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Spurs


Buckshot Bear

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I have large rowel spurs and they drag the ground as I walk which is annoying as I find myself stepping differently than normal. My boot heels appear taller than your heels and I don't see a nice spur shelf for them to rest on. I see all of that adding up to trouble walking or moving during a stage.

 

http://cowboyway.com/What/SpurLedge.htm

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As with anything else, you get what you pay for.  They look nice.

 

I tried out B-Western for a while and bought inexpensive spurs and straps.  They worked and looked ok and met the requirements of the category.  I had trouble with my boots.  They did not have a spur shelf on the heel.  It looks like you might have the same problem with yours.  I ended up putting a small screw horizontally in the rear of the boot heel where a spur shelf should be.  Functions well and was not visible with the spurs in place.  

 

Good luck!

 

Chancy

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Buckshot Bear said:

Ok I've learnt something thanks, they're Ariat boots and I haven't ever heard of a 'spur shelf' before. I might be shelving this plan.

Unless you have to have the jingle of the spurs, get some cavalry spurs that are basically just a stub sticking out. They are less of a trip hazard. f you have a tendency to slide sideways in a stage by swinging one leg behind the other, you will catch a spur with your toe.

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Not sure if cavalry spurs are legal for B western. Those boots don’t really look like they have a spur heel

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B-Grade Western:

image.thumb.png.055d4dc23ef799a021fead020994790a.png

 

Classic Cowboy:

 

image.png.00d44d346fe04754f434bdd0b4d0bea3.png

 

For costume categories rowels are required so that seems to rule out cavalry spurs. Bummer.

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22 minutes ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

We don't ride horses...and spurs are a tripping hazard!

 

:ph34r:

 

I don't walk around all the time with two six guns, a Winchester and a double barrelled shotgun..... It's a chance to enjoy some cowboy fantasy fun and spurs and cowboys go together. 

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8 minutes ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

My thoughts are, if you don't need them to make category, leave them at home. The less folks wear spurs at a match, the better.

 

Cheers!
Phantom

BALDERDASH!!!!

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Your Guide To Cowboy Boot Heel Types | Blog | Western Boot Barnlots

Lots of heels type. Yours are flat for walking, roper style,  and no spur shelf, 1/8 - 3/16" of the heel extended to hold the spur and not have it slide to the ground.  The yoke of the spur, the "Y", needs to fit your boot so your heel is not pinched. It is uncomfortable and can cause blisters if not fitted right.  Along with your spur straps there should be a chain strap under the boot in the instep. The need for that is to keep the rowels up, notice how most of the cowboy heel sides are sloped, that helps keep the rowels from dragging.  Have fun, get crazy and listen to them jangles!  Music to my ears!:)

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3 minutes ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

My thoughts are, if you don't need them to make category, leave them at home. The less folks wear spurs at a match, the better.

 

Cheers!
Phantom

I would agree to a point. If I'm in Tombstone and savoring the moment, I'm wearing the spurs. If I am at a monthly match, I often try to find a way to get to my required costume element count without using the spurs. With spurs on I do watch how I walk when moving in a stage. I don't slide anymore, I turn and step.

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I want spurs like Hopalong Cassidy; they jingled at every step but yet the bad guys never heard him sneaking up on them!

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41 minutes ago, Cholla said:

Unless you have to have the jingle of the spurs, get some cavalry spurs that are basically just a stub sticking out. They are less of a trip hazard. f you have a tendency to slide sideways in a stage by swinging one leg behind the other, you will catch a spur with your toe.

Cavalry spurs have a small rowel on them. As with the cowboy spurs, if you're not paying attention, your boots will pay for it.

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Almost all are stages around, movement is parallel to the firing line and I tend to scuff toes of boots badly.     GW

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4 minutes ago, Hendo said:

Cavalry spurs have a small rowel on them. As with the cowboy spurs, if you're not paying attention, your boots will pay for it.

I am more concerned with falling. When I first started wearing them I stumbled a time or two. Now I make deliberate steps. My knees are to the point that I can't squat anymore so getting poked in the hinee is no longer a danger!

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26 minutes ago, Caladisi kid said:

Your Guide To Cowboy Boot Heel Types | Blog | Western Boot Barnlots

Lots of heels type. Yours are flat for walking, roper style,  and no spur shelf, 1/8 - 3/16" of the heel extended to hold the spur and not have it slide to the ground.  The yoke of the spur, the "Y", needs to fit your boot so your heel is not pinched. It is uncomfortable and can cause blisters if not fitted right.  Along with your spur straps there should be a chain strap under the boot in the instep. The need for that is to keep the rowels up, notice how most of the cowboy heel sides are sloped, that helps keep the rowels from dragging.  Have fun, get crazy and listen to them jangles!  Music to my ears!:)

 

Thanks for that information :)

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2 minutes ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

Yeah...wearing spurs and running around on foot...exactly what spurs were made for:lol:

 

 

If only we could be carrying loaded guns, too!   :lol:

 

 

p.s.  I admit that I wear spurs at almost every match.

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 Buckshot,  Just remember,:rolleyes: ta look like the part,  ya got ta have the parts!  

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The spur shown above is the in the first slide is to be worn on the right boot.  The part that is protruding up directly in front of the rowel is called the chap guard.  In  a perfect world it will keep a full length shotgun chap from getting into the rowel.  The following has always become a point of discussion or argument but normally the buckle on the spur strap goes to the outside and the top spur strap goes on the right foot.  Jingle bobs are always a nice touch except when sneaking up on anything.  I know of some horses that will tend to be rather spirited until they hear the sound of jingle bobs, the horse would associate the sound with spurs.  Remember spurs are not designed to hurt or injure the horse, the spur is a extension of the riders leg which is designed to press or roll along side the the horse to get the horse to move in a specific manner.  Kinda like someone pushing their finger into your ribs to get you to move aside.  There is no mystery to walking with spurs on, just remember you have them on.  A rule in my trucks is "no spurs"  while in the truck, they damage interiors.  Boots with a spur shelf work best with spurs, you can use them on boots without but you may have to reshape the spurs slightly so they wrap around the boot in a snug manner.  I do like Chancy Shots idea on the small wood screw on the heel to help hold the spur up.

 

Hope this helps out......

 

Here is an example of what I am talking about.....

001.JPG

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