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Transporting Firearms across State Lines to Events


Sam Colt
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Over the last 39 years I have traveled and shot in 25 states and traveled through 3 other states I did not stop to shoot. Never had any problems. Only flew twice all other times drove with firearms, ammo and equipment in vehicle out of sight. Don't do anything to attract attention or be stopped by law enforcement.

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On 5/25/2022 at 3:01 PM, Eyesa Horg said:

Amazing the rules and paranoia to exercise our Constitutional right.

ive got to agree with you here , it should not be any more difficult anywhere , 

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On 5/25/2022 at 6:01 PM, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

 

 (You can even cross state lines with a C&R Machine Gun without the ATF's permission.)   It's just an added level of protection of you have a Federal Permit to do so.  Anything over 50 years old is automatically C&R.   

Anything made before the 1898 cut off date, even cartridge guns, is an antique and not subject to FEDERAL Firearms laws.   State laws may vary.   That's why I think C&R's might actually be "safer" with the specific permit.
 

As one that owns Class 3 weapons and silencers. You may want to read the Rules and regulations on owning a Class 3 and how to acquire one and rules for crossing State Borders with a Class 3 Firearm.

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1 hour ago, Marshal Dan Troop 70448 said:

As one that owns Class 3 weapons and silencers. You may want to read the Rules and regulations on owning a Class 3 and how to acquire one and rules for crossing State Borders with a Class 3 Firearm.

 

I have read the rules.   When I was researching them, I was surprised to learn that if the machine gun in question is also C&R eligible, and if you have a C&R FFL, you can cross state lines without getting prior permission.  (I even asked at ATF Agent about this to make sure I understood correctly.  He said I did.)   OBTAINING such a gun in the first place is no different.  

And of course, you need to be aware of any additional state laws that may apply to your specific location.

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

 

I have read the rules.   When I was researching them, I was surprised to learn that if the machine gun in question is also C&R eligible, and if you have a C&R FFL, you can cross state lines without getting prior permission.  (I even asked at ATF Agent about this to make sure I understood correctly.  He said I did.)   OBTAINING such a gun in the first place is no different.  

And of course, you need to be aware of any additional state laws that may apply to your specific location.

Fully automatic firearms are not C&R eligible even if 50+ years old. They still need to be transferred through a Class 3 Licensed holder and appropriate application with a 200.00 payment and review by ATF.. Holding a C&R License will not be an automatic in buying or collecting one. If you plan on crossing state lines were they are recognized, you have to fill out a notice, can be done on-line. Also anytime weapon leaves home, appropriate paper work with stamp must be carried along or a copy. 

Best to contact a Class 3 Dealer who will give you all the rules and laws to meet and follow. As to ATF agents, several Gunshops have been told wrong info by an agent that wasn't clear about rules and laws.  With any Class 3 items, better to be cautious then face heavy fines, jail time, and confiscations of same or all.

I'm done on this.

Edited by Marshal Dan Troop 70448
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1 minute ago, Marshal Dan Troop 70448 said:

Fully automatic firearms are not C&R eligible even if 50+ years old. They still need to be transferred through a Class 3 Licensed holder and appropriate application with a 200.00 payment and review by ATF.. Holding a C&R License will not be an automatic in buying or collecting one. If you plan on crossing state lines were they are recognized, you have to fill out a notice, can be done on-line. Also anytime weapon leaves home, appropriate paper work with stamp must be carried along or a copy. 

 

Yes, they are.   To quote the C&R Book list...


Section IV — NFA firearms classified as curios or relics, still subject to the provisions of 26 U.S.C. Chapter 53, the National Firearms Act, and 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44, the Gun Control Act of 1968.

 

Rather than list several pages of guns that are then listed, here's just a specific example...

Auto Ordnance, Korean War Commemorative, Thompson Model 1928, cal. .45.

Auto Ordnance, Thompson Model 1928, cal. .22, machinegun in original configuration as manufactured at the West Hurley, NY, facility between 1980 and 1981.

Auto Ordnance, WWII Commemorative, Thompson Model 1928, cal. .45.

