Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Fires in CA


Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217 said:

What is "Nvm?"

 

Nevermind

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Read an article where US Forrest head is instructing firefighters to put out each and every fire immediately once begun...in otherwords, not to 'just let it burn'.

Don't get me wrong...prescribed burns and letting fire take its course in some situations are a good thing...just not during drought and FIRE SEASON.

Stay safe!

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know that drought is a factor in the wild fires, and lightning strikes, and arson....but....is the state of California not doing something they really need to do, or...are they doing something that they should not be doing? Are state governmental policies one of the causes of these wild fires? 

We hear all kinds of things, but those of us that don't live there, really don't know...or...understand.

Growing up, I just do not remember hearing much, if anything, about large/destructive wild fires there.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two things:
#1 - the hippies have tied up responsible logging in the courts for decades.
This means they cannot log dead material and clear duff.
All those spotted owls and other little critters they wanted to protect have since burned to death.

#2 - the climate is drying out.
Those who grew up in the dense fog of the San Francisco avenues district, tell me the fog is a thing of the past.
A dryer climate provides more fuel to burn.

When the wind blows, power lines go down.
When they go down on top of a few feet of burnable duff, fires start.

Throw in the political arm twisting to shy away from basic maintenance and invest the farm in wind and green energy... and you are ripe for infrastructure fires.

Nature designed CA to burn.
Those wanting to live in fire prone areas can either manage the fire danger, or they can burn.
The vast number of acres burned every year indicates which choice was made.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, Waxahachie Kid #17017 L said:

I know that drought is a factor in the wild fires, and lightning strikes, and arson....but....is the state of California not doing something they really need to do, or...are they doing something that they should not be doing? Are state governmental policies one of the causes of these wild fires? 

We hear all kinds of things, but those of us that don't live there, really don't know...or...understand.

Growing up, I just do not remember hearing much, if anything, about large/destructive wild fires there.

 

 

 

Hooo boy... now, there's a right smelly bag o' worms.  There are many things at play here, and the view from MY saddle is that central to the overall issue is "environmentalism."  In this, again from MY view, are two major components - interference with power companies mitigation processes, and forest management policies.

 

Regarding the first, the larger power companies (Pacific Gas and Electric and Southern California Edison) have historically kept their high-power transmission line right-of-ways clear cut.  This prevented these lines from arcing to trees during high winds and starting fires.  But for a number of years now, "environment activist groups" have filed lawsuits which have effectively blocked the companies from the planned tree and brush clearing - 'tain't "natural," don'tcha know.  No clearing, trees and brush grow near the power lines, and when winds blow strongly the lines arc and fires start.

 

And the politicians (we all know which way they lean!) jump at the opportunity to blame the "rich" power companies.  (Who are fined heavily and pass on the cost of those fines with rate increases - ours just announced a planned jump of 18%)

 

Now, the second: forest management policy.  Again historically, the forest service "managed" the forests.  Over-simplified, but basically, they would manage leases which would allow for harvesting trees, providing revenue to the service, providing material for an industry, and most importantly, controlling the tree "population."  With the destruction of the lumber industry by the environmentalists (remember that poor, victimized Spotted Owl?), there was no harvesting.  As a result, there are literally too many trees - according to friends of mine who are foresters and members of Cal Fire (former the California Department of Forestry), much of the state's forest land now has up to six times as many trees as a healthy forest.  I myself have been in parts of the Sierras where the trees are literally too crowded to walk through.

 

Now, trees can transpire an incredible amount of water - as a general rule of thumb, a healthy pine tree (comparable to other evergreens) will consume ten gallons of water per day per inch of trunk diameter.  Or, a healthy tree with a 15" diameter will transpire 150 gallons of water.  Every day.  Now let's say that an acre of healthy forest land would normally support about 80 trees (this will, of course, vary with elevation, terrain, etc.).  So, with the crowding of today's forests, that same acre of forest land might now be crowded with nearly 500 trees.  Each sucking up water.  Or trying to...

