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I've been bitten by the bug unfortunately.  You all warned me.  Family and friends that have owned firearms for years warned me.  Now aside from just the core of SASS and must-have firearms of a list I kept very small, I find that list of 'must-haves' to be growing exponentially.

 

Now aside from the basic SASS needs, I also require the following:

1) A Colt 1903 Hammerless in .32 ACP

2) A Smith & Wesson Safety Hammerless

3) A Colt Lighting Thunderer

4) A Ruger Mini-14

5) A Henry Big Bore X

6) A Henry Longranger 

7) A Colt Detective Special

8) A Remington Model 8

9) A Hawken rifle

 

If anyone is feeling charitable and is looking for the son or grandson they never had to pass things onto, message me for my contact information for prompt donation!  Yes, bitten by the bug *cough cough*

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Oh pard, there's one glaring hole in your "must have" list:  A Sharps!   If you haven't seen the movie, Quigley Down Under, make sure you do.  And then start saving your pennies for one of those rifles!  I shoot cartridges packed with The Holy Black in mine, over a bullet I cast myself.  However, some of them are proofed for modern loads, too.  

 

There are basically three ways to get one these days, except for an original antique that would be rather cost prohibitive.  The first is a Uberti clone, many of which are marketed by Cabela's.  That isn't my favorite route, as there are two manufacturers in the U.S. who make them to a much higher quality standard.  The one I have is by Shiloh Sharps.  The other U.S. maker is C. Sharps.  Both are unbeatable!  

 

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2 hours ago, Whiskey Hicks said:

I've been bitten by the bug unfortunately.  You all warned me.  Family and friends that have owned firearms for years warned me.  Now aside from just the core of SASS and must-have firearms of a list I kept very small, I find that list of 'must-haves' to be growing exponentially.

 

Now aside from the basic SASS needs, I also require the following:

1) A Colt 1903 Hammerless in .32 ACP

2) A Smith & Wesson Safety Hammerless

3) A Colt Lighting Thunderer

4) A Ruger Mini-14

5) A Henry Big Bore X

6) A Henry Longranger 

7) A Colt Detective Special

8) A Remington Model 8

9) A Hawken rifle

 

If anyone is feeling charitable and is looking for the son or grandson they never had to pass things onto, message me for my contact information for prompt donation!  Yes, bitten by the bug *cough cough*

WH,

 

 All great choices. Although #1 is only a collectible, not a shooter. No one ever hit anything with a 1903 hammerless that was more than arm's length away.

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2 hours ago, Whiskey Hicks said:

 

3) A Colt Lighting Thunderer

Unless you have one of each, it would either be a Lightning or a Thunderer. The real name is M1877 but one of the big Colt distributers decided that catchy names were better for sales. The Thunderer is .41 Colt. The Lightning is .38 Colt. If you can find one, the Rainmaker is in .32 Colt. I would recommend you don't use smokeless unless they are proofed for it. I have two Lightnings and one Thunderer, two of which are from the 1880s. I also have a Colt Frontier Six Shooter from 1902 and a Colt New Line in .38 Colt from the late 1870s.

Have fun with the infection.

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You also forgot a Highwall...

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Hi, my name is Pat Riot...and I am an “Enabler”.

 

You do need these guns, but as Cyrus said “...there is a glaring hole in your must have list.”

A few, actually. 
1. Smith & Wesson model 10 - great revolver

2. Ruger PC Carbine - fun, fun, fun 

3. a .22 LR rifle and handgun - I would recommend a Ruger 10/22 or a Henry .22 and perhaps a Ruger SA revolver. 


I will stop here. I would hate to be the cause of your anxiety attack or depression, whichever might come first. 
 

Now, there is hope. For a small fee I can provide you with several recordings of my wife and things that she’s said to me that will be sure to snap you back into reality or put things into perspective. Voice recordings are minimal pricing but video, well, that would be a bit more because it would take time because I would wait an appropriate amount of time between “silly ideas” to get the right roll-eyed exasperated reaction on video. :lol:

( Seriously. I am kidding...she doesn’t roll her eyes that much) ;)
 

One thing you must remember is you are in a den of “Enablers” right now as you read this. We love to encourage others to spend their money on things we think they should have...you are welcome. ;)

“Enablers” also live to live vicariously through others but it’s not a bad thing really. It’s actually a learned trait from childhood. Have you never said to your Mom or Dad “...but Joey has one! Why can’t I?”. It’s literally the same thing. 
You see, you buy a really cool ABC brand of bang-stick then we, living vicariously through you, we get to participate in the event through admiration, envy or approval (as it may have been our idea). If we do not already have the item that you bought, but we desire one, we can use this information to justify the purchase in our own minds or to convince others that it is necessary that we own one as well. 
 

