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I wonder about those Australians!


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WB - anyone you know?

 

https://news.yahoo.com/police-rescue-spooked-nude-sunbathers-062413134.html

 

SYDNEY (AP) — Police have fined two men who had to be rescued from an Australian forest after they were startled by a deer while nude sunbathing on a beach and became lost.

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Have you never MET an Australian?!?! Meet a couple and you don't wonder anymore!:lol:

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 .... ahem, ....... 'TWAS NOT I .....  nor me neither .....

 

I heard they were "backpacker" tourists. and only a few places where they could be "startled" by deer.

 

Deer are not native to Australia and have been introduced and then gone feral ...... in some places.

 

:mellow:

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3 minutes ago, Wallaby Jack, SASS #44062 said:

 

Deer are not native to Australia and have been introduced and then gone feral ...... in some places.

 

:mellow:

I will bet not near the big rock!

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4 minutes ago, Texas Lizard said:

I guess you did not get lost????

 

Texas Lizard

Knocked it on a tree and didn't get far. Curled up in the fetal position. 

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8 hours ago, Michigan Slim said:

Have you never MET an Australian?!?! Meet a couple and you don't wonder anymore!:lol:

 

One of my dad's best friends from WWII married an Australian.   Very elegant and gracious Lady, she was. 

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Nineteen eighty seven - on a 747 from Hawaii to San Francisco.  Most of the passengers were Aussies.  And a most rowdy bunch they were!

 

Finally, about 40 minutes after takeoff, the captain came on the PA system and literally yelled "If you Australians don't sit down and knock it off I'm gonna turn this bird around and head back to Honolulu and you'll have to find a BOAT to the mainland!"

 

:lol:

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to be fair they are Rusa deer they are big  and scary, would have been at burning palms nude beach area

 

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8 hours ago, Wallaby Jack, SASS #44062 said:

 .......... ummmmmm , were you on that flight too ?  :blush:

 

I was indeed.  :)

 

It was a late-night flight, and the Future Former Missus Hardpan and I were returning from an "all expenses paid" trip to Maui that I'd won on a radio contest.  (Sometimes real people actually DO win those things! ^_^ )

 

They were a fun bunch, to be sure, and the drinking and hollering and singing was somewhat bearable, although sleep was impossible.  But when the entire congregation of 'em started stomping on the deck - like fans at a sporting event - the entire plane shook.  And this was a 747!

 

That did it... the skipper was downright pi$$ed.  

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24 minutes ago, Larsen E. Pettifogger, SASS #32933 said:

I wonder about those Australians!

 

What do you expect?  If you were down under hanging upside down all the time the blood would rush to your head too.

But at least we don't wear kilts !!:o

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2 hours ago, Painted Mohawk SASS 77785 said:

But at least we don't wear kilts !!:o

 

AHEM

 

What do you call this????????

 

 

Battalion members wear wool well

 

Wool was a highlight of Anzac Day ceremonies last week, and wearing it best was the 16th Battalion, Royal WA Regiment.

 

Dressed in traditional kilts, Bravo Company, led by sergeant major Warrant Officer Class Two Joe Cicala, upheld WA's early Scottish heritage as it paraded down St George's Terrace, just as the company did in 1938, during the first official parade of the kilted battalion.

WO2 Cicala said one difference to those early days was that new recruits must finance their own uniforms.

"Notwithstanding, they inspire to uphold traditional ceremonial Scottish dress and are extremely proud to do so," he said.

WA authors John Treloar and Peter Shaw, who wrote The Kilted Battalion: The History of the 16th Infantry Battalion, gathered findings from war diary extracts on the introduction of Scottish traditional highland dress into the Australian militia.

Footnotes in the 2006 book found that from its inception in 1936, 16th Battalion - The Cameron Highlanders of WA - wore a tartan originally adopted in 1794 by the newly raised 79th Regiment in Scotland, which later became the Queen's own Cameron Highlanders.

The Cameron tartan kilt cloth was then made of fine crossbred 18-ounce serge, supplied by WA Worsted and Woollen Mills of Albany.

