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Question about a murder


Alpo
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If you were suffocated with CO2, would they be able to prove it?

 

I understand, from various and sundry crime TV shows, that if you were killed by CO, your skin would be "cherry red".

 

But if you were suffocated using carbon dioxide, would there be obvious signs - skin turn blue or green or purple or anything else (seems like I've heard about the fingernails turning blue from lack of oxygen)?

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36 minutes ago, Alpo said:

If you were suffocated with CO2, would they be able to prove it?

 

I understand, from various and sundry crime TV shows, that if you were killed by CO, your skin would be "cherry red".

 

But if you were suffocated using carbon dioxide, would there be obvious signs - skin turn blue or green or purple or anything else (seems like I've heard about the fingernails turning blue from lack of oxygen)?

 

image.png.603e8ff8db38e81bd6b58d09edd21644.pngNervous | Emoticonos, Emoticones para whatsapp gratis, Emoticonos divertidos

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4 minutes ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

You don’t know how to hide your searches?

 

image.png.7b5475388ccad03a06f477e2cfc76cd8.png

GIF steven yeun glenn rhee the walking dead - animated GIF on GIFER - by  Kanos

 

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It's all about time.  If they find the body while still fresh, it's almost impossible to hide the cause of death.  As time passes and the soft tissue breaks down, it becomes more difficult.  After 3-4 weeks exposed to the elements in a warm climate, it could be difficult to determine cause of death unless there were skeletal injuries.

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The old man has decided to commit suicide, so his relatives get the insurance money. Unfortunately all five of his life insurance policies have a suicide exclusion clause.

 

But he has a plan. He sleeps all alone in the bedroom at the top of the tower, five stories above the ground. He always sleeps with the bedroom door locked and the window shut. There is a man that he has had troubles with. He invites the man over that night, then raises hell so that his servants will know that the man was there. After the man has been run off he mentions that the man had been carrying a dog crate. An oversized suitcase with a grating at one end.

 

Actually he had put the dog crate in his bedroom. In the crate is a large amount of dry ice. As the ice melts and fills the room with CO2 he will suffocate. He will be found dead in the morning, and his murder will be blamed on the guy he doesn't like. Win win.

 

Unfortunately the instinct to survive overpowered the plan to suicide, and half unconscious from the gas he gets out of bed and goes to throw open the window to let the air in, stumbles over the one foot high windowsill and falls out the six foot high window, 50 feet to the stone castle floor beneath him.

 

He does not die immediately, but lies there in pain, breathing, with his body expelling the excess CO2, and any evidence of being killed by CO2, before finally expiring from the fall.

 

And they're trying to decide if he jumped or if he was pushed.

 

That's the plot - now you don't have to read the book - but but I was wondering if his plan has succeeded, and he had died in his bedroom, would his body give evidence of what he died?

 

I would assume that, once they broke the bedroom door down, they would have found the air in the room to be foul. That would probably be a clue.

 

But if there would be no evidence of foul play on the body, then I suppose it would be considered natural causes, and the insurance company will still pay out. Eventually. Maybe.

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12 minutes ago, Father Kit Cool Gun Garth said:

 

image.png.7b5475388ccad03a06f477e2cfc76cd8.png

GIF steven yeun glenn rhee the walking dead - animated GIF on GIFER - by  Kanos

 

Use Duck Duck Go 

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There must be variations, but most states have insurance laws that provide that life policies are incontestable after 2 years, or some such period.

 

It's a common misconception that suicide is usually excluded. It's excluded for 2 years, to prevent policies being bought in contemplation of suicide. So, one would need to plan ahead, and suicides usually don't; that far anyway.

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No need. Y'all have already assisted me with that several times.

 

Besides, no body, no proof of death, so no insurance payout. Need to have the body.

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33 minutes ago, Red Gauntlet , SASS 60619 said:

There must be variations, but most states have insurance laws that provide that life policies are incontestable after 2 years, or some such period.

 

It's a common misconception that suicide is usually excluded. It's excluded for 2 years, to prevent policies being bought in contemplation of suicide. So, one would need to plan ahead, and suicides usually don't; that far anyway.

One of the Spenser books. The old man committed suicide. His young, pretty, not so bright (yes she was blonde) wife found him and immediately realized that - OH NO! THE INSURANCE WILL NOT PAY ON A SUICIDE!!

 

So she framed the suicide to look like a murder. And became the prime suspect, which was why Spenser was brought in.

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4 hours ago, Alpo said:

 

 

Unfortunately the instinct to survive overpowered the plan to suicide, and half unconscious from the gas he gets out of bed and goes to throw open the window to let the air in, stumbles over the one foot high windowsill and falls out the six foot high window, 50 feet to the stone castle floor beneath him.

 

 NO BACKSIES!

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They must be against code for high up. I remember my brother complaining. He built a house in Maryland, and wanted to have the bedroom windows at the three-foot level. He said they had to be at 14 inches, so that firemen could gain access.

 

Nobody in the Maryland building code apparently thought that burglars would also gain access.

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Helium is a better choice.
One does not gasp with helium... just goes to sleep and croaks.
Nobody tests for exotic gasses in the blood stream when death appears to be natural causes.

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And don't forget to make sure the body is cremated.  None of this exhuming the body later for further testing business once suspicions are aroused.   This is especially relevant in spousal antifreeze poisonings, but that's a different Alpo conversation.

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Suicide clause in an insurance policy not being paid?.....if the policy is past the two year exclusion period, it is paid.

 

Yes, I was an insurance agent for 24 years.............

 

Bugler

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On 9/23/2021 at 1:31 PM, Red Gauntlet , SASS 60619 said:

There must be variations, but most states have insurance laws that provide that life policies are incontestable after 2 years, or some such period.

 

It's a common misconception that suicide is usually excluded. It's excluded for 2 years, to prevent policies being bought in contemplation of suicide. So, one would need to plan ahead, and suicides usually don't; that far anyway.

State better than my response.....and totally accurate.

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