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Christmas decorations.


Singin' Sue 71615

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Well...

I have kept all the Christmas decorations in a computer box for the past 20 years along with 3 popcorn tins.

I always kept them in the bedroom closet...untill last year, when they were moved outside in the garage loft.

While bringing them down, the handle broke and the box left Shanley's grip and rolled down the SIL's head/shoulder to to ground.:(

SIL is okay...but I did loose a couple of things I looked forward to putting out at Christmas time.

I have to count my blessings the couple of things from my mother and my childhood are intact.

sigh...

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We have our tree up. We just haven’t put the ornaments on it yet. 
 

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Over the years we have lost a lot of our old ornaments and decorations. We decided to start a new trend for our trees. A few years ago I bought a couple of antique Santa ornaments. I thought they were cool so I have have been buying glass Santa ornaments so eventually our whole tree will have nothing but Santa ornaments on it. 

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Brodie was asking where a certain tall, maybe wooden 'wizzard looking' Santa went.

I ABSOLUTELY do not remember what she is talking about!!! I swear I never had one.

Shanley remembers it...

I think Brodie is remembering something from Grandma Shanley's house.

Funny, huh?

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14 minutes ago, Dawg Hair, SASS #29557 said:

Only thing I'm putting up for Christmas in a big blowup Grinch in the front yard.............if I can find one.

Walmart sells a Grinch sleeper....and I hear places sell blow up dolls....so there ya go!!!

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We haven't done a tree in several years after the cats destroyed many old ornaments. But previous to that we used to get 20 foot trees and all the ornaments were elephants or harley ornaments. Looked pretty cool! A real treat to get a 20' tree in the house. Finally put a hook in the ceiling and used a block and tackle to lift it and then a Sawzall to cut it up to remove after the holidays. Too old for all that labor now.:lol:

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51 minutes ago, Eyesa Horg said:

We haven't done a tree in several years after the cats destroyed many old ornaments. But previous to that we used to get 20 foot trees and all the ornaments were elephants or harley ornaments. Looked pretty cool! A real treat to get a 20' tree in the house. Finally put a hook in the ceiling and used a block and tackle to lift it and then a Sawzall to cut it up to remove after the holidays. Too old for all that labor now.:lol:

Ahhhhhh...many folks in Vallecito, CO cut beautiful 20' trees...

I have never had the space for more than a 6'er!

While living in a 12' by 62' (?) trailer, I used to ask daddy to look for me a tree growing up against another. A nice little ladder tree, 3' tall and flat sided!!!

Thjs way I could put the tree up against the wall and still have space to get by to the kitchen!!!:rolleyes:

Screenshot_20211201-122655_Google.jpg

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3 hours ago, Dawg Hair, SASS #29557 said:

Only thing I'm putting up for Christmas in a big blowup Grinch in the front yard.............if I can find one.

 

3 hours ago, Singin' Sue 71615 said:

Walmart sells a Grinch sleeper....and I hear places sell blow up dolls....so there ya go!!!

Well, @Dawg Hair, SASS #29557 already has the blow up doll...  [ducks and runs]

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While the tree hung from the hook we would trim back branches until it was snug in the corner. Then we would cut out the door opening. After trying to get the first one back outside and having needles on the floor and everywhere for eternity, we learned to put a bed sheet under it when setting up and then cut the branches off and carry it out in the sheet. The trunk went out in one piece and got turned into campfire wood. Most of them grew another 1/2 - 3/4 of an inch while in the house. Drank about 2 gallons of water a day! Used a 5 gal. bucket and rocks for a stand and wrapped the sheet over it to hide the bucket.

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I found putting sand in a 5 gal bucket, putting the live tree in, and then filling with water... was a win-win!

The water helped the sand 'suck' the tree into the sand...and also helped keep the tree from falling over with the little ones!

