaller than 7mm, consult published data.

 

The Small Game or Gallery" Load

 

The 110-115 grain bullets intended for the .30 carbine and .32-20 Winchester, such as the Lyman #3118, #311008, #311359, or #311316 are not as accurate as heavier ones like the #311291. There isn't a readily available .30 caliber cast small game bullet of the proper 125-130 grain weight. LBT makes a 130 grain flat-nosed gas-check bullet for the .32 H&R Magnum which is ideal for this purpose. I recommend it highly, particularly if you own a .32 revolver.

 

The "100 Yard Target and Small Game" Load

 

I use Mattern's plain-based "100 yard target load" to use up my minor visual defect culls for offhand and rapid-fire 100 yard practice. I substitute my usual gas-checked bullets, but without the gas-check. I started doing this in 1963 with the Lyman #311291. Today I use the Lee .312-155-2R, or the similar tumble-lubed design TL.312-160-2R. Most of my rifle shooting is done with these two basic designs.

 

Bullets I intend for plain based loads are blunted using a flat-nosed top punch in my lubricator, providing a 1/8" flat which makes them more effective on small game and clearly distinguishes them from my heavier gas-checked loads. This makes more sense to me than casting different bullets.

 

Bullet preparation is easy. I visually inspect each run of bullets and throw those with gross defects into the scrap box for remelting. Bullets with minor visual defects are tumble-lubed in Lee Liquid Alox without sizing, and are used for plain base plinkers. Bullets which are visually perfect are weighed and sorted into groups of +/- 0.5 grain for use in 200 yard matches. Gas checks are pressed onto bullet bases by hand prior to running into the lubricator-sizer. For gas-check bullets loaded without the gas- checks, for cases like the .303 British, 7.62 NATO, 7.62x54R Russian and 30-06, I use 6-7 grains of almost any fast burning powder. These include, but are not limited to Bullseye, WW231, SR-7625, Green Dot, Red Dot or 700-X. I have also had fine results with 8 to 9 grains of medium rate burning pistol or shotgun powders, such as Unique, PB, Herco, or SR-4756 in any case of .303 British or larger.

 

In the 7.62x39 case, use no more than 4 grains of the fast burning powders mentioned or 5 grains of the shotgun powders. Theses make accurate 50 yard small game loads which let you operate the action manually and save your precious cases. These plinkers are more accurate than you can hold.

 

Repeated loading of rimless cases with very mild loads results in the primer blast shoving the shoulder back, unless flash holes are enlarged with a No. 39 drill bit to 0.099" diameter. Cases which are so modified must never be used with full powered loads! Always identify cases which are so modified by filing a deep groove across the rim and labeling them clearly to prevent their inadvertent use. For this reason on I prefer to do my plain based practice shooting in rimmed cases like the 30-30, 30-40 Krag, 303 British and 7.62x54R which maintain positive headspace on the rim and are not subject to this limitation.

 

The Harris "Subsonic Target" Compromise

 

Mattern liked a velocity of around 1250 f.p.s. for his 100 yard target load because this was common with the lead bullet .32-40 target rifles of his era. I have found grouping is best with non gas- checked bullets in military rifles at lower velocities approaching match grade .22 long rifle ammunition. I use my "Subsonic Target" load at around 1050-1100 f.p.s. to replace both Mattern's "small game" and "100 yard target" loads, though I have lumped it with the latter since it really serves the same purpose. It's report is only a modest "pop" rather than a "crack".

 

If elongated bullet holes and enlarged groups indicate marginal bullet stability, increase the charge no more than a full grain from the minimum recommended, if needed to get consistent accuracy. If this doesn't work, try a bullet which is more blunt and short for its weight because it will be more easily stabilized. If this doesn't do the trick, you must change to a gas-checked bullet and a heavier load.

 

 

The Workhorse Load - Mattern's "200 yard Target"

 

My favorite load is the most accurate. Mattern's so-called "200 yard target load." I expect 10 shot groups at 200 yards, firing prone rapid with sling to average 4-5". I shoot high Sharpshooter, low Expert scores across the course with an issue 03A3 or M1917, shooting in a cloth coat, using may cast bullet loads. The power of this load approximates the 32-40, inadequate for deer by today's standards. Mattern's "200 yard target load" is easy to assemble. Because it is a mild load, soft scrap alloys usually give better accuracy than harder ones, such as linotype. Local military collector-shooters have standardized on 16 grains of #2400 as the "universal" prescription. It gives around 1500 f.p.s. with a 150-180 grain cast bullet in almost any military caliber. We use 16 grains of #2400 as our reference standard, just as high power competitors use 168 Sierra Match Kings and 4895.

 

The only common military rifle cartridge in which 16 grains of #2400 provides a maximum load, and which must not be exceeded, is in the tiny 7.63x39mm case. Most SKS rifles will function reliably with charges of #2400 as light as 14 grains with the Lee 312-155-2R at around 1500 f.p.s. I designed this bullet especially for the 7.62x39, but it works very well as a light bullet in any .30 or .303 caliber rifle.

 

Sixteen Grains of #2400 is the Universal Load

 

The same 16 grain charge of #2400 is universal for all calibers as a starting load. It is mild and accurate in any larger military case from a 30-40 Krag or .303 British up through a 30-06 or 7.9x57, with standard weight bullets of suitable diameter for the caliber. This is my recommendation for anybody trying cast bullets loads for the first time in a military rifle without prior load development. I say this because #2400 is not "position sensitive", requires no fiber fillers to ensure uniform ignition, and actually groups better when you stripper-clip load the rifle and bang them off, rather than tipping the muzzle up to position the powder charge.