Auto Ordnance Corporation, Model 1928 Thompson sub-machineguns, all cal.’s (including .45 and .22), manufactured in the 1970s and 1980s in West Hurley, New York.
Thompson, Model 1927, semiautomatic carbine, cal. .45 ACP.
Thompson, Model 1928, Korean War Commemorative submachineguns, cal. .45, produced by
Auto Ordnance, West Hurley, NY.
Thompson, Model 1928, Navy, 1921 overstamp, cal. .45ACP, submachinegun, mfd. by Colt.
Thompson, submachinegun, Model M1, cal. .45, mfd. by Auto Ordnance Corporation, West
Hurley, New York, between 1985 and 1986, having S/Ns from M100A to M717A. 

 

In other words, Tommyguns are C&R.

*Purchasing* one still requires you to go though ALL the NFA 34 procedures.   Those can not be avoided.  But once you actually OWN the gun, you do have some limited lessening of the regs.   Which is all I ever said.  I never said a C&R was a shortcut to getting such a gun in the first place.

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On 5/26/2022 at 8:26 AM, Bison Bud said:

.. I'm pretty sure you are required in virtually all states to inform the officer if you get stopped.  ...

States that require Driver to inform the Officer:

 

Alaska

Arizona - if asked

Arkansa - if asked

Connecticut - if asked

Delaware - if asked

Florida - if asked

Illinois - if asked

Iowa - if asked

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland - if asked

Massachusetts - if asked

Michigan

Minnesota - if asked

Missouri - if asked

Nebraska

Nevada - if asked

New York - if asked

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma - if asked

South Carolina

Texas - if asked

Virginia

Washington - if asked

Wisconsin - if asked

 

 

Above information from "Legal Heat" smart phone APP

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Matthew Duncan said:

States that require Driver to inform the Officer:

 

Alaska

Arizona - if asked

Arkansa - if asked

Connecticut - if asked

Delaware - if asked

Florida - if asked

Illinois - if asked

Iowa - if asked

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland - if asked

Massachusetts - if asked

Michigan

Minnesota - if asked

Missouri - if asked

Nebraska

Nevada - if asked

New York - if asked

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma - if asked

South Carolina

Texas - if asked

Virginia

Washington - if asked

Wisconsin - if asked

 

 

Above information from "Legal Heat" smart phone APP

 

So, it's not required in states like Alaska, Michigan or Virginia?

Edited by H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619
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not required here in Montana either.

 

Bugler

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7 hours ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

 

So, it's not required in states like Alaska, Michigan or Virginia?

 

For Virginia residents, if a LEO runs the plates/driver, it will come back with a flag if the person has a VA carry permit.

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8 hours ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

 

So, it's not required in states like Alaska, Michigan or Virginia?

It’s is required to inform the police without being asked to do so.

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21 hours ago, Matthew Duncan said:

States that require Driver to inform the Officer:

 

Alaska

Arizona - if asked

Arkansa - if asked

Connecticut - if asked

Delaware - if asked

Florida - if asked

Illinois - if asked

Iowa - if asked

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland - if asked

Massachusetts - if asked

Michigan

Minnesota - if asked

Missouri - if asked

Nebraska

Nevada - if asked

New York - if asked

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma - if asked

South Carolina

Texas - if asked

Virginia

Washington - if asked

Wisconsin - if asked

 

 

Above information from "Legal Heat" smart phone APP

 

Thanks Matthew, I stand corrected and probably should have originally stated that it varies from state to state.  However, Kentucky probably needs to be added to the list.  It was a long time ago (maybe 20 years) when I took the required course and testing for a concealed carry permit here in Kentucky and it might have changed since then, but at that time it was clearly mandatory to inform the officer if stopped while carrying a loaded gun or any other concealed weapon.  I've only been stopped twice since then and both times I put my shooter on the passenger seat and stuck my hands out the side window until the Policeman got along side, then I informed him that I was carrying and that I had put my shooter on the seat in plain view.  Both times I was asked to get out of the car while we talked and only gave them the driver's licence out of my wallet, as they did not want me to go into the glove box for my registration with the gun on the seat or have to handle the weapon.  Also both times I was let go with a warning and no ticket.  

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