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Shoulder Replacement Surgery


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Will be having shoulder replacement surgery.  In your experience, how long before you were able to shoot in a match once again?

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This is a link to an article re recovery from the procedure.  https://www.reboundwear.com/blogs/injuries/how-long-is-recovery-from-shoulder-replacement-surgery

 

How long is the recovery from shoulder replacement surgery?

The recovery from shoulder replacement surgery varies. The shoulder joint is a complicated structure, so many things can affect the recovery process. It will vary with your age, weight, medical history, and activity level before shoulder replacement surgery, along with your surgeon’s preference for surgical approach or patients’ comfort levels post-surgery.

After you are discharged from the hospital, your arm will have to be in a sling for 2-4 weeks until it has healed enough not to need support any longer (about 1 month). During this period, there may only be limited movement. Make sure to not lift anything over one pound. Also, try to avoid strenuous activities that may cause complications such as reopening wound decay and infection. As you know, this can potentially extend your recovery time. If you are impatient to sit around all day doing nothing, then try to engage in mild shoulder exercises with the help of a physical therapist or occupational therapist. That will ensure that your shoulder muscles stay strong to expedite your recovery process.

Most people have good shoulder function after shoulder replacement surgery in about three months to one year. That depends on how quickly they recover from the pain and swelling around the new artificial shoulder implant. Full range of motion usually returns within six months. Still, it could take up to two years to regain full strength of shoulder muscles surrounding the shoulder joint without any prior physical therapy treatments.

When it comes to recovery after surgery, time is on your side, and every day counts towards improving function in shoulder replacement surgery!

What to expect after shoulder replacement surgery?

Shoulder replacement surgery is a major operation, but it does not have to be painful. The day after your procedure, you will likely experience pain at your incision site. Your doctor/nurse will give you oral medication, which will help alleviate discomfort at this time. However, if anything else happens other than what was originally planned, don’t hesitate to ask about switching over to post-op care where they provide more rigorous therapy programs tailored specifically towards shoulder rehabilitation goals.

Your doctor will recommend you to take a rest for about six weeks after undergoing shoulder replacement surgery. Avoid activities such as lifting heavy objects in this time duration because your arm needs some time to heal properly. If necessary, pain medication will help you lessen the discomfort experienced due to inflammation and swelling in the area around your joints. Your doctor may also prescribe certain antibiotics if there are signs of infection near or at your incision site—this usually occurs.

It is not unusual that people who undergo this type of surgery will have to take some time off work. How long you are away from work will depend on many factors, including the type of job you do and your age, overall health, and fitness level before having shoulder replacement surgery. The average length of absence varies between 12 weeks to six months or longer in cases where a person's occupation requires heavy lifting or strenuous activity, such as construction workers or athletes requiring shoulder strength for competition

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I had both shoulders rebuilt in open reconstructive surgery procedures, ten years apart.  If that article is accurate, what I went through twice was a lot worse than replacement surgery.  "The day after your procedure, you will likely experience pain at your incision site."  No kidding, really?  Six months for full range of motion?  Possibly, just -- one took longer than the other.  At six months I could toss a tennis ball underhand to the rehab therapist.  But definitely after a year for each I could say I was definitely stronger than before and had full range of motion and better overall fitness too.  The surgeries did fix the torn labrum, torn cartilage, torn tendons, etc., so at least those pains went away.  My doc said "I'm going to fix the injuries that won't heal by giving you new injuries that will; do your rehab like you mean it and it will all work out."  He was right.

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Best place for this information is the Dr who is doing the surgery.

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I don't know about replacement but I've had both rotator cuffs done. 2 completly different tears 2 different surgeries. One was a piece of cake I was 100% after about a month. The other was torture the first few weeks and full recovery was 25-30 weeks. Funny thing was is the easy one IMO the damage looked way worse.  

 

Good luck and listen to your doctor. Don't rush the healing. 

 

JEL

 

Also,  the second surgery was torture caused I'm afraid of getting the nerve block. It just doesn't sit right with me and I'd rather suffer for a little while than face the risks. Most people, including my wife, think I'm an idiot,  which is probably more truth than fiction, but I have a high pain tolerance and after the first one I figured I'd battle the second. If I had to do it again? After seeing my buddy breeze through a similar procedure,I'd really reconsider getting the block. 

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Right shoulder, reverse joint replacement, 4 years ago. Very good movement. The geometry is different with the rotation. I can't reach behind my back for belt or tuck my shirt in.

DO not skip on therapy. DO not over do recovery. Therapy hurts. But ice and Tylenol work. 

The new joint moves everything towards your ear. So your rifle will not go into the arm/shoulder crotch. You adapt.

I had to have a ligament re-attached. I still can't lift a 1/2 gallon of milk without using my left hand. Doc said it is what it is.

I shoot dualist, so I can't lift my revolver without help. As in tucking my left hand into my arm pit to help hold my arm up.

6 months to get to that point. I had rotator cuff surgery. Replacement is way harder to recover.

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I agree with the Pard above that stated that the best source of this information would be your doctor!  However, I had a full replacement in my right shoulder and was told that I could shoot again after 9 months.  It is now almost 4 years later and although I can and do shoot with a long gun to the right shoulder, heavy recoil is still a problem for me and leaves me with a very sore shoulder for quite a while afterward.  Never used to bother me a bit shooting the shotgun or my 45/70's, even with heavy loads, but now I'm hesitant to do so even with light loads and am even considering selling my 45/70's and some of my shotguns.  I guess I'll never again go to the range and shoot a 100 rounds or more of shotgun and I'm sure not loading up any hunting loads for my 45/70's!  

 

Anyway, my point here is that getting a shoulder replacement does not give one a "New Shoulder" and the end results can vary quite a bit from person to person no matter what they tell you.  I'm not sorry I got my shoulder replacement, because I was in terrible pain prior to the surgery and couldn't shoot or do much of anything with my right arm.  After the replacement and recovery the pain level is indeed much improved and I am able to do most things, although I too have trouble reaching around my back as someone mentioned above.  Therefore, I'd recommend getting the surgery if it is really needed and that is a choice that you should consider carefully, as there are other risks involved as well!  However, I would also hope that you can have realistic expectations when it comes to the final results and be happy with the outcome however it turns out.  Good luck and good shooting to all.  

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On 8/2/2022 at 3:19 PM, Rover SASS 28073L said:

Will be having shoulder replacement surgery.  In your experience, how long before you were able to shoot in a match once again?

 

Wow, I had no idea you were having problems. Prayers for a speedy recovery and a quick return to shooting.
What caused it? All those years of Dog Bite hanging on your shirt tails? :D

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Took me over 9 months, but everyone is different.  PT is difficult but you have to do it.  On the upside you learn to be ambidextrous 

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On 8/2/2022 at 3:19 PM, Rover SASS 28073L said:

Will be having shoulder replacement surgery.  In your experience, how long before you were able to shoot in a match once again?

Which shoulder are you having done?

 

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