Now, one thing my counselor told me...Oh, you will need to get a counselor eventually because I can guarantee you my friend, you too will become an enabler. You have taken your first toke ( cute...auto correct wanted me to use the word Tokerev instead of “toke”. My iPhone has also become an Enabler :D I love my iPhone) 
Anyway, my counselor (wife, in my case)  told me that before I run out and purchase every gun I desire and put us into debt leading to bankruptcy I should table each “silly idea” for an appropriate amount of time to be sure that the “silly idea” is actually what I really want. What counselors do not realize is that one does not just drop a “silly idea” completely. The “enabled” tend to just rearrange their hierarchy list so that the next “silly idea” is the most logical “silly idea” on a long list of “silly ideas”. ;)

I love my counselor so I let her believe she actually has a say in what I do with my list. I can actually give you pointers on this as well, if you like. 
 

Now, what you need to do is move forward with the top gun on your list and then tell us about it. We are dying to live vicariously, I mean, hear about it. :D

 

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Au contraire! The 1903 Colts are good shooters even with the crappy sights. PS the repro mags from Triple K work for them too.

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Hicks, this is a journey not a destination.  I bought my first gun with tobacco farming money in 1979.  I have bought many and own some, but I still have a list (Winchester 101 Trap, S&W 296 and Winchester 63).

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This collecting business whether it is firearms or silver dollars or whatever is very infectious. Congratulations, you bave been bitten by the bug, so enjoy!

 

Not long ago I acquired the large bore revolver virus. My elbows may never forgive me. 

 

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It'sa funny thing, I too "had" a long list and had actually achieved many of the list but I will have miraculously lost them all in a tragic boating accident in the Sahara desert on Jan. 20. :lol:

 

Kajun

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On 1/10/2021 at 4:58 AM, Whiskey Hicks said:

I've been bitten by the bug unfortunately.  You all warned me.  Family and friends that have owned firearms for years warned me.  Now aside from just the core of SASS and must-have firearms of a list I kept very small, I find that list of 'must-haves' to be growing exponentially.

 

Now aside from the basic SASS needs, I also require the following:

1) A Colt 1903 Hammerless in .32 ACP

2) A Smith & Wesson Safety Hammerless

3) A Colt Lighting Thunderer

4) A Ruger Mini-14

5) A Henry Big Bore X

6) A Henry Longranger 

7) A Colt Detective Special

8) A Remington Model 8

9) A Hawken rifle

 

If anyone is feeling charitable and is looking for the son or grandson they never had to pass things onto, message me for my contact information for prompt donation!  Yes, bitten by the bug *cough cough*

I have numbers 1, 7, and 8.  No they aren't for sale.

 

The Colt is the first gun I ever shot anyone with, and my only AD (so far).  I bought it from A man I worked for in 1961 and made some new grips for it.  I sold it after the accident and have since owned three more.  This is the last one I'll ever buy.  It came withe two "two tone: Colt Magazine and is about 90% outside and nearly perfect internally.  They have been put down as a useless and inaccurate gun, but I've found them to be good out to about 30 yards.  Not target accurate, but good enough in the heat of a fight.   I carried it as a backup piece for a few years.

 

I own, but haven't yet taken possession of, a 1952 Detective Special with a 2" barrel and in near new condition.  I just ordered a Tyler T grip for it simply because that's how they are supposed to look.  Might add a trigger shoe from them, too.

 

The Remington Model 8 in .35 belonged to my dad.  It was made in 1923, Dad bought it from a man named Arch Simms in 1943 in Pocatello, Idaho, I bought it from Dad in 1963.  I had it top to bottom restored  a bit over a year ago, including new wood, and remounting the original Marble's tang sight.  The gun has taken dozens of mule deer, one white tail, two Rocky Mountain elk, a pair of black bears, a cougar, a pronghorn, and some other odds and ends game. 

 

I also have a Lyman Great Plains rifle in .50 that is close enough to a real Hawken to suit me.  It's dead on accurate with a 490 round ball over 70 grains go Gearhart and Owens FFFg powder and a pillow ricking parch.  I still have about a half pint of Thompson Center's Spit Patch to lube the patches with.  At the rate I shoot nowadays, that's good for 60-70 years.

