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Stoeger Double Trigger vs Single Trigger


Col Del Rio

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I want to get a Stoeger coach gun for my wife. I have heard that the single triggers are harder to maintain than the double triggers.  Anyone have knowledge of this?

 

Also I am still debating 12 gauge vs 20 gauge. Lighter gun  that is easier to control verses lesser felt recoil.  Thoughts?

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The Stoeger is an entry level shotgun for Cowboy Action Shooting.

The supreme model with skeet chokes work well. (Stoegers use winchokes)

You will find that the loads for 12ga are lighter in recoil and are easier to load in the barrels than 20ga.

The double trigger guns are more reliable. Needless to say that you should cut the stock to fit and install the best sorbothane recoil pad you can find. I recommend Kickeez

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Okay, I have had both the 20 and 12 Gauge Stoegers. The 12 is a 20" Coach Gun the 20 was a 26". The 12 is a bit heavier and not bad for the recoil. The 20 was light and had greater felt recoil. Beautiful little gun, but it is no longer here while the 12 is still here and runs fine. Both were double trigger guns. +1 on a GOOD recoil pad for the newer shooter.

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I have (3) double trigger Stoegers in both 12 & 20 gauge. One of the 20 gauges is a youth model that I got for the wife who is of a smaller stature. Fits her well and isn't too heavy for her. I reload so my light shotgun loads for both 12 & 20 are not a recoil problem, and she has never had an issue with felt recoil out of her 20 ga. I prefer the double trigger myself.

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Get the 12 gauge, I've known experienced shooters who said a short barreled 20 gauge had a nasty kick to it.  Off the top of my head, there are at least 3 different factory light loads available in 12 gauge:  Winchester Feather Lite and Extra Lite and a Herter's load that was probably about the same as the Extra Lite.

 

And if you happen to forget to pack the shotgun ammo there will be plenty of shooters who will have extra 12 gauge for you to use.  I don't see very many people using a 20 gauge.

 

Get the double trigger, they are almost always more reliable than a single trigger, which is either an inertia reset, not always reliable with light loads or a more complicated (compared to a double trigger) mechanical reset.

 

And for a useless fact, the double trigger vs single trigger argument goes all the way back to well before 1900 in the high end British shotgun market and the double trigger was the preferred choice.

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As for 20 verses 12 gauge, I'd stick with the 12 gauge and shoot light loads.  If you load your own shot shells there are plenty of 7/8 oz loads to choose from and if you purchase only, there are the featherlites, (low noise, low recoil) etc. available if you can find them.  I really don't think that the length of the barrels makes a big difference in felt recoil and the difference in weight would probably be the only real factor with the heavier gun having less felt recoil.  However, it is very important that the gun fit properly and that it be held firmly against the shoulder or it will kick like a mule no matter what and a good recoil pad is highly recommended for anyone that is recoil sensitive.  

 

As for double verses single triggers, there have been some issues (double fire and no second barrel fire, etc.)  with certain single trigger guns and there are different types of single triggers.  Not sure which type Stoeger uses, but being a low end gun, I'd be careful.  Some single trigger guns require enough recoil to reset the trigger and this can be a real issue when your trying to manage recoil.  I personally prefer a double trigger gun, but that is a personal choice as that's what I grew up with, however, I do think that there is also a reliability advantage to the independent, mechanical triggers and reliability is important in this game.  I tried a really nice single trigger, Fox Shotgun, for a full season and had no mechanical trigger issues, but ended up going back to the double trigger gun, because I frequently found myself pulling on the trigger guard for the second shot.  This was entirely my fault, due to my shooting double trigger guns since I was a kid, but if one is just learning to shoot a SXS shotgun, they shouldn't have this issue with a single trigger.  Frankly, it's all about what one gets used to and that is an important factor in this game.

 

All in all, I'd stick with the tried and true 12 gauge, double trigger gun, make sure it fits her properly, has a quality recoil pad, and that she gives it a good hold and a stiff shoulder!  Satisfy those requirements and I'd bet she can handle just about any 12 gauge load short of 3" magnums.  Good luck and good shooting to all.  

