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  My Dad gave me his little Winchester 22 cal bolt action rifle when I was just knee high to a short duck . I was only 5 yo but he was headed to a TB Hospital and wanted to make sure I ended up with it , just in case things went bad . Took a long time and the loss of part of both lungs but he made it out all right and that was the gun he taught me to shoot with . Happy ending to a not so happy start .

 We were visiting my Grandpa in Tennessee one summer when I was about 10 and my Grandpa said he had something he wanted to give me if I wanted it . He handed me his Long Tom 12 ga shotgun . I gotta tell ya , I got about 3 inches taller right there on the spot . Single barrel 36 inches long with exposed hammer . Kicked like ............... well you know.

 Both guns have now been passed on to my Grandkids now along with the memories that went with them. So I guess the question is , What got passed down to you , and does it have a home when your done with it ?

 

           Cider

 

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I have several that were passed to me. I have my great grandfather’s Model 92 in 38-40 and I actually shot a match and a deer with it. My father left me the Luger he brought back from WWII just to be a smart ass I qualified with it as a police officer for off duty carry.

 I also have a Colt Cobra left to me by an old close friend and mentor 

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I raided my grandfathers junk closet and got out with my grandmother's gun marked .410-44 brass and an unknown owner Springfield(lock plate says 1836).I learned to shoot somewhat with the muzzle loaded Springfield.  Kentucky windage became a reality because the barrel had been used for a prybar and it had a rather distinct bend.  My favorite load for it was a package of brass coated BBs over a palm full of powder.  I loaded the BBs still in their plastic envelope therefore needed no wadding.  If I could get a rabbit squirrel or black bird in the middle of the pattern I vaporized them

My major kill was a chicken hawk at about 20 yards.  I was out of BBs so I wadded up a bunch of flashing from a lead pouring episode, mashed it down on the power with a big marble then a piece of newspaper to hold it all in. He was sitting on a limb and I had enough time to hold way off to the right before I pulled the trigger.  He did not flinch, wiggle or draw another breath (DRT).Hawk killing was a highly praised occupation. Ya see there was sparrow hawks (kestrals), duck hawks, (Perigrines, sharp shins) chicken hawks (red tails and red shoulders)  and them big ones were iggles.

That would have been 1948 or so.

 

 

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I got my dad's Win Model 12 in 16 gauge, which in turn I gave to my oldest son. I have my dad's 12 ga. Browing semi-auto, and his Model 12 S&W .38 spl.

 

My brothers have other guns of his, and one has our granddad's Stirlingworth 12 ga double.

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I didn’t get any of my dad’s guns.  They went to my little brother and I’m good with that. I got several of his tools from the welding shop and a few hand tools that will pass on down.

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My dad gave me his Mossberg Model 146B-A .22 bolt action rifle for my sixth birthday.  I had taken my first squirrel with that rifle while I was sitting in his lap the previous fall.  It's still my favorite squirrel gun.

 

A few Christmases ago, he gave my wife his Savage 1903 .22 pump action takedown rifle that he had restored.  She had fallen it love with it when he loaned it to her for a .22 shooting event.  That had been my favorite rabbit gun when I was a kid.  I love the balance of the rifle.  It swings naturally to follow a moving rabbit. 

 

I remember when he got that rifle.  It was a rusted up mess that a farmer friend had found in the rafters of an old wooden corn crib. It was likely a long forgotten seed gun that the farmer's father had kept in the crib for ratting.  (This was the same farmer that owned the 20 acres of walnut trees that were surrounded on threes sides by corn fields were we hunted big fat fox squirrels.)  He didn't want it so he gave it to dad.  After months of oil baths and repetitive cleanings, he was finally able to disassemble it.  After lots of additional cleaning and prep, he was able to re-blued it and reassemble it with the refinished stock and forearm.  It's not a collector's piece, but I sure do love it.