 

Similar ballistics can be obtained with other powders in any case from 7.62x39 to 30-06 size. If you don't have Hercules #2400, you can freely substitute 17 grains of IMR or H4227, 18 grains of 4198, 21 grains of Reloder 7, 24 grains of IMR 3031, or 25.5 grains of 4895 for comparable results.

 

However, these other powders may give some vertical stringing in cases larger than the 7.62x39 unless the charge is positioned against the primer by tipping the muzzle up before firing. Hercules #2400 does not require this precaution. Don't ask me why. Hercules #2400 usually gives tight clusters only within a narrow range of charge weights within a grain or so, and the "universal" 16 grain load is almost always the best. Believe me, we have spent a lot of time trying to improve on this, and you can take our word for it.

 

The beauty of the "200 yard target load" at about 1500 f.p.s. is that it can be assembled from bullets cast from the cheapest, inexpensive scrap alloy, and fired all day without having to clean the bore. It always works. Leading is never a problem. Once a uniform bore condition is established, the rifle behaves like a .22 match rifle, perhaps needing a warming shot or two if it has cooled, but otherwise being remarkably consistent.

 

The only thing I do after a day's shooting with this load is to swab the bore with a couple of wet patches of GI bore cleaner or Hoppe's, and let it soak until the next match. I then follow with three dry patches prior to firing. It takes only about three foulers to get the 03A3 to settle into tight little clusters again.

 

"Deer and Long Range Target Load"

 

Mattern's "deer and 600 yard target load" can be assembled in cases of 30-40 Krag capacity or larger up to 30-06 using 18-21 grains of #2400 or 4227, 22-25 grains of 4198, 25-28 grains of RL-7 or 27-30 grains of 4895, which give from 1700-1800 f.p.s., depending on the case size. These charges must not be used in cases smaller than the 303 British without cross checking against published data! The minimum charge should always be used initially, and the charge adjusted within the specified range only as necessary to get best grouping.

 

Popular folklore suggests a barrel must be near perfect for good results with cast bullets, but this is mostly bunk, though you may have to be persistent.

 

I have a rusty-bored Finnish M28/30 which I have shot extensively, in making direct comparisons with the same batches of loads on the same day with a mint M28 and there was no difference. The secret in getting a worn bore to shoot acceptably is to remove all prior fouling and corrosion. Then you must continue to clean the bore "thoroughly and often" until it maintains a consistent bore condition over the long term. You must also keep cast bullet loads under 1800 f.p.s. for hunting and under 1600 f.p.s. for target work.

 

A cleaned and restored bore will usually give good accuracy with cast bullet loads if the bullet fits the chamber throat properly, is well lubricated and the velocities are kept below 1800 f.p.s.

 

The distinction between throat diameter and groove diameter in determining proper bullet size is important. If you are unable to determine throat diameter from a chamber cast, a rule of thumb is to size bullets .002" over groove diameter, such as .310" for a 30-06, .312" for a 7.63x54R and .314" for a .303 British.

 

"Oversized 30's", like the .303 British, 7.7 Jap, 7.65 Argentine, and 7.62x39 Russian frequently give poor accuracy with .30 caliber cast bullets designed for U.S. barrels having .300 bore and .308 groove dimensions. This is because the part of the bullet ahead of the driving bands receives no guidance from the lands in barrel s of larger bore diameter. The quick rule of thumb to checking proper fit of the forepart is to insert the bullet, nose first, into the muzzle. If it enters clear up to the front driving band without being noticeably engraved, accuracy will seldom be satisfactory.

 

The forepart is not too large if loaded rounds can be chambered with only slight resistance, the bullet does not telescope back into the case, or stick in the throat when extracted without firing. A properly fitting cast bullet should engrave the forepart positively with the lands, and be no more than .001" under chamber throat diameter on the driving bands. Cast bullets with a tapered forepart at least .002" over bore diameter give the best results.

 

Many pre-WWII Russian rifles of US make, and later Finnish reworks, particularly those with Swiss barrels by the firm SIG, have very snug chamber necks and cannot be used with bullets over .311" diameter unless case necks are reamed or outside turned to .011" wall thickness to provide safe clearance.

 

Bullets with a large forepart, like the Lee 312-155-2R or Lyman #314299 work best with the 7.62x54R because the forcing cones are large and gradual. Standard .30 caliber gas-checks are correct.

 

Finnish 7.62x54R, Russian 7.62x39 and 7.65 Argentine barrels are smaller than Russian 7.62x54R, Chinese 7.62x39, Jap 7.7 or .303 British barrels, and usually have standard .300" bore diameter. (Finnish barrels occasionally are as small as .298") and groove diameters of .310 -.3115".

 

In getting the best grouping with iron sighted military rifles, eyesight is the limiting factor. Anybody over age 40 who shoots iron sights should equip himself with a "Farr-Sight" from Gil Hebard or Brownell's. This adjustable aperture for your eyeglass frame was intended for indoor pistol shooters, but it helps my iron sight rifle shooting, and adds about 5 points to my score!

 

So now you have enough fundamentals to get started. If you want to have fun, give that old military rifle a try. You'll never know the fun you've been missing until you try it!

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.