Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Tools


Recommended Posts

Tools Explained - : DRILL PRESS:

A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.
 
WIRE WHEEL:
Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, "Oh, s—“
 
SKILL SAW:
A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.
 
PLIERS:
Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.
 
BELT SANDER:
An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.
 
HACKSAW:
One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle ... It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.
 
VISE-GRIPS:
Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.
 
OXYACETYLENE TORCH:
Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you want to remove a bearing race.
 
TABLE SAW:
A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.
 
HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK:
Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.
 
BAND SAW:
A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge.
 
TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST:
A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to disconnect.
 
PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER:
Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.
 
STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER:
A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms.
 
PRY BAR:
A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.
 
HOSE CUTTER:
A tool used to make hoses too short.
 
HAMMER:
Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent to the object we are trying to hit usually smashing the thumb that is holding the object that you are trying to pound into whatever it is that you are working on effectively eliminating the need for manicure care on that thumbnail for weeks. 
 
UTILITY KNIFE:
Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use
 
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 3
  • Haha 21
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wire wheels were designed mostly for European sports cars in order to give drivers a reason to spend time in the garage balancing and tightening them when the SU carburators  and Lucas electronics were already in shape and the car hadn't been driven yet.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Sixgun Sheridan said:

I think you forgot one:

 

DREMEL TOOL:

Empowers wanna-be garage gunsmiths into thinking they're the next Bill Wilson or Wayne Novak. Commonly used to render perfectly good 1911s non-functional.

 

wanna be a gunsmith.jpeg

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

Wire wheels were designed mostly for European sports cars in order to give drivers a reason to spend time in the garage balancing and tightening them when the SU carburators  and Lucas electronics were already in shape and the car hadn't been driven yet.

Dont get me talking about Lucas electronics....1953 MGTD had it, and I completely rewired that beast.  junk

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Muleshoe Bill SASS #67022 said:

Dont get me talking about Lucas electronics....1953 MGTD had it, and I completely rewired that beast.  junk

First thing we'd do is rewire those Brit cars, reverse the polarity, replace all the parts with American stuff, improve the mounting fixtures, and label everydangthing.

 

I finally discovered a man who would make a manifold so we could put Weber carbs on them, too, and in 1968 I bought a Datsun 1600 roadster and my mechanic put in a capacity discharge electronic ignition set up and a tuned exhaust manifold.

 

Add a roll bar, flywheel explosion shield, and three point seat belts and we were track ready.

Edited by Forty Rod SASS 3935
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A jointer is also a great tool for projecting boards into walls like a giant wood dart...

 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Howdy,

Best fix for a brit roadster is to park it somewhere and buy an 

early Miata with a supercharger and roll bar.

And wider wheels and fat tires.

Keep talking about how wonderful the brit car is until

someone offers a nice profit on it.  Sell it.

Then wait for another brit roadster to come along messed up and buy cheap.

Repeat as necessary.

Best

CR

 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking of which, we forgot another one:

 

BOX WRENCH:

Specifically designed to slip off bolt heads and round them off, or to break free the offending bolt upon reaching sufficient torque to cause your hand to fly and strike the nearest razor-sharp edge.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You guys put down Dremel all the time. I’ve been using them since 1978. I’ve owned and burned up three foredoms. I’m own my third Dremel. Cost difference is exceptional. Didn’t over use the foredoms. I kept going to them because of others comments.  If you are talented you can use anything. I know a few that will only use hand tools. No power and they talk against users of any power tools.  Like the guy that uses hand engraving tools for beretta verses the guy that uses a Lindsey palm graver verses the guy that uses a computer laser engraver.  Talent comes in all forms. 

 

Im currently cleaning up brackets for a power steering unit on a framed off 1951 Chevy sedan delivery. I’m using a combination of Dremel, dewalt and a bunch of hand tools.  Then I intend to then use a Lindsey palm graver to put some designs on the brackets.  I’m not a professional. And the f cares. It’s my sh$t. Please stop all the insults. 

 

Talents come in in all forms.  If you don’t like a tool. Cool. But constantly bashing it only makes you small in the eyes of those who happen to be talented it its use

Edited by Tennessee Trapper Tom
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To the point.  I’m an ex M1A2 mechanic retired military. I’m not a gunsmith. I’m smart enough not to do anything on my firearms. Foredoms or Dremel or hand tools. I’m going to take them to a trained gunsmith. 

 

Its not so much the tools as it is the USER of the tool.

 

granted there are tools I won’t buy, but it’s because of quality and durability.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TTT I'm sorry if I offended you. This was meant as a joke. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lefty Wheeler

 

You did not offend me at all.  I just felt I needed to make my point more clear. I have nothing against those who prefer certain tools. I myself have taken a gunsmithing course, still have my materials but didnt complete it. I determined that I only wanted to work on my firearms, which I do. If I F it up. My problem. We all have an opinion. 