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I got an 1840's vintage Kentucky rifle after my grandfather died. My aunt took my cousin and I to a closet in her house and told us to pick a gun.  There was an 1860 Springfield in there but to a 13 year old, the Kentucky rifle looked "cooler". I shot that rifle many times way back then. No recoil and weaker than a 22.but it was very accurate. A good squirrel gun.

 

It does not hold much sentimental value as my grandfather was kind of a junk dealer and no one knew where he got it or the other guns.

 

My dad had only two guns, a 22 Marlin single shot bolt action and a 12 gauge pump. I wanted the Marlin after he passed but the (evil) stepmother would not give it to me. I eventually bought one on GB to kind of reminisce about all of the fun I had with it when I was a kid. 

Edited by Injun Ryder, SASS #36201L
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My cousin finally got our grandfathers Colt to me...It was a few years, but it is mine now....He said you have the badge and handcuffs...May as well have the colt too...Always thought it was 45 colt...It turns out to be 44-40 Colt storekeeper model...Hammer spring still very strong...Our grandfather was a deputy sheriff...That was sometime around 1910 or later in Harris County, Texas....

 

Texas Lizard

   

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When my Pa died I received his 12 gauge 870 that I had bought him for Christmas many years before. I traded my brother that gun for his Model 700 .270 so my boy could have a deer rifle for his first hunt at Grandpas cabin. My other brother got dads .30-30 Model 94. That ended up with me because his wife didn't want guns in the house........ 

I also have my great grandpas Model 99 in .38-55 and my grandpas Stevens Crackshot .22. His first gun. My kids have been told the history of these and I will write it down when my time nears. All treasures.

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I got my dad's Remington Model 8 in  .35 Remington and his Stevens 520 shotgun in 12 gauge.  He bought them from a man named Arch Simms in 1941 in Payette, Idaho, and I "bought" them from Dad in 1961 for a golf set of seven irons and three woods in a bag that I had won in a raffle at the local Lions Club.

 

I had both guns professionally restored about two years ago.

 

 

They, along with several other guns, will be passed to my son and daughter and my grandson.

Edited by Forty Rod SASS 3935
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ive passed all of the important family items to my kids , grandkids , nieces and nephews at this point , the few i have left are not significant - my cowboy guns i still use - i decided a long time ago that id not keep the heirlooms till i was dead , i wanted to "see" them enjoy them and understand why they are important , there's a couple my wife can do with as she pleases and my cowboy guns they can disperse as they see fit when im gone , 

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I got a Astra Cub in .22 short from my father-in-law when he passed and my daughter got a .22 single action and a Winchester model 62a slidec action.

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Sad story about my Grandfather's old shotgun. Double barreled hammer shotgun, it was passed down to my uncle. When he passed away, his son, my cousin got it. I begged him for it. He moved from Ohio to California and somehow HIS son got it and....GULP.....pawned it for drug money! I can't come up with enough bad words to describe how I feel about that!:angry:

Edited by Rye Miles #13621
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I got my dad's Marlin 336 in .35 Remington.  That has a spot of rust on it because he died after his last elk hunt with it in Washington and he did not clean and oil it.  I may get it re-blued...someday.Also got a .22 Winchester semi-auto from my grandfather.  I wanted the old lever action 73 - I think it was 38? something.  He gave it to my cousin who promptly sold it for God knows what - he was/is a jerk.

 

STL Suomi

 

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I have my grandfather’s 1917 S&W revolver. It is a low serial number PawPaw was in the army in 1916 and went into Mexico after Pancho Villa.  Pershing told his troops they could be the first to go to France or be instructors recruiters etc.  PawPaw said he had seen enough in Mexico and I have a picture of him in his uniform in Boston with a recruiter badge on his cap.  He also was a sergeant at a POW camp in Missouri for Germans. After the war he carried his Smith while running whiskey

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My family wasn't much for sentimental and firearms with one exception:

This one was carried by my GG-Uncle who had to use it for the purpose it was made.

It's a .32 rimfire and it worked. 