Unfortunately, war brought an abrupt end to many WA public ceremonies and the kilts were put into storage until after World War II.

The 1960s brought about the modernisation of the Australian Army, although with renewed interest in the preservation of history, and the 16th Battalion Cameron Highlander of WA Association was formed. Today, B Company, 16RWAR recruits are keen to don Scottish dress, honouring the past soldiers who served before them.

Lance Corporal Justin Martin, whose family farmed in Kalannie, said the kilt represented important militia history and tradition.

"We take great pride in wearing Scottish dress," he said, after participating in the Anzac Day parade.

"My grandparents, Graham and Jean Martin, cleared their farmland to run big Collinsville-type woolly sheep, which continued with my parents Russell and Roslyn, giving me more reason to respect the cloth of my heritage."

Mr Martin, who is an Armadale fireman, said one of the great benefits of wearing woollen clothing was that it was a fire retardant.

While the Scottish dress of B Company, 16RWAR has survived the test of time, unfortunately WA's woollen mills have not.

The kilts must now be ordered from Scotland. Nevertheless, we may still remember a time when WA wool was worn by those who proudly served their country.

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I want to meet the man who when "open" to the elements does not run away from a lot of sharp pointy things on legs heading his way:blink:

 

Besides it was very bushy there and I lost my bearings for a while, OK!

 

At least at the moment all I need to worry about is some camels and a jackal. Mind you that sand finds its way into the darndest places:rolleyes:

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8 hours ago, Sedalia Dave said:

 

AHEM

 

What do you call this????????

 

 

Battalion members wear wool well

 

Wool was a highlight of Anzac Day ceremonies last week, and wearing it best was the 16th Battalion, Royal WA Regiment.

 

Dressed in traditional kilts, Bravo Company, led by sergeant major Warrant Officer Class Two Joe Cicala, upheld WA's early Scottish heritage as it paraded down St George's Terrace, just as the company did in 1938, during the first official parade of the kilted battalion.

WO2 Cicala said one difference to those early days was that new recruits must finance their own uniforms.

"Notwithstanding, they inspire to uphold traditional ceremonial Scottish dress and are extremely proud to do so," he said.

WA authors John Treloar and Peter Shaw, who wrote The Kilted Battalion: The History of the 16th Infantry Battalion, gathered findings from war diary extracts on the introduction of Scottish traditional highland dress into the Australian militia.

Footnotes in the 2006 book found that from its inception in 1936, 16th Battalion - The Cameron Highlanders of WA - wore a tartan originally adopted in 1794 by the newly raised 79th Regiment in Scotland, which later became the Queen's own Cameron Highlanders.

The Cameron tartan kilt cloth was then made of fine crossbred 18-ounce serge, supplied by WA Worsted and Woollen Mills of Albany.

Unfortunately, war brought an abrupt end to many WA public ceremonies and the kilts were put into storage until after World War II.

The 1960s brought about the modernisation of the Australian Army, although with renewed interest in the preservation of history, and the 16th Battalion Cameron Highlander of WA Association was formed. Today, B Company, 16RWAR recruits are keen to don Scottish dress, honouring the past soldiers who served before them.

Lance Corporal Justin Martin, whose family farmed in Kalannie, said the kilt represented important militia history and tradition.

"We take great pride in wearing Scottish dress," he said, after participating in the Anzac Day parade.

"My grandparents, Graham and Jean Martin, cleared their farmland to run big Collinsville-type woolly sheep, which continued with my parents Russell and Roslyn, giving me more reason to respect the cloth of my heritage."

Mr Martin, who is an Armadale fireman, said one of the great benefits of wearing woollen clothing was that it was a fire retardant.

While the Scottish dress of B Company, 16RWAR has survived the test of time, unfortunately WA's woollen mills have not.

The kilts must now be ordered from Scotland. Nevertheless, we may still remember a time when WA wool was worn by those who proudly served their country.

I hate a smart ass ..:D

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