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Subdeacon Joe
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The closest thing you could find in modern times might be a certain former Vice-President's son...  :rolleyes:

 

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[The VP's son's] application for a position in the U. S. Navy Reserve was approved in May 2013.  At age 43, [he] was accepted as part of a program that allows a limited number of applicants with desirable skills to receive commissions and serve in staff positions.  

 

[He] received an age-related waiver and a waiver due to a past drug-related incident; he was sworn in as a direct commission officer.  [His father] administered his commissioning oath in a White House ceremony.  

 

The following month, [he] tested positive for cocaine during a urinalysis test and was subsequently discharged administratively.  [He] attributed the result to smoking cigarettes he had accepted from other smokers, claiming the cigarettes were laced with cocaine.  He chose not to appeal the matter as it was unlikely that the panel would believe his explanation given his history with drugs.

 

 

In the lad's defense, he probably thought he was smoking parmesan cheese.  :mellow:

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6 hours ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

The closest thing you could find in modern times might be a certain former Vice-President's son...  :rolleyes:

 

 

"Mad" Dan Sickles was quite a guy.

 

Image result for gen. sickles leg

 

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Before the Civil War, Daniel E. Sickles had been a diplomat in London and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1857 to 1861. While in Congress, Sickles was charged with murder after shooting Philip Barton Key II, the son of “Star-Spangled Banner” author Francis Scott Key. Key had been engaged in an affair with Sickles' wife, and Sickles shot and killed Key in Lafayette Square across from the White House. Sickles was found not guilty by reason of temporary insanity, the first such verdict of its kind in the United States.

At Gettysburg, however, Sickles' reputation increased exponentially and not necessarily in his favor. On the battle's second day, then-Major General Sickles defied orders and advanced his III Corps ahead of Union lines, exposing much of the Union center to Confederate attack. III Corps was effectively wiped out, and while astride his horse, Sickles was struck in the lower right leg with a 12-lb cannonball. The leg was amputated by Surgeon Thomas Sim that afternoon at the III Corps' battlefield hospital. The story of the leg, however, did not end there on the Taneytown Road.

Aware of the recent founding of the Army Medical Museum, known today as the NMHM, Sickles directed his surgeon to dispatch the amputated leg, according to the anecdote,1 in a small coffin-shaped box. The museum had begun collecting “specimens of morbid anatomy”2 for preservation and study. Sickles' shattered tibia and fibula were received at the Army Medical Museum where it was prepared and mounted for display, much in the same manner as it is still seen today (Fig. 1). Sickles quickly recovered and returned to duty. He occasionally visited the leg on the anniversary of its amputation.

 

Image result for gen. sickles leg

 

 

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5 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

"Mad" Dan Sickles was quite a guy.

 

 

"...and while astride his horse, Sickles was struck in the lower right leg with a 12-lb cannonball..."

 

Poor horse didn't get much sympathy.  :huh:  :rolleyes:

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Might not have been a broadside. Might have been a head-on shot, in which case the horse might not have got touched. Especially if he was trying to get the horse to gallop, and had his legs out stretched from the barrel, proud of PRIOR TO bringing them back in and jabbing his spurs in.

Edited by Alpo
proud of? damn otto
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2 hours ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

 

"...and while astride his horse, Sickles was struck in the lower right leg with a 12-lb cannonball..."

 

Poor horse didn't get much sympathy.  :huh:  :rolleyes:

 

Looking at the leg bone I suspect that it hit the front of his leg and that the ball had grazed (bounced) several times, and thus had lost most of its energy, before hitting him.

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