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Camp cooking question


Alpo
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You are camping. You hiked in. Not carrying anything heavy. No cast iron. No Dutch oven.


Do you think you could cook a can of whop biscuits?


Yes Pat, it's in a story. I'm just curious how the boy is doing it with his boy scout mess kit.

 

 

 

 

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If I was gonna cook biscuits in such a setting (I did a LOT of backpacking in my younger days) no way I'd used canned. For starters they'd likely explode and or sour out of a cooler. I'd use Pioneer mix (similar to Bisquik but better). I guess you could cook some up in an aluminum pan, but would likely burn. Be better to take some already cooked.

JHC

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Wrapped around a stick like Bannock bread. I have also cooked biscuit in a flat rock oven fired hot on the plate side of the boys out mess kit. Rotating 1/4 turn toward the fire after I knocked the fire out of the oven.

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32 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

SOP.  Cook 'em on a  stick over the fire. 

I was thinking of that. Seems like, many long years ago, I heard about making twist using whop biscuit dough. Wasn't sure whether I was hallucinating or not though. You know how it is when you get old - sometimes you remember stuff that didn't happen.

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28 minutes ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

If I was gonna cook biscuits in such a setting (I did a LOT of backpacking in my younger days) no way I'd used canned. For starters they'd likely explode and or sour out of a cooler. I'd use Pioneer mix (similar to Bisquik but better). I guess you could cook some up in an aluminum pan, but would likely burn. Be better to take some already cooked.

JHC

This was only an overnighter. Had a soft side cooler for their supper hot dogs and their breakfast eggs.

 

>Breakfast was sausage patties, a can of hot biscuits, and scrambled eggs. <

 

 

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I found this kind of interesting. I was looking for a reference to making twist using canned biscuit dough, and found this thing from Canadian Boy Scouts.

 

Under "other methods of cooking ":

 

>Ensure that the fluid added just makes a ball of almost sticky dough. Roll the dough into a long, flat rope. Spiral the dough around a green stick and place over camp coals. Remove all embers and ashes before consuming. Remember that Scouts do not cut green sticks from living trees.<

 

I'm pretty sure that that is the only way you can get green sticks, is to cut them from living trees. If the tree is down and dead, it's not a green stick anymore. It's deadwood

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I seem to recall some scouts at a camp ground in Big Bear CA trying to make biscuits from a tube in aluminum mess kits. They had a mess, all right. :lol:
They were pretty happy it was an experiment and not dinner. Burnt on the outside, gooey in the center. Yum! :blink:

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Scoutie outing, Pinnacles National Park, many years ago.  Not backpacking, but fun.  The biscuits came later!  ^_^

 

 

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You don't need a green stick if you have a good water supply.  Simply take off all the bark and soak the stick for an hour or so.  Avoid conifers.  They taste terrible because of the sap.  Sane reason I stopped eating venison taken in the Wasatch Range.  They live on pine trees and taste like crap matinated in kerosene.

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20 hours ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

If I was gonna cook biscuits in such a setting (I did a LOT of backpacking in my younger days) no way I'd used canned. For starters they'd likely explode and or sour out of a cooler. I'd use Pioneer mix (similar to Bisquik but better). I guess you could cook some up in an aluminum pan, but would likely burn. Be better to take some already cooked.

JHC

Cap'n, I've seen Pioneer brand in the stores around here, but never really paid attention to it. After your recommendation I did a little websearch.

 

What does it cost where you live? The one hit where it had a price, a 40 oz box - that's 2 and 1/2 lb - is $15. $15 for two and a half pounds of flour???

 

https://www.amazon.com/Pioneer-Brand-Original-Biscuit-Baking/dp/B007WIMU6A/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=pioneer+baking+mix&qid=1627508796&sr=8-4

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Backpacking? Not on my back! That's why the Lord made horses!

 

:rolleyes:

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Put the raw biscuits into an aluminum foil envelope, crimp seal the sides.  Put some coals over and under the aluminum package.  Pull them out of coals when you are so hungry you don’t care if they are done or not.

 

Eat, enjoy, crawl into your sleeping bag.  Try not to think about bears.

 

 I am so grateful I don’t have to camp anymore.

 

 

 

 

Edited by J-BAR #18287
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1 hour ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

Put the raw biscuits into an aluminum foil envelope, crimp seal the sides.  Put some coals over and under the aluminum package.  Pull them out of coals when you are so hungry you don’t care if they are done or not.

 

Eat, enjoy, crawl into your sleeping bag.  Try not to think about bears.

 

 I am so grateful I don’t have to camp anymore.

 

 

 

 

 

I endorse this, all but the last sentence. About 15 years ago, at age 58, I started backpacking again, having not done so since Scout days; though I always did tons of car camping with my kids.

 

I'm still doing it, at 73. The trick? One nighters only. That way you can carry steaks and wine, eggs and bacon, etc-- and biscuit dough.

 

I used to go in 7 miles. Now I go in 3. But a still love sleeping in the backcountry 2 or 3 times per summer, if only for a night at a time.

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What I was taught with the stick method was to form it into a cup on the end of the stick.   Then when you pull it off or the stick you put the butter and honey in the hole.

 

If you have mess kits you grease the beejeebers out of them, put the dough in one, use the other for a lid,  if you have it, wrap them in foil.  Did a hole,  put some coals in it, then about an inch of dirt, the mess kits,  cover with about half an inch of dirt, cover with lively coals.  Dig up after about half an hour. 

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6 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

What I was taught with the stick method was to form it into a cup on the end of the stick.   Then when you pull it off or the stick you put the butter and honey in the hole.

That sounds like a good idea

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