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Wish I knew how to post pictures.....The first Christmas I was married my Aunt Gerry (my best friend from day one) knitted me 18 ornaments.  They were based on traditional Christmas figures and carols (Christmas is coming, the geese are getting fat).  Over the years the line expanded, including a baseball player (representing my Dad), Betsy Ross (as my daughter had portrayed in a school play), and on and on.  The rule at my house was, if a fire breaks out, save my cat and my Christmas ornaments.  Baby Girl has them now, as we gather at her house for Christmas.

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Back in the 1950's, we would go visit my aunt, and she had some ornaments on her tree that I've not seen before, or since. 

If memory serves, it resembled a kind of "eye-dropper", with a colored liquid in it, and when the tree lights were turned on, it would light up, and produce bubbles flowing in the "eye-dropper". It was so neat. 

Question: Does anyone else remember, or perhaps have, any tree ornaments like this? 

I haven't seen one since about 1958 or '59, or so. It was fascinating for a small boy to watch. I never forgot it. 

 

 

Oh well....time to turn on my black and white Emerson T.V., with a real wood cabinet, and watch the Perry Como show, while drinking a glass of grape Fizzies, and eating some jiffy-pop popcorn that we popped on the stove top, and had that aluminum foil mushroom as it popped and burned.

All that, and no air-conditioning.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Waxahachie Kid #17017 L said:

Back in the 1950's, we would go visit my aunt, and she had some ornaments on her tree that I not seen before, or since. 

If memory serves, it resembled a kind of "eye-dropper", with a colored liquid in it, and when the tree lights were turned on, it would light up, and produce bubbles flowing in the "eye-dropper". It was so neat. 

Question: Does anyone else remember, or perhaps have, any tree ornaments like this? 

I haven't seen one since about 1958 or '59, or so. It was fascinating for a small boy to watch. I never forgot it. 

 

 

Oh well....time to turn on my black and white Emerson T.V., with a real wood cabinet, and watch the Perry Como show, while drinking a glass of grape Fizzies, and eating some jiffy-pop popcorn that we popped on the stove top, and had that aluminum foil mushroom as it popped and burned.

All that, and no air-conditioning.   

 

(Music playing) Thanks...for the memmories...

 

Yes...the glass, filled with colored liquid...ours were twists (like Taco Bell cinnamon twists)

I also recall the glass beads on a stringer.

What I don't recall is a Dec 23rd visit to the Dr in 1965 to remove said bulb from inside my left nostril.

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8E49E503-8479-4406-8208-684B0593DC4C.thumb.jpeg.f032a27591a3a903ed3fbfb757b0b289.jpeg

Two years ago I carved about 24 of these and gave them out to friends and family. I have two on my tree. They are early attempts that were experimental.  They are carved from a square stick like the one at the top.
They are 5” long and have two sides with the face on each side. Each face ended up a little different which made it interesting. It was a lot of fun seeing the reactions of those I could hand them to personally. 


 

CJ

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10 hours ago, Cactus Jack Calder said:

8E49E503-8479-4406-8208-684B0593DC4C.thumb.jpeg.f032a27591a3a903ed3fbfb757b0b289.jpeg

Two years ago I carved about 24 of these and gave them out to friends and family. I have two on my tree. They are early attempts that were experimental.  They are carved from a square stick like the one at the top.
They are 5” long and have two sides with the face on each side. Each face ended up a little different which made it interesting. It was a lot of fun seeing the reactions of those I could hand them to personally. 


 

CJ

Those are fantastic!!!

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14 hours ago, Waxahachie Kid #17017 L said:

Back in the 1950's, we would go visit my aunt, and she had some ornaments on her tree that I not seen before, or since. 

If memory serves, it resembled a kind of "eye-dropper", with a colored liquid in it, and when the tree lights were turned on, it would light up, and produce bubbles flowing in the "eye-dropper". It was so neat. 

Question: Does anyone else remember, or perhaps have, any tree ornaments like this? 

I haven't seen one since about 1958 or '59, or so. It was fascinating for a small boy to watch. I never forgot it. 