 

With the so-called "drought" of recent years, water is in short abundance.  So the trees, already crowded and competing for both dirt and sky, are now competing for water.  And are extremely "stressed."  This stressing has weakened them to a point where they are highly susceptible to insect damage.  And now we have literally millions of dead or dying trees in the California forests.  (As an aside, this also diverts much water from reaching the aquifers).

 

And, of course, these dead and dying trees are literally a tinderbox, ready to go up with a single spark from a power line, lightning strike, "careless hunter," or mad professor.

 

(Oh... compounding the problem is the issue of "fire trails."  These were narrow paths through the forests, maintained by the Forest Service,  which allowed access for fire-fighters and equipment.  But during the oversight of a certain Secretary of the Interior (Bruce Babbitt?), these fire trails began to disappear.  They were blocked with soil "berms," and allowed to become overgrown.  After all, they weren't "natural!")

 

And what do the "leaders" of our state have to say about this?

 

"Why... this just PROVES Global Warming and Climate Change!  And it's all the other party's fault!"  :(

 

 

 

66 million dead trees contribute to fire hazard in California | CNN

 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 3
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

 

Hooo boy... now, there's a right smelly bag o' worms.  There are many things at play here, and the view from MY saddle is that central to the overall issue is "environmentalism."  In this, again from MY view, are two major components - interference with power companies mitigation processes, and forest management policies.

 

Regarding the first, the larger power companies (Pacific Gas and Electric and Southern California Edison) have historically kept their high-power transmission line right-of-ways clear cut.  This prevented these lines from arcing to trees during high winds and starting fires.  But for a number of years now, "environment activist groups" have filed lawsuits which have effectively blocked the companies from the planned tree and brush clearing - 'tain't "natural," don'tcha know.  No clearing, trees and brush grow near the power lines, and when winds blow strongly the lines arc and fires start.

 

And the politicians (we all know which way they lean!) jump at the opportunity to blame the "rich" power companies.  (Who are fined heavily and pass on the cost of those fines with rate increases - ours just announced a planned jump of 18%)

 

Now, the second: forest management policy.  Again historically, the forest service "managed" the forests.  Over-simplified, but basically, they would manage leases which would allow for harvesting trees, providing revenue to the service, providing material for an industry, and most importantly, controlling the tree "population."  With the destruction of the lumber industry by the environmentalists (remember that poor, victimized Spotted Owl?), there was no harvesting.  As a result, there are literally too many trees - according to friends of mine who are foresters and members of Cal Fire (former the California Department of Forestry), much of the state's forest land now has up to six times as many trees as a healthy forest.  I myself have been in parts of the Sierras where the trees are literally too crowded to walk through.

 

Now, trees can transpire an incredible amount of water - as a general rule of thumb, a healthy pine tree (comparable to other evergreens) will consume ten gallons of water per day per inch of trunk diameter.  Or, a healthy tree with a 15" diameter will transpire 150 gallons of water.  Every day.  Now let's say that an acre of healthy forest land would normally support about 80 trees (this will, of course, vary with elevation, terrain, etc.).  So, with the crowding of today's forests, that same acre of forest land might now be crowded with nearly 500 trees.  Each sucking up water.  Or trying to...

 

With the so-called "drought" of recent years, water is in short abundance.  So the trees, already crowded and competing for both dirt and sky, are now competing for water.  And are extremely "stressed."  This stressing has weakened them to a point where they are highly susceptible to insect damage.  And now we have literally millions of dead or dying trees in the California forests.  (As an aside, this also diverts much water from reaching the aquifers).

 

And, of course, these dead and dying trees are literally a tinderbox, ready to go up with a single spark from a power line, lightning strike, "careless hunter," or mad professor.

 

(Oh... compounding the problem is the issue of "fire trails."  These were narrow paths through the forests, maintained by the Forest Service,  which allowed access for fire-fighters and equipment.  But during the oversight of a certain Secretary of the Interior (Bruce Babbitt?), these fire trails began to disappear.  They were blocked with soil "berms," and allowed to become overgrown.  After all, they weren't "natural!")

 

And what do the "leaders" of our state have to say about this?