.32 Rimfire 008.JPG

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One wonderful Christmas when I was maybe 9 years old my Granddad gave me his Springfield model 56 .22 bolt action. He said he paid about $9.00 for it new. Long heavy barrel, 5 shot magazine. He killed more rabbits during the Depression with it than I could ever imagine, he once told me. Very accurate rifle.

 

Now, I give guns to my dad. ;)

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I have my Grandfathers Winchester M12 12 ga shotgun, also his solid gold Hamilton RR watch. I have my Dad's Sporterized 03 Springfield, Browning 3" O/U 12 ga shotgun and S & W 686 . We also have my wife's Dad's Winchester M12 Pigeon Grade Trap Gun, his Stevens .22 semiauto rifle and her Great Grandfather's ML BP double barrel  12 ga shotgun.

 

I also have several hunting & pocket knives from relatives that are now collectors and worth quite a bit today by collectors. 

 

Everything gets passed on to family including whatever is left from my collection.

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Unless I talk my parents into getting something, I won't inherit any guns from them, they aren't anti-gun they just move around a lot and haven't ever felt like they needed one.  When my grandpa passed away, grandma gave me a bunch of his 270 Winchester and 30-06 hunting ammo.  The guns went to the uncles.  I'm hoping to pick up a rifle someday to shoot some of Grandpa's ammo at some white tails with my kids.  Grandpa was more into moose, elk and caribou, but I don't have many of them around where I am now.  

 

Edit, before he passed, he did give me all his fishing tackle box, and I do treasure that.  I spent a lot of time when I was younger in a canoe with him.  There was also that time my toddler brother went down the ice fishing hole and we had to pull him out.. that was fun!

 

I also helped a friend liquidate his gun collection before he passed away from ALS this last January.  He gave me his CVA 1860 Kit gun as a thank you, it helped Jump start me into CAS this last year and it's one of my favorite guns now.  Plan to take his son to a cowboy match in Tulsa sometime this summer.  it's pictured on my profile banner now.

Edited by El CupAJoe
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I've got a Winchester 1894 (made in 1910).  It was given to my father by a family friend in 1963.  Dad gave it to my younger brother, who came by my house on his way to a pawn shop.  I gave him a hundred for the rifle and it's been with me for nearly 30 years now.  Justin, my brother, passed in '06.  

 

I have my Dad's Ithaca 37 16 gauge he cut down for self defense many years ago.  It's a 16 gauge, cut to legal length (20" barrel).  I also have his Ruger Single Six in 22 magnum.  Im certain there was a 22 lr cylinder to go with it, but it remains undiscovered.  Both guns were given to me by my step mother since Dad passed in '15.

 

I am holding three guns for my niece that belonged to my middle brother.  David passed in '17, and I took custody of his stuff until his daughter (9 years old at the passing of my brother) gets old enough to appreciate them.  A Ruger LC9, an Ithaca M-66 super single 410 and a Mossberg 500 20 gauge.  

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My dad gave me his Cadet Model Trapdoor Springfield 45-70 one day when I was up visiting him.  He told me to take it because I doing Cowboy Action Shooting.  Since he passed 5 years ago, my brother and I picked out for ourselves a number of his guns and our sister got the sale proceeds of another gun to help even things out.  Getting the gift of the 45-70 from my dad gave me the incentive to start getting some good safes.

 

I don't have any children or grandchildren, but I intend to spread around my guns to my nephews, cousins and honorary nephew (I'm a friend of the family and addressed as 'Uncle").

 

There is a judge in the next county who belongs to one of my clubs.  He is smitten with my Mark VI .455 Webley and frequently asks me if I'm interested in selling it.  My response is always the same, "At my estate sale."  What he doesn't know is I put in my Will for him to get it, along with the shells and manual.  I like to make sure things go to someone who will appreciate them.

