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I have this old Smith & Wesson revolver


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I have this old Smith & Wesson revolver which I picked up in trade. however, I can't figure out the model and therefore the value. I've been told it may be a airman issued gun as it's marked US property. if anybody can help me with the model and approximate value I would appreciate it thanks

Windy City Red

raceshots8@gmail.com

 

update - gun seems in pretty good condition considering it's age.

serial number on cylinder matches number on the frame.IMG_20220622_113710023_MP.thumb.jpg.a095332e558776f13481f9fdb8712851.jpg

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Edited by SouthwestShooter
added info n pic
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PM Sent.

From a revolver that looks similar:  "History: This is a Smith & Wesson Victory Model from World War II. It is U.S. Property marked and G.H.D (Guy H. Drewry) inspector marked from Springfield Armory. These were made from 1942 to 1944. There were a little over a half million made. They were standard issued side arms for US Navy and Marine air crews due to their size and ease of operation. It is .38 S&W rather than the .38 special that the U.S. military used."

 

Will need serial number to determine age & model. Also need caliber as marked.

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18 minutes ago, Boulder Canyon Bob# 32052L said:

I’ll have to take it and bring it home for inspection, it may take a while. 

Hmmm...I was thinking the same thing. :lol:

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46 minutes ago, Mudflat Mike, SASS #20904 said:

 "Victory" model.  Usually issued to USN air crew's in WWII.  Saw several in RVN, still in use.  Usually parkerized.

I thought all Victory models had a lanyard loop on the butt...? The dead giveaway is if the s/n starts with a V.

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You have a S&W Victory model & it should be a .38 special. Ones that were issued to the US military during WW II had 4" barrels & usually went to the Navy and the Marine Corps for issue to pilots. Other Victory models went to police departments and for use by security officers that worked for defense industries. The lanyard loop has been removed. I can't tell by the pictures if the hole is empty or plugged.

 

Other Victory models, known as British Service Revolvers (BSRs) went to the British to be issued to Commonwealth troops. These were chambered in .38 S&W and most of them had 5" barrels, although 4" and 6" barrels are occasionally encountered.

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dear boulder, I dropped it in the mail box,. hope it finds it's way to you.  

after added pic, anyone have a guess on value so I can post it here.. Thanks again.

Windy City Red 

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I probably should have included your address. oh well

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Does the serial on the barrel agree with the serial on the cylinder and the butt?

 

I wondered why my barrel said that the gun was chambered for 38 special and US service cartridge. The number on the barrel did not match the other numbers on the gun. It had been rebarreled at some time.

 

This did not change the efficiency of the gun, but it definitely lowered the sale value.

 

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Lol , besides my wife, I have enough keepers.  This one's gonna go on the market here as soon as I can figure out the value.  Oh, you know I'm talking about the gun, not my wife right?

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1 hour ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

I thought all Victory models had lanyard rings. That one doesn’t appear to have a hole for the lanyard ring in the butt. 

There looks to be a hole right before the number on the butt.

 

Never mind :D as I read further, noticed the pix were added later!

Edited by Eyesa Horg
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Yup, the hole in the butt is where the lanyard loop went. Not all Victory Models had the V prefix. It should be in 38 Special as it has the 4" barrel, where the ones that went to Britain had 5" barrels and were in .38-200 [as the Brits called it] the 38S&W cartridge. It would have come with either checkered [early] or smooth walnut grips.

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What is the caliber marking on the right side of the barrel?  I can't tell from the pictures.  While most U.S.-issued Victorys were in .38 S&W Special, the internet suggests there were a few in .38 S&W (e.g. this article, although I've also seen it mentioned elsewhere: https://www.americanrifleman.org/content/v-is-for-victory-the-smith-wesson-victory-model-revolver/ ).

 

And it seems there were also U.S. marked Victory revolvers sent overseas as part of lend-lease (normally in .38 S&W), but I'm not versed enough to comment on whether this could be one.

 

I'm guessing yours is in .38 Spl, but if it is marked .38 S&W, you should check whether the chambers were reamed post-war for the longer but narrower .38 Spl, which most shooters would probably consider detrimental.

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2 hours ago, SouthwestShooter said:

Lol , besides my wife, I have enough keepers.  This one's gonna go on the market here as soon as I can figure out the value.  Oh, you know I'm talking about the gun, not my wife right?

 

1 hour ago, Hair Trigger Jim said:

What is the caliber marking on the right side of the barrel?  I can't tell from the pictures.  While most U.S.-issued Victorys were in .38 S&W Special, the internet suggests there were a few in .38 S&W (e.g. this article, although I've also seen it mentioned elsewhere: https://www.americanrifleman.org/content/v-is-for-victory-the-smith-wesson-victory-model-revolver/ ).

 

And it seems there were also U.S. marked Victory revolvers sent overseas as part of lend-lease (normally in .38 S&W), but I'm not versed enough to comment on whether this could be one.