 

I found over over the last 45 years of taking mechanic courses that the tool mattered less than the talent of the individual. I got into carving and woodwork because of a Dremel tool. It was an affordable tool. That led to metal work. Etc etc. if I had had to buy a foredoms from the beginning like everyone told me to do. I would not have gone down the Hobby path I did that has brought me and recipients of my gifts such joy. 

 

 

Edited by Tennessee Trapper Tom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lefty Wheeler, I apologize for highjacking your thread.  I loved your post.  I guess I’m just a real TOOL!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are a lot of craftsmen who rely on Dremel tools. I've put plenty of mileage on the one I own and even had to rebuild it once. The running joke however is that a lot of people who shouldn't even be allowed near a screwdriver tend to buy Dremels and suddenly think they can do anything with them... including a lot of jobs that should be left to a professional.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A32A012A-AF9F-4B72-8FE6-E2C7F615C50B.jpeg
 

Love the motto: “A Gentleman Does Not Motor About After Dark” John Lucas 1834-1903

 

Seamus

Edited by Seamus McGillicuddy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Tennessee Trapper Tom said:

To the point.  I’m an ex M1A2 mechanic retired military. I’m not a gunsmith. I’m smart enough not to do anything on my firearms. Foredoms or Dremel or hand tools. I’m going to take them to a trained gunsmith. 

 

Its not so much the tools as it is the USER of the tool.

 

granted there are tools I won’t buy, but it’s because of quality and durability.

Their (mis)use on firearms by kitchen table gunsmiths is why the President of Dremel should get a Christmas card from every gunsmith in America every year.

 

Personally, I have learned to ban Dremels and guns from being in the same room.  It's a LOT less costly that way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Smuteye John SASS#24774 said:

Their (mis)use on firearms by kitchen table gunsmiths is why the President of Dremel should get a Christmas card from every gunsmith in America every year.

 

Personally, I have learned to ban Dremels and guns from being in the same room.  It's a LOT less costly that way.

Again I will repeat myself. It’s not the tool it’s the user.  If that same person used a Foredom the result would be the same. In the case it’s a lot more costly, because now they spent more on a tool, still f’d up and you get the firearm to fix. I’d say that these guys keep you in business lol. No offense intended. You are always going to get those people. Some of us out here occasionally mess up, and that’s on us. Stop blaming the tool we use, blame the TOOL we can be lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/27/2021 at 10:33 AM, Lefty Wheeler said:

Tools Explained - : DRILL PRESS:

A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.
 
WIRE WHEEL:
Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, "Oh, s—“
 
SKILL SAW:
A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.
 
PLIERS:
Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.
 
BELT SANDER:
An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.
 
HACKSAW:
One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle ... It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.
 
VISE-GRIPS:
Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.
 
OXYACETYLENE TORCH:
Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you want to remove a bearing race.
 
TABLE SAW:
A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.
 
HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK:
Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.
 
BAND SAW:
A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge.
 
TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST:
A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to disconnect.
 
PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER:
Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.
 
STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER:
A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms.
 
PRY BAR:
A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.
 
HOSE CUTTER:
A tool used to make hoses too short.
 
HAMMER:
Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent to the object we are trying to hit usually smashing the thumb that is holding the object that you are trying to pound into whatever it is that you are working on effectively eliminating the need for manicure care on that thumbnail for weeks. 
 
UTILITY KNIFE:
Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use
 

seems we have had similar experiences , i can relate to a lot of those much to my chagrin 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's never the tool.  It's the wrench that's using the tool...  I know this from personal experience.  Don't ask me about my shortened pinkie finger after the run in with a table saw....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Tennessee Trapper Tom said:

Again I will repeat myself. It’s not the tool it’s the user.  If that same person used a Foredom the result would be the same. In the case it’s a lot more costly, because now they spent more on a tool, still f’d up and you get the firearm to fix. I’d say that these guys keep you in business lol. No offense intended. You are always going to get those people. Some of us out here occasionally mess up, and that’s on us. Stop blaming the tool we use, blame the TOOL we can be lol

 

We're not disagreeing with you. The same idiots who should have their Dremels taken away also need to have their files and hammers locked up. They're the reason why gun manuals always state that any disassembly beyond the normal field-strip stage or attempting to fix a problem yourself will void the warranty.

 

I once knew an old woman who was always trying to fix things around her home, even though she clearly didn't have the IQ to change a light bulb. She would always bring hot messes to the hardware store where I worked and ask me how to fix them. She refused to pay anyone to do the work for her because she was a tightwad. When a year went by without seeing her I joked to my co-workers that she must have finally electrocuted herself or blown herself up.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In short,

tools, implements made by guys for guys for the destruction of perfectly good working items.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, I just remembered, all three of my MGAs had a screw jacks and the handles doubled as starting cranks.  Little hole under the radiator grill had a socket for the shaft to fit in.  I used it once to see if it worked.  After about three tries my buddy suggested I turn on the ignition and you know what?  It fired right up. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just wish that those expensive tools that I’ve made my living with for so long would quit growing legs!!

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.