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When my dad passed a few years ago my mom offered me his guns which upset my anti gun siblings

 

The first was a hi-standard victor 22 which I traded for a new 1873 (miroku) winchester

 

The other was this Smith and Wesson M 19

 

 

s&w 19.jpg

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7 minutes ago, LW McQuade said:

When my dad passed a few years ago my mom offered me his guns which upset my anti gun siblings

 

I count myself lucky: 6 siblings, none of whom are anti-gun. The opposite, in fact. The five brothers divided our dad's gun by lot to make it fair; he had quite a few.

 

No antis among the many offspring, including lots of grandkids, nieces and nephews, etc. And the spouses. It's good.

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I recieved a Marlin 94 original in 44wcf . From my step Dad .

Also a Springfield 45-70 Model 73. 

Also recieved a Winchester 94 in 30-30 Made Just before WW2.

My uncle gave me a winchester 22 Pump can't remember model number, its in back of safe .

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I have my Dad's Western Field .30-30 and we also have my In Law's old Winchester .22 and H&R 12 Gauge.

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On 2/20/2021 at 3:00 PM, Cider Creek Shootist said:

  My Dad gave me his little Winchester 22 cal bolt action rifle when I was just knee high to a short duck . I was only 5 yo but he was headed to a TB Hospital and wanted to make sure I ended up with it , just in case things went bad . Took a long time and the loss of part of both lungs but he made it out all right and that was the gun he taught me to shoot with . Happy ending to a not so happy start .

 We were visiting my Grandpa in Tennessee one summer when I was about 10 and my Grandpa said he had something he wanted to give me if I wanted it . He handed me his Long Tom 12 ga shotgun . I gotta tell ya , I got about 3 inches taller right there on the spot . Single barrel 36 inches long with exposed hammer . Kicked like ............... well you know.

 Both guns have now been passed on to my Grandkids now along with the memories that went with them. So I guess the question is , What got passed down to you , and does it have a home when your done with it ?

 

           Cider

 

Cider, here's my dad's rifle.  Mom bought Dad the .22 Winchester rifle pictured below for Christmas, 1946, so he could use it to slaughter hogs and shoot cottontails for the table.  I was less than 3 months old.  Cost Mom the grand total of $15 and she said it threw the family budget into a spin for few months.  I learned to shoot and hunt with that rifle.  Dad gave me his rifle for my 16th birthday.  As I have no children, it's promised to one of my nephews with the promise it stays in the family.  Dad's Rifle is still a tack driver.  I've slayed many a cottontail with Dad's Rifle.

 

Winchester Model 67, "Dad's Rifle" in .22 Short, Long, & Long Rifle.

PTZuUe.jpg

 

MS6Yfq.jpg

 

MluIyI.jpg

 

Took Dad's Rifle to the range.  Wanted to know if it was still shooting straight, so I set up a target at 25 yards and took a test shot....

CfJCgy.jpg

 

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Dad gave me his Remington Model 6 22LR (1901-1933).
It came to him from his uncle Floyd who used to shoot in wild west shows.
As a lad, I spent many hours crawling through the sage bush with that rifle, chasing after prairie dogs.
I passed it on to the burglar who ransacked my house and stole the rifle and all my camera equipment.

Dad also left me his Remington 742 Woodsmaster, which still lives in the back of my safe.
This is the one that gave me my first black eye as a wee lad shooting at the gravel pit.
I understand this model is so flaky... if used as a boat anchor, it would sink intermittently.

What Dad didn't leave me:  his 1911 from WW2, and his three Garands.
The 1911 was already given away, and I was too stupid at the time to take the three Garands when offered to me.

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14 hours ago, Birdgun Quail, SASS #63663 said:

Cider, here's my dad's rifle.  Mom bought Dad the .22 Winchester rifle pictured below for Christmas, 1946, so he could use it to slaughter hogs and shoot cottontails for the table.  I was less than 3 months old.  Cost Mom the grand total of $15 and she said it threw the family budget into a spin for few months.  I learned to shoot and hunt with that rifle.  Dad gave me his rifle for my 16th birthday.  As I have no children, it's promised to one of my nephews with the promise it stays in the family.  Dad's Rifle is still a tack driver.  I've slayed many a cottontail with Dad's Rifle.

