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Howdy Folks,

Im needing a little advice on a Winchester 1897. These things hardly ever show up locally here for sale. Well low and behold my dealer had one come in on consignment yesterday from an estate sale in my town. It’s a 30” full choke takedown that’s in pretty good shape. The stocks are sound and blueing is just about gone giving it a good used good patina. Locks up tight and can’t find any wobble anywhere. Has some pitting on the outside barrel but the bore is mirror smooth. By the numbers it’s a 1908 with the E stamp. They are askin 650.00 for it out the door. Too high? Anything else that I need to look over on one for defects? I’ve never owned one but it’s exactly like the one my granddaddy had years ago. I appreciate it y’all.

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Thanks Rainmaker. That’s kinda how I’m leaning but it sure is hard to lay that cash on the table. HeHe.

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If you can't lay $650 on the table, lay down about $500 - $525 and let him know you are serious about it but

$650 is stretching your budget a little too far.   Let him counter offer.

 

..........Widder

 

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Posted (edited)

Well.... I pulled the trigger on it. Went up there and put 550 on the table and walked out with it. :D Went to walk out and the feller handed me an old leather gun case and said it goes with it. Can’t beat that!

Edited by TNtrapper
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YEEHAW.    Sounds like ya done good, especially if seller and buyer are hap, hap, hap, hap, HAPPY!

:D

 

..........Widder

 

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I just finished cleaning up a nice one my  dad gave me. Manufacturing date is 1905.  I had planned on using it for CAS but it’s a 16 gauge and finding ammo was just not going to happen any time in the near future.  I’m just getting started but I’ll bring it out someday and put it through it’s paces.

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David Cardin...make sure you have the chamber length checked before you use that 16 gauge. Some of the early 97's in 12 gauge and as I understand it...all of the 16 gauges were short chambers. A good gunsmith can fix that problem

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8 hours ago, Old Man Graybeard said:

David Cardin...make sure you have the chamber length checked before you use that 16 gauge. Some of the early 97's in 12 gauge and as I understand it...all of the 16 gauges were short chambers. A good gunsmith can fix that problem

Thanks Graybeard.  I'm pretty sure it takes 2 1/2 inch shells which limits supply even further.  Fortunately, I was able to fine a 12 gauge CZ Sharptail that will be my main match shotgun.  I will be keeping my eyes open for availability of some appropriate ammo as supplies improve.

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Essentially all 1897 are marked for 2 3/4 inch shells.  BUT that is using the old roll-crimp shells with a slightly shorter hull.  The standard forcing cone is 1/2 (the taper beyond the chamber" so that will allow the modern 2 3/4 shells to be used.  That does very slightly raise the pressure and many report they have more felt recoil.  The Brits have done a lot of research into this and say that it is safe. 

But if it is a standard barrel thickness, you can readily have the chamber slightly lengthened as well as the throat lengthen to 1 1//2 inches to further reduce felt recoil.  In some small number of cases, the barrels were lighter and thinner so that would be a concern.

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4 hours ago, Marauder SASS #13056 said:

Essentially all 1897 are marked for 2 3/4 inch shells.  BUT that is using the old roll-crimp shells with a slightly shorter hull.  The standard forcing cone is 1/2 (the taper beyond the chamber" so that will allow the modern 2 3/4 shells to be used.  That does very slightly raise the pressure and many report they have more felt recoil.  The Brits have done a lot of research into this and say that it is safe. 

But if it is a standard barrel thickness, you can readily have the chamber slightly lengthened as well as the throat lengthen to 1 1//2 inches to further reduce felt recoil.  In some small number of cases, the barrels were lighter and thinner so that would be a concern.

 

THIS!!!

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