 

"Why... this just PROVES Global Warming and Climate Change!  And it's all the other party's fault!"  :(

 

 

 

66 million dead trees contribute to fire hazard in California | CNN

 

You nailed it brother...all across the board.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, bgavin said:

This is the worst air quality I've ever seen.
Even worse that last year.
 

image.fires.aqi.2021.08.20.sfw.jpg

 

I committed to Sawmill Mary just today that the air smells like fumes from sawing concrete.  (Even though we're in mid-Missouri)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They just nailed some crazy woman for setting a fire at Lake Tahoe.
She was dressed only a  bikini, covered with cuts and smoke debris, drugs, drug paraphernalia and resisting arrest.
They booked her into El Dorado county jail for the time being.

And another Biden voter bites the dust.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/20/2021 at 12:52 PM, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

Hooo boy... now, there's a right smelly bag o' worms.....

 

A perfect analysis, Hardpan. 

May I copy it and put it on my FB?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

A perfect analysis, Hardpan. 

May I copy it and put it on my FB?

 

Go for it! ^_^

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/19/2021 at 1:16 PM, Tall Tale Todd said:

I keep hearing whispers about activating us (CA National Guard) to support the wildfire mission.

Hi Todd,

 

I've been accessing Flightradar24. Also, I've clicked on planes and found some identified as Guard.

 

Thank you and/or your brother/sister Guards.

 

AM

 

PS

 This is an interesting map that shows dozer lines on the area closest to us. It's still about 6 miles away.

caldor822brief

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217 said:

Hi Todd,

 

I've been accessing Flightradar24. Also, I've clicked on planes and found some identified as Guard.

 

Thank you and/or your brother/sister Guards.

 

AM

 

PS

 This is an interesting map that shows dozer lines on the area closest to us. It's still about 6 miles away.

caldor822brief

Hey, Miss Allie. Nice to meet you (virtually).

 

Yep, the 144th FW (my unit) flies regularly in support of air sovereignty on the west coast. 

 

The Army Guard is always very busy this time of year. They start pulling from the Air when they're either short of bodies or need a specific skill set. 

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm working on this fire Allie and it is a monster.  It's been kind of a sleeper where it behaves like a fire all day then just when they think they can work with it, it rears its ugly head and gobbles up land like it was nothing.  If there's even a suggestion of evacuation, don't wait.  The Sheriff has folks out there to watch your home so get to safety and worry about yourself/husband first.  

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217 said:

Hey Jim,

 

Thank you for working on it.

 

Here's the CalFire map from this am. We are six miles S. of it. That dozer line on the SW is making things look hopeful.

 

May be an image of map

Hopefully the wind stays with us to keep the fire from pushing against the dozer line.  This fire will travel 1.5 mph if it is wind driven so stay alert and safe.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hardpan has confirmed what others have told me! It is almost beyond belief that the citizens of California have allowed a bunch of IDIOTS to do this to their homes!!


ALMOST!!


We are to be keepers and preservers of the land!!  The misguided tree huggers do not understand that doing nothing is far worse than anything else we could do!!

 

 

 

Edited by Blackwater 53393
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Blackwater 53393 said:

It is almost beyond belief that the citizens of California have allowed a bunch of IDIOTS to do this to their homes!!

 

Too many people vote for panem et circenses.

Edited by Subdeacon Joe
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Blackwater 53393 said:

Hardpan has confirmed what others have told me! It is almost beyond belief that the citizens of California have allowed a bunch of IDIOTS to do this to their homes!!


ALMOST!!


We are to be keepers and preservers of the land!!  The misguided tree huggers do not understand that doing nothing is far worse than anything else we could do!!

 

 

 

 

And please keep in mind, most of the people who brought this nonsense about came from elsewhere.  :mellow:

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

Too many people vote for panem et circenses.


This would be funny if it weren’t tragically true!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217 said:

I just posted this. Is nowhere safe?

 

 

I can certainly agree with the WACKOS!!  Whether it’s outside terrorists or just the usual garden variety idiots is still a matter of conjecture, but as a terrorist activity, it would certainly work as a depletion of resources and or a distraction from our usual vigilance!!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.