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27 minutes ago, Ezra Hawthorne said:

How does a 12 gauge have lower felt recoil than a 20 gauge if the former is a larger size? Kinda seems like it would be the opposite way.

Physics says the same weight and velocity of shot will produce the same recoil. The 20 having a smaller diameter barrel will produce higher pressure. The 20s are generally built on smaller frame guns, so not as much mass to slow down the recoil impulse. I was really surprised at the "felt" recoil difference between two shotguns from the same maker. The 20 had a much more noticeable "jab" as opposed to more of a "push" from the 12.

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11 hours ago, Sawhorse Kid said:

Don't know 1st hand, But I hear the single trigger has some reliability issues with the the right barrel misfiring. 

I believe from talking with those (usually men) and seeing those who have had this issue from single triggers is from NOT pulling into the shoulder firm enough.

Men will also seem to have a single trigger 'double' on them from the same issue.

I used a 12ga, single trigger Stoger for 10 years. No issues untill last WR...where Boogie and Coyote Cap found a tiny nib of wood that was causing timing issue.

Works great now.

I treated myself to a CD single trigger.

No issues.

Curious to what extra maintainance you were told would be needed?

Agree with Deacon, lighter gun, more recoil!

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1 hour ago, Gunner Gatlin, SASS 10274L said:

If shooting BP - go double trigger.

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

Why?

I have shot Goex, 777 and APP along with Shockey's Gold with my single trigger.

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I've been running a Stoeger single trigger for two years and have a ton of shells though it (1,000 or more?). I have not had one issue with this gun and I have never "doubled" with this gun. I did hone the chambers, installed a larger bead, and cut the lever spring and I must say, it's fast, balanced and shucks Winchester AA and Remington STS shells with ease.

 

BTW, the Stoeger is does not have inertia set trigger.

 

Fore the money, it's hard to beat.

 

KCM

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1 hour ago, Singin' Sue 71615 said:

Why?

I have shot Goex, 777 and APP along with Shockey's Gold with my single trigger.

AFAIK, the black powder era only had double triggers in the American market.  It's a visual "thing"! :D

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1 hour ago, Singin' Sue 71615 said:

Why?

I have shot Goex, 777 and APP along with Shockey's Gold with my single trigger.

 

Smokeless recoil seems to activate the single trigger reset better than real BP recoil. YMMV.

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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3 hours ago, Singin' Sue 71615 said:

Why?

I have shot Goex, 777 and APP along with Shockey's Gold with my single trigger.

Because pulling both triggers at once with BP or subs is FUN!!!  I do it with my 10 g with 120 grs of 1 F and 1 1/2 ounce of shot.  :D

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43 minutes ago, Chantry said:

Because pulling both triggers at once with BP or subs is FUN!!!  I do it with my 10 g with 120 grs of 1 F and 1 1/2 ounce of shot.  :D

 

And seeing the R.O. jump when you touch off both barrels!

:lol:

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"I want to get a Stoeger coach gun for my wife." 

 

Is this an even trade?

 

Ok, I'll be serious. My wife uses an Stoeger 12ga. ( double trigger) with low recoil loads. The butt stock was cut down to fit her and she does not have any problems as long as she keeps it tight to the shoulder. 

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35 minutes ago, McCandless said:

 

And seeing the R.O. jump when you touch off both barrels!

:lol:

It does tend to get everyone's attention,  even though I'm several hundred yards away and out of sight people know it's me when I fire it.  Short of an 8 gauge nothing else booms like a short barreled 10 gauge.  :D:lol:

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:) Col. Del Rio,

 

A 20Ga Stoeger or most any 20Ga is built on a smaller, lighter frame than a 12 and is therefore lighter.  Simple physics provide the lighter gun will have more "felt" recoil based on weight.

 

The "big" deal.  For decades, the 20Ga shotgunners begged the ammunition manufacturers to provide ammunition to give the 20Ga the same performance as a 12.  The manufacturers said:  OK!!  It's your shoulder.  Ergo, most available 20Ga ammunition will recoil harder than 12Ga.  There is very little commercially loaded 20Ga that is actually "light".  The only one that comes to mind are Fiocchi Trainer 20Ga.  Pussy Cat loading but effective.  Tames the 20Ga nicely.  A 12Ga, is heavier, and Lo Noise Lo Recoil ammunition provides a very manageable recoil.

