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The writing in that magazine is precious.  They even have FDR holding a rifle with a statement of being a gun collector.  I’ll keep reading. Good post.

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Posted (edited)

Yeah, it is a good post.  I am learning how to hunt squirrels with a .22 without actually hitting them! :blink:

 

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Edited by Dutch Wheeler
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2 hours ago, Dutch Wheeler said:

Yeah, it is a good post.  I am learning how to hunt squirrels with a .22 without actually hitting them! :blink:

 

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My dad told me about barking squirrels.  Never did it though. 

 

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Those old magazine articles bring back a lot of memories.  Back when I started shooting BP around the time of the Civil War Centennial it was cheaper to buy originals than reproductions.  In fact there were very few reproductions.  I remember buying an original unissued .58 Enfield to shoot.  I also had one of those huge, heavy muzzling loading bench rest guns.  Weighed 20 pounds and took about ten minutes per shot to load.  The first reproduction I got was this one.  It is a very early G U marked gun.  This was a Gregorelli & Uberti which came before the Uberti we have these days.  It is date marked 1960 and serial number 51.  For those familiar with Navy Arms the Bogota address is very scarce.  It was a .36 and built on a proper size .36 frame.  Hope this wasn't to boring.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Ramblin Gambler said:

 

My dad told me about barking squirrels.  Never did it though. 

 

 

I'm still trying to truly figure out the effectiveness of this technique. :blink:

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Okay, I Googled it.  I think I got it now, and actually understand why that technique started.

 

If you were hunting in the woods during the 19th century, you likely carried a muzzleloader rifle that used round ball bullets. It was a suitable weapon that worked for most big game--squirrels were a different story. Shooting a squirrel with a projectile from a muzzleloader would turn the small animal into a pile of mush.  So, they had to come up with a way of hunting squirrels without shooting them directly.  Alas, "Barking a Squirrel" was born!

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3 hours ago, Larsen E. Pettifogger, SASS #32933 said:

Those old magazine articles bring back a lot of memories.  Back when I started shooting BP around the time of the Civil War Centennial it was cheaper to buy originals than reproductions.  In fact there were very few reproductions.  I remember buying an original unissued .58 Enfield to shoot.  I also had one of those huge, heavy muzzling loading bench rest guns.  Weighed 20 pounds and took about ten minutes per shot to load.  The first reproduction I got was this one.  It is a very early G U marked gun.  This was a Gregorelli & Uberti which came before the Uberti we have these days.  It is date marked 1960 and serial number 51.  For those familiar with Navy Arms the Bogota address is very scarce.  It was a .36 and built on a proper size .36 frame.  Hope this wasn't to boring.

 

 

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Sweeeeet!

 

Mike

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I remember hunting treerats with a .22.  No longer safe in my state of NC as there are fewer places that do not have a hoise or a neighborhood within range.  If i did so again, there are some very nifty pellet rifles now available.  I might even get to shot more than one before them squirrels went into hiding.

 

I remember around 1985 when Dixie Gunworks was selling several hundred original, never issued Rogers and Spencers revolvers that had been found in a NYC warehouse.  I seem to remember a price of $127.50.

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