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When using stones, do you push the knife blade across the stone or draw it (pull it)?

Edited by Chief Rick
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Push with an arcing sweep. 20 degree angle for pocket knives, 15 for kitchen knives. 
 

I switched to the Lansky system and I don’t bother with stones now except for really big knives. 

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I've always pushed but I saw some videos of drawing the knife across the stone.  I've looked at some of the Lansky systems, from very inexpensive to very expensive.  Not sure what the difference is between the different "kits".  Haven't looked that closely.

 

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The Lansky system has two different grinding devices. One is regular grinding stones and the second and more expensive are diamond.

I have always pulled my knives over a stone.

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I stroke in a slicing motion but I used to have those some of those fine carborundum stones that were giveaways for advertising  and thats all we used then.  They were so small the safest method was a circular motion.  My Daddy could get a pocket knife razor sharp with one....somehow Ive gotten away from that with all the fancy doo dad sharpeners.  One thing he did do though was lay the blade down and just lift the spine to get a 10-15 degree angle.  Then he'd strop it on his boot.   Scary sharp.

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3 minutes ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

Push, because I learned how to do it in Boy Scouts and that's how they require it :)

Yep, I learned that in Scouts too.

 

 

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Push.  Imagine trying to slice off a bit of the stone.

 

Most folks overdo it.  If the blade geometry is good to begin with,  3 strokes on each side should be enough.  Quit when you can feel a “burr” on the edge opposite the stone.  Then use a smooth steel or leather strop to center the burr and make it the cutting edge.

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I've seen it done both ways,bit I personally pull the blade edge first,as if you are trying to cut the top of the stone.

After a 55+ year career as a butcher I've gotten lazy and use a 1in. by 30in.belt sander.

Belts are available in coarse to extra fine so you can get as fine an edge as you want.Just takes a little practice.

Of course,YMMV

Choctaw

 

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17 hours ago, Chief Rick said:

I've always pushed but I saw some videos of drawing the knife across the stone.  I've looked at some of the Lansky systems, from very inexpensive to very expensive.  Not sure what the difference is between the different "kits".  Haven't looked that closely.

 

Lansky can get expensive quick.

 

Their 3 stone basic kit, with the addition of a extra fine ceramic and a coarse serrated (serrations are like saws, why would you want a fine edge on a saw?), covers the majoriy of sharpening needs.  No need to get carried away.

.

A coarse diamond hone would be my preferred coarse stone since it would be handy for rebuilding an edge or fixing a nick, but that's just a personal preference.

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