 

Winchester Model 67, "Dad's Rifle" in .22 Short, Long, & Long Rifle.

PTZuUe.jpg

 

MS6Yfq.jpg

 

MluIyI.jpg

 

Took Dad's Rifle to the range.  Wanted to know if it was still shooting straight, so I set up a target at 25 yards and took a test shot....

CfJCgy.jpg

 

Got one just like it with a similiar story.

 

I was born in 1941 and the first child in my family and the first in all my Dad's boyhood friends. In 1943, my Dad's best friend (who was in the Army) was leaving for England and would eventually be in the landing at D-Day. He gave my dad a brand new Winchester M 67 for, He wanted to give me my first gun if he didn't return.

 

He did come home, a much decorated soldier. I used the rifle for over 60 years until 2012. My dad passed away and the son of my Dad's friend, Dennis  was at the services. He and I have been friends since his birth and hunted and fished together all our lives.. Both of our dad's were gone and I hade a son (he is 50 and single with no kids) and Dennis has several grandkids. I gave the rifle to him for his Grandkids since this is where I got it. Unfortunately, Dennis is gone now too, but I know that old Winchester is in good hands.

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My family has never been into guns though my Dad had a few when he died. The gun that he owned that I dearly wanted was a S&W K22 Masterpiece with an 8 3/8 barrel. A couple years after his death my Mom asked me if I wanted any of my Dad’s guns. I told her I wanted “that really cool .22 revolver.” Completely forgetting he also had a High Standard “Sentinel Mk IV” .22 Magnum revolver. That was the one she sent me. I was begrudgingly grateful. She had given the K-22 to a friend of my Dad’s that I couldn’t stand and that Dirtbag wouldn’t let me have that revolver at any cost. 
 

Anyway, that High Standard was messed up. I replaced the cylinder and installed a 4” barrel on it, it had a 2” barrel. I replaced the springs in it and it turned out to be a nifty 9 shot .22 Magnum and with heavier loads was a bit of a tack driver. I ended up giving it to my little sister a couple of years ago. She needed a house gun and her wrists can’t take recoil. She loves it and she can shoot well with it so that makes me feel good. 
 

I haven’t decided what will happen to my guns. I am hoping not to have to make a decision on that for a couple more decades. ;)

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My dad gave me an 1890 Winchester .22. It was my Grandad's on Moms side. Grandpa only had 1 son and knew he would probably sell it. It was made in 1911. It will be passed to one of my grandkids. Also bought my wife's Grandads guns. Can't remember off hand hand what they are. I do know one is .270 and one is 30-30. They are really interesting because he lost both hands in a corn picker and the forestocks are fitted for his hooks.

Edited by Grumpy Old Man
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My dad didn't own any of the guns we hunted with.  They all belonged to an uncle I only met once.  He did buy me a shotgun for Christmas, but that was stolen from my house about 10 years later.  What he did hand down to me was a love for for the M14.  The Springfield M1A was the first rifle I ever bought with my own money and it's still my favorite gun to shoot.  Many a hunting and fishing trip was spent filling my head with the virtues and versatility of the mighty M14 (and coincidentally the flaws and folly of the M16) and I guess some of that stuck. 

 

My grandpa had some guns that I dearly wanted to inherit, but his son got them instead (no surprise).  I let him know I was a gun collector and asked if he ever wanted to get rid of them to give me first crack at buying them. 

 

My aunt gave me a H&R 632 that used to belong to 2 of my uncles (it got passed around a bit), one of whom passed a couple years ago.  Turns out it's a mighty fine choice for pocket pistol side matches.  I need to ask the uncle who is still alive if there's any more to the story on this gun. 

 

Aside from that, I inherited a lot of guns as a dowry from my wife's dad.  It was a decent collection, but the gem was the colt SAA made in 1877.  It's what finally got me into cowboy action shooting. 

 

I also have a number of guns I've bought from the widows of friends and cowboy pards that I will always cherish.  But those weren't handmedowns. 

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