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Just wondering about SAA Values


McCandless
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Posted (edited)

I just in the thinking stage right now.  Nothing definite, but eventually...

What might be the resale value for a pair of 2nd Gen Colt Single Action Armies?   They are fully hand-engraved, (not by Colt) nickel-plated

5-1/2" .357, with real ivory grips.

They have lighted springs, but to my knowledge everything else is stock Colt.

 

I've checked all the usual auction sights, and I can't find anything near a match.

 

Last appraisal I got from a Colt collector was in the 8K range for the pair.  But, what would be real world?

(Yeah I know, whatever someone is willing to pay).  But, if you had to set a price?

 

I'm not much of photographer... this is the best I can do:

 

DSC_0377.thumb.JPG.c69195d20fb5bf19276bf3cc5d0dc4c3.JPG

 

577450108_DSC_0379detail.thumb.JPG.e9f83fe955a4045f3ba2547f588be2b9.JPG

Edited by McCandless
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Second Generation makes them valuable.

Engraving makes them more valuable.

 

Ivory grips also enhance the value.   Did they come from the factory or are they after market?


Not *Factory* engraving may give you less of  premium, but I think it still enhances the price.

Personally, I'd say $5000 each.   If the engraving were factory, I'd be more likely to say the eight grand was legitimate.

PERSONALLY the caliber makes them less interesting to me, as does the barrel length, but now we are getting into preferences.   I have no idea how those factors affect the price, if at all.

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5 minutes ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

Personally, I'd say $5000 each.

 

WoW!  I was thinking 8K for the pair.  (I made an edit to be more clear.  Thanks!)

 

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Is the ivory elephant ivory?  Makes a difference in value.  Engraving looks very nice.  Engraver even did the hammers, which you normally do not see on Colt SAA revolvers.   How far apart are serial numbers?  Some folks put a premium on consecutive or near consecutive serial numbers.  In my gun store if grips are elephant ivory I most likely could get an Arizona resident to cough up  $10,000 for the pair.  

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Posted (edited)

Keep in mind that as 2nd Generation Colts, they are automatically C&R eligible.   Since the engraving is not factory, and the grips are aftermarket, that may be moving you into a gray area as they not in "original" configuration.   But at a gunshow once, I asked some ATF guys about things like this.   They basically said that if the gun is over 50 years old, they really don't care anymore if it's been modified all that much.   They said that sporterizing an old Mauser, changing the caliber and so on would take it out of C&R, but that doing things to "return" a gun to how it was originally was okay, and could even restore C&R status.   They also said that doing something like engraving was not so much a modification as an embellishment, and since it was something done to enhance collector value, they didn't really care about that either. 

Then when I pressed specifically about guns that are less than 50 but still on the list, like a 2nd Gen SAA, they basically said, "Same answer."

That was what the ATF guys at the show said.   If you are at all concerned about if these guns are still C&R or not, look into getting something *in writing* from the ATF to confirm.   Getting a Colt letter to document that it is 2nd Gen, even if the other stuff is not factory original, would not hurt either.   When you ask, just be sure to say that the engraving is not factory, and if possible document who did it.   Same for the grips.   If you've got the originals, it will not hurt to put them on the gun (or get some grips of the same type that they came from the factory with) and sell the ivory ones as extra parts that come with the pistols.

Edited by H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619
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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, john brown said:

 If the guns were engraved aftermarket and then re plated value of 15%-40% loss takes place and no collector value to a Colt collector.

 

I will not dispute that.   However, I think there are two kinds of collectors.   There is the "Colt Collector," who will indeed turn up his nose at these guns and say they have "no collector value" because the engraving was not done at the factory.  These folks *tend* to buy guns as an investment, not as shooters.

On the other had, there is the "collector of Colt firearms that he really likes," that may find these guns to be very interesting.   This is the person who will look at these guns and say that they are really nice, just happen to be "real Colts" and think that they are worth the asking price.  These folks are much more likely to be shooters, and be willing to buy almost anything, and pay a premium for a "nicer" gun, even if it has "no collector value."

I put myself in the second category.   If these guns were .45's or .44's and had 4-3/4" barrels, I'd very seriously consider them.   They may never command the price the factory gun would, but they are nice guns and would make for fun shooters.  

 

So yeah, there are two types of collectors.  Those who insist on authenticity, and those who just want a nice pistol.  And that can be everything from an ugly as sin shooter, to the guns this thread is about.   Prices will reflect the condition of the gun.  And there probably is some overlap in these two camps.

Edited by H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619
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10 hours ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

 

I will not dispute that.   However, I think there are two kinds of collectors.   There is the "Colt Collector," who will indeed turn up his nose at these guns and say they have "no collector value" because the engraving was not done at the factory.  These folks *tend* to buy guns as an investment, not as shooters.

On the other had, there is the "collector of Colt firearms that he really likes," that may find these guns to be very interesting.   This is the person who will look at these guns and say that they are really nice, just happen to be "real Colts" and think that they are worth the asking price.  These folks are much more likely to be shooters, and be willing to buy almost anything, and pay a premium for a "nicer" gun, even if it has "no collector value."

I put myself in the second category.   If these guns were .45's or .44's and had 4-3/4" barrels, I'd very seriously consider them.   They may never command the price the factory gun would, but they are nice guns and would make for fun shooters.  

 

So yeah, there are two types of collectors.  Those who insist on authenticity, and those who just want a nice pistol.  And that can be everything from an ugly as sin shooter, to the guns this thread is about.   Prices will reflect the condition of the gun.  And there probably is some overlap in these two camps.

 I agree with you I have some collector  grade and some shooters. After collecting Colts and Winchesters for over 30 years I consider them all special.

The market will determine the value.

 

Best Wishes and I hope you are feeling better.

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Take the question and pictures over to the Colt SAA forum. You will get excellent information as they are experts. Nice folks too. I am a forum member. Definitely will help to find out the engraver. I've seen a ton of engraved Colts over there and none lose any value due to engraving unless amateur. As long as the ivory is on the gun you can sell cross states no problem. 

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