 

Just for the record -  "Light Target" from anybody is NOT LIGHT.  It is intended to reliably break clay birds out to 40 yards.  that ammunition is as stout, if not some stouter then most "Field" loads.  FYI

 

Think of a double trigger side by side as TWO single barrel guns joined at the hip.  If one side fails, you still have a working single shot on the other side.  If a single trigger gun fails, you're done.

 

Regardless of which style you select . . . . it is imperative you have the Butt Stock cut to fit the person.  An ill fitting shotgun can be brutal.  Also have a nice recoil pad installed and change the angle at the toe to negative 5 degrees. 

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19 hours ago, Ace_of_Hearts said:

The Stoeger is an entry level shotgun for Cowboy Action Shooting.

I'm still trying to get over this comment...

 

:wacko:

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Kaya runs her 20 really well. Reloads with Unique powder are pussycats. She uses a Stoeger coach. It's a light, handy gun. 

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I buy the bulk packs from walmart for about $20+/100 when they are in stock for trap and skeet (I don't know if they are always lead or not, check before taking to a match), I can shoot those all day.  I've never borrowed anyone's 12 gauge with store bought ammo that I was willing to run more than 1 game of trap or skeet.  if you're reloading your own shells, you can match the recoil to what you want it to be.  get the weight of gun that manipulates best and fits best for your wife.  12 gauge guns are lighter and easier to manipulate, if loaded properly, recoil shouldn't be an issue.

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14 hours ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

I'm still trying to get over this comment...

 

:wacko:

 

I can afford a SKB, Browning, Fox, or Charles Dailey but I shoot a Stoeger Supreme.  I sold my Fox and Charles Dailey and still shoot my Stoeger.

 

I prefer a shotgun with a double trigger and I have yet to find a SKB or Browning with other than a single.  My Fox and CD both had double triggers, but I still prefer the Stoeger.

 

While some folks look down on Stoegers, some of us shoot them as our preferred shotgun.  I can purchase two to three Stoegers for what one would pay for a SKB or CD.  MGW sells replacement stocks for those that might need to cut a stock down.  If I have one that starts having issues during a match, I always have two or three backups in the truck.  I also bring for these for those that might need a loaner as their shotguns have started having issues.

 

The Supremes allow you to choose the chokes so you can experiment.

 

I have installed mercury recoil suppressors in my stocks as sometimes the stock does not actually touch my shoulder when moving to shoot the next target.

 

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Heck .. even Bruce uses a Stoeger in Army of Darkness ... (even though he calls it a Remington in the movie) ... 

(you just knew this was going to get posted didn't you??)

 

 

 

 

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17 hours ago, Michigan Slim said:

Kaya runs her 20 really well. Reloads with Unique powder are pussycats. She uses a Stoeger coach. It's a light, handy gun. 

What is your recipe for those loads? Thanks!

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4 hours ago, Patagonia Pete said:

Heck .. even Bruce uses a Stoeger in Army of Darkness ... (even though he calls it a Remington in the movie) ... 

(you just knew this was going to get posted didn't you??)

 

 

 

 

 "Made in Grand Rapids Michigan.."  :lol::lol::lol:

 

Fantastic.

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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1 hour ago, DeaconKC said:

What is your recipe for those loads? Thanks!

Remington STS hulls, 7/8 ounce shot, Win WAA20 wads (or Claybuster eq.) and Unique powder with a  MEC #18 bushing. About 12 grains if I remember correctly.

AA hulls work too but I drop to 3/4 ounce shot for a better crimp.

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2 hours ago, Michigan Slim said:

Remington STS hulls, 7/8 ounce shot, Win WAA20 wads (or Claybuster eq.) and Unique powder with a  MEC #18 bushing. About 12 grains if I remember correctly.

AA hulls work too but I drop to 3/4 ounce shot for a better crimp.

Thank you Sir!

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53 minutes ago, DeaconKC said:

Thank you Sir!

Any time. Kaya reminded me she stepped up to a #20 bushing. She has been shooting these loads since she was 12.

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