 

 

Oh well....time to turn on my black and white Emerson T.V., with a real wood cabinet, and watch the Perry Como show, while drinking a glass of grape Fizzies, and eating some jiffy-pop popcorn that we popped on the stove top, and had that aluminum foil mushroom as it popped and burned.

All that, and no air-conditioning.   

 

Yeah we had a string of bubble lights. They still make them! The old ones are very collectible these days.

 

Of course life contains a particle of risk.

 

Quote

 

History of Bubble Lights

First introduced in 1956, bubble lights are brightly colored, made of glass and shaped liked a candle with a wide base and narrow tube. They were developed by the NOMA Electric Corporation. Although they are not as popular today nor as safe and energy-efficient as LED Christmas lights, they are a fun alternative to consider when decorating for the holidays.

You can string bubble lights on your tree or display them on a mantle or windowsill. Some people enjoy using bubble lights as a centerpiece.

How Do Bubble Lights Work?

Bubble lights provide beautiful colors and moving light as the bubbles move through the liquid. So, how does a bubble light work? The glass tubes of the lights are filled with the liquid chemical methylene chloride, which has a very low boiling point. When the lights are turned on, the methylene chloride begins to boil, and the bubbles are illuminated by the light in the base.

For a period of time, the company Raylite made bubble lights out of oil and pumice, which bubbled when combined. However, these lights were discontinued.

Each light is designed as a bulb that can be screwed in. This means that you can replace individual bubble lights without replacing the entire string. In addition, the strings are generally wired so that if one light goes out, the other lights are not affected.

Dangers of Bubble Lights

Large bubble lights make wonderful decorations, but they can be dangerous for pets and children. When decorating with bubble lights, make sure that the lights remain upright at all times. In addition, the glass tube of the light is fairly fragile, so handle the lights with care so that you don't break the light.

If you do break the bubble light, keep children and pets away from the broken light. Not only can the shards of glass cause injury but the methylene chloride is also highly toxic when it contacts the skin or is inhaled or ingested. The body converts the chemical into carbon dioxide and causes symptoms of carbon dioxide poisoning, including drowsiness, headache, nausea and vomiting. In severe cases, it can cause coma, heart attack, seizures and death.

If you or your children come into contact with methylene chloride, call poison control or your doctor right away for treatment. If your pets come into contact with the chemical, call your veterinarian, the Pet Poison Helpline or the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Poison Control Center. Do not attempt to give any home remedies or attempt to induce vomiting unless instructed to do so by a doctor, veterinarian or poison control center.

 

 

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This is my Christmas project for 2021. Much simpler to carve. They are made from a 1” cube of wood, carved and dipped into a white wash type paint. 214FE7D7-726A-4A91-AA9D-9EB5FF280958.thumb.jpeg.5febac3d2ab196358afb097895c313b3.jpeg
 

CJ

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On 12/1/2021 at 7:42 PM, Singin' Sue 71615 said:

What I don't recall is a Dec 23rd visit to the Dr in 1965 to remove said bulb from inside my left nostril.

 

Now why is that is not surprising?

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I miss the days when we would go out in search of a Christmas tree. We never had a pine always a cedar. 

 

When I got older I remember going to Great Grandma's farm and searching the pastures and fence rows for just the right tree. I started looking when hunting season opened. Some years it was tough finding one that was filled out properly. When I found one I would make a map so that I could go back to it a week or two before Christmas. We never put up any Christmas decorations before Thanksgiving.

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On 12/1/2021 at 8:48 AM, Dawg Hair, SASS #29557 said:

Only thing I'm putting up for Christmas in a big blowup Grinch in the front yard.............if I can find one.

 

89F04D52-BE01-479B-AB8E-0300D37C7B5F.jpeg

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Mama split up the lovely old delicate ornament bulbs she inherited from her Grandma Welker.

Each of my siblings and I hung them on our trees.

My brother's tree fell, spontaneously, no cats, kids, earthquakes ... unfortunately, those fragile old ornaments shattered.

Every last one of 'em.

I gave him all mine.

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