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I picked up an older Navy Arms 1873 cheap and assumed (dumb idea) that I could get it worked on. I sent it out to my favorite Smith who called me and told me there wasn't anything he could do with it because the original links and lifter weren't in it ( someone tried to put a short stroke kit in it) and the parts haven't been available for quite a while. Its got the inch and a half lifter. Anyone know of anyone out there that might have old Navy Arms parts or have an idea. I bought the gun for a backup and for my daughter to use occasionally but if its a wall hanger it is.

Swan 

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Those are a bit of a nightmare to work on because of lack of parts.  I only know of one smith who worked up a similar vintage '66 as a personal project:

Joe Alves at Pioneer Gun Works.  You can give them a call and see if there is anything they can do for you.

http://www.pioneergunworks.com/

 

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Older 73's are different in many ways.  Without links, that have a smaller pin diameter than current models, that's the first step in determining what to do.  If someone drilled out the receiver to except the newer design, this is a big problem.  Since they are missing it may indicate something like this has happened.

First determine your receiver pins are smaller than current design, if they are you could think about getting replacement parts.

 

You may be better off selling it for parts.

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Finding parts for those old Navy Arms early production Uberti rifles is akin to a search for the Holy Grail.  The only source I know of for parts is "Somebody Else's Rifle."  The only way the rifle, as described, would be a bargain, is if they paid you to take it away ;)

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Just curious but what is my Stoeger 1873 Winchester with a Accokeek Md address on the bbl. It’s running fine but just wondering. Uberti I hope. 

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Anything with Stoeger on the barrel will be more modern (like, this century at least).  When Beretta bought Uberti, Uberti USA ceased to exist (and morphed into VTI gunparts), and "generic" Ubertis started being marked Stoeger instead of Uberti USA.

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what is my Stoeger 1873 Winchester with a Accokeek Md address on the bbl.

 

It's made by Uberti.  Close examination of the barrel will likely show the U in octagon company mark. 

 

Now, is it a long action or a short action Uberti?  Measure lifter length.   1.600" or very close to that - it's the latest modern length and should take most currently available parts.  Shorter, close to 1.500", and you have an old production piece.

 

If you translate the proof date code (two letters) on the barrel into a year of production, you will be more able to tell VTI or other parts suppliers exactly what you have, which is necessary especially for bolt replacement, firing pin extension replacement, or fixing a broken cartridge support tab.  Many tables of Uberti proof date code relationship to year exist on-line and in reference books.

 

good luck, GJ

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Posted (edited)

You are correct Joe, uberti it is with a 1.600 lifter. Thanks. 

Edited by Baltimore Ed
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They Make Beautiful Wall Hangers :D

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Years ago I bought an early Navy Arms '73 that had the short lifter. I didn't know about them at the time, but found out when I needed some parts. It was traded off for some forgotten thing.

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The definitive way to tell if your rifle has the early short carrier is to look for a notch in the breech face above the chamber. Notch= old.  No notch= "current" design.

 

Notch is about 3/32" deep, 7/16" wide and runs from barrel to top of receiver. Purpose of notch is to allow nose of unfired cartridges to clear the action when being extracted.  Loaded rounds needed the notch, such as when emptying the firearm by cycling the action without dropping the hammer.

 

Applies to early Henry and 1866 replicas.  Uberti changed design to what is currently available, lengthening receiver well and carrier enough to remove need for notch (and made 1866/Henry parts compatible with 1873 parts.)


Sometimes, pictures of top of receiver are not available.  Other clues for "old" design are lever safety and serial number less than ~40,000 for either Henry or 1866.  

 

Dates of change of carrier length may or may not coincide exactly with changes in toggle link pins or the dropping of the lever safety.  Regardless, if your rifle has the notch, it is old style.

No Notch Uberti.jpg

1866-notch.jpg

Uberti notch.jpg

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22 minutes ago, Palouse said:

The definitive way to tell if your rifle has the early short carrier is to look for a notch in the breech face above the chamber. Notch= old.  No notch= "current" design....

 

I could easily be wrong but I was under the impression that only the 44-40's were notched, and the .38's were not notched (shorter round so notch not needed).

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Just now, Abilene, SASS # 27489 said:

 

I could easily be wrong but I was under the impression that only the 44-40's were notched, and the .38's were not notched (shorter round so notch not needed).

I have 44/40 and .38 with notched receiver. 

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