 

I'm guessing yours is in .38 Spl, but if it is marked .38 S&W, you should check whether the chambers were reamed post-war for the longer but narrower .38 Spl, which most shooters would probably consider detrimental.

 

1 hour ago, DeaconKC said:

Yup, the hole in the butt is where the lanyard loop went. Not all Victory Models had the V prefix. It should be in 38 Special as it has the 4" barrel, where the ones that went to Britain had 5" barrels and were in .38-200 [as the Brits called it] the 38S&W cartridge. It would have come with either checkered [early] or smooth walnut grips.

Mine is marked and chambered in .38 S&W, 5" barrel, V prefix, lanyard ring, and I paid under $300 off Gunbroker in 2016.

DeaconKC, without the V prefix, what else defines these as Victory models?

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3 hours ago, Three Foot Johnson said:

 

 

Mine is marked and chambered in .38 S&W, 5" barrel, V prefix, lanyard ring, and I paid under $300 off Gunbroker in 2016.

DeaconKC, without the V prefix, what else defines these as Victory models?

The term Victory came from the V for Victory hand sign Churchill used. Someone at S&W came up with the moniker and it stuck. So when they reached the end of a SN run [I forget which one] they started using a V in the SN. Roy Jink's book has a whole chapter on these smooth shooters. Even in the biggest rush ones, the actions were S&W smooth, even with rougher [Parkerized] exterior finishes. Does yours have the British acceptance and proof marks?

Edited by DeaconKC
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Just now, Three Foot Johnson said:

 

Victory_01.jpg

Victory_02.jpg

Victory_03.jpg

Victory_04.jpg

Victory_05.jpg

Sweet! Unlike most S&Ws that will be regulated for a 200 grain jacketed bullet at about 650 FPS.

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3.0 grains of Unique and a 200 grain LRN does the trick. ;)

38-200.jpg

Edited by Three Foot Johnson
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7 hours ago, Eyesa Horg said:

There looks to be a hole right before the number on the butt.

 

Never mind :D as I read further, noticed the pix were added later!

Yep, that photo wasn’t there earlier. The side shots that somewhat showed the butt made it appear as if there were no hole. 
 

That is a sweet looking revolver. Personally, I would let the grip panels go to someone that might like them. 
 

You know what’s damned annoying to me…When I typed that last sentence I went looking for some replica grip panels that would dress this beauty right up. I searched “replica grips for S&W Victory”. What did I get back? A bunch of garbage about that “new” 22 Victory. That thing doesn’t deserve the moniker. It’s a rehash of their 22A. 
 

Anyway, some nice walnut would really look good on that old beauty. 

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12 hours ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

You know what’s damned annoying to me…When I typed that last sentence I went looking for some replica grip panels that would dress this beauty right up. I searched “replica grips for S&W Victory”. What did I get back? A bunch of garbage about that “new” 22 Victory. That thing doesn’t deserve the moniker. It’s a rehash of their 22A. 
 

Anyway, some nice walnut would really look good on that old beauty. 

Search "vintage grips S&W Victory” and you should get some results. I found several on ebay.

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13 hours ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

What did I get back? A bunch of garbage about that “new” 22 Victory. That thing doesn’t deserve the moniker.

Smith is the worst, but not the only.

 

A CHIEF'S SPECIAL is not a plastic bottom-feeder. It is a J-frame 38 Special.

 

An M&P is also not a plastic bottom-feeder, mor is it an AR15 wannabe. It is a K-frame 38 Special.

 

And a VICTORY is not a 22 LR bottom-feeder, but is a specific version of a 38 M&P.

 

A Ruger HAWKEYE is not a lightweight bolt action rifle. It is a single-shot pistol that greatly resembles a Super Blackhawk, chambered in 256 Winchester.

 

And a Colt OFFICER'S MODEL is not a cut-down 1911, but is a large-frame 38 Special holster revolver.

 

These companies need to hire advertising companies that can come up with NEW names for their products, and quit reusing old ones.

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1 hour ago, Alpo said:

Smith is the worst, but not the only.

 

A CHIEF'S SPECIAL is not a plastic bottom-feeder. It is a J-frame 38 Special.

 

An M&P is also not a plastic bottom-feeder, mor is it an AR15 wannabe. It is a K-frame 38 Special.

 

And a VICTORY is not a 22 LR bottom-feeder, but is a specific version of a 38 M&P.

 

A Ruger HAWKEYE is not a lightweight bolt action rifle. It is a single-shot pistol that greatly resembles a Super Blackhawk, chambered in 256 Winchester.

 

And a Colt OFFICER'S MODEL is not a cut-down 1911, but is a large-frame 38 Special holster revolver.

 

These companies need to hire advertising companies that can come up with NEW names for their products, and quit reusing old ones.

I agree 100%

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