Edited by Forty Rod SASS 3935
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9 minutes ago, Dantankerous said:

This collecting business whether it is firearms or silver dollars or whatever is very infectious. Congratulations, you bave been bitten by the bug, so enjoy!

 

Not long ago I acquired the large bore revolver virus. My elbows may never forgive me. 

 

Hubby started shooting Buntlines right-handed Duelist-style. When he decided he wanted to shoot faster, he had to practice. His elbow told him to get shorter barrels.

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4 hours ago, Whiskey Hicks said:

 

4) A Ruger Mini-14

Be careful with the design changes. My wife used to work at Ruger here in Prescott and she surprised me with a Mini-14 one Christmas (1992-1993). I tried taking it prairie dog hunting and found out it wasn't able to hold a six-inch pattern at 25-yards. I still loved it. Decades later I was trying to see what I could do to make it more accurate and found this was a common trait on older Mini-14s and they made a design change to the barrel, if I remember correctly, adding more mass to the area by the chamber. This supposedly made it better. Since it was basically just a safe queen I had thought about selling it but it seemed that everyone but me knew about the inaccuracy issue of older Mini-14s. During the big spike in AR-style weapons back in 2012-ish I took it to a local gun show hoping to get $500. Fate took a hand and I spotted a dealer with a large, beautiful Navajo Yei-bi-chei rug for sale. Being that we were in Indiana at the time, he didn't think he would have any interest in the expensive rug. I offered him my Mini-14 in exchange. His eyes lit up, a smile covered his face and we traded. I collect Navajo rugs and I estimated the rug to be worth $1500 so I was ecstatic. I think he immediately sold my Mini-14 for $850 to someone else. We all were happy at the moment. I still am as the rug is hanging beside me as I write this.

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2 hours ago, Abilene Slim SASS 81783 said:

 

WH,

 

  I stand corrected.  If you spend @120 -140 hours/week, and shoot ten of thousand of rounds/week from various firearms,  like Hikock 45, you too can make a Colt Pocket Hammerless accurate. :P

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I don't see any 1911's on that list, either. What self-respecting gun owner doesn't want a 1911? :D 

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5 hours ago, Capt. R. Hugh Kidnme said:

 All great choices. Although #1 is only a collectible, not a shooter. No one ever hit anything with a 1903 hammerless that was more than arm's length away.

My first 1903 couldn't keep all it's shots on an 8x11 sheet of paper at 20ft. When I cleaned the gun I found a dent in the muzzle, recrowned the muzzle an then it blew out the bullseye.

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Who wants to be limited to shooting only "reproduction" cowboy guns? The feeling of shooting an original WINCHESTER 1873 or 1892 will light you up permanently. I can't help but wonder who else has shot mine and where it's been since it was new in 1890.

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8 hours ago, Capt. R. Hugh Kidnme said:

WH,

 

 All great choices. Although #1 is only a collectible, not a shooter. No one ever hit anything with a 1903 hammerless that was more than arm's length away.

I'll have to disagree with ya there.  I've got a very nice 1903 Colt pocket automatic and it's deadly accurate out to at least 6-8 feet.

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11 hours ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

Oh pard, there's one glaring hole in your "must have" list:  A Sharps!

 

Yep. But you forgot Pedersoli. Much nicer than a Uberti. 

 

 

 

My additions

Spencer Rifle or Carbine in 56-50

74 Sharps in 45-70

63 Sharps

High Wall in 38-55

1887/1901 Shotgun

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14 hours ago, Charlie MacNeil, SASS #48580 said:

I don't see any 1911's on that list, either. What self-respecting gun owner doesn't want a 1911? :D 

Oh but that was for the eventual wanting to try Wild Bunch, so that’s categorized under ‘SASS needs’ to sneak by the girlfriend in the household budget.

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14 hours ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

Might have been his first acquisition?

My first acquisition was a Charter Arms snubby in .38 back in 2013. I followed that up with a Traditions Heritage series .45 Colt, the black matte and basic walnut with the transfer safety bar (didn’t know what that meant at the time) early 2020. Went shooting with some cousins in my hometown where my uncle told me about SASS.

 

Picked up my grandfather’s old .22 LR Winchester bolt varmint rifle. Dad passed a few years ago, and I was finally able to get it from my stepmother this year.

 

Then I bought the Husqvarna SxS here and a Stevens just recently at a LGS.

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This is an essay I wrote a few years ago, for my grandchildren. I trot it out every now and again. Just my thoughts.

 

 

Guns Every “American Gun Owner” Should Have

 

This is my opinion, only, of course, but then, my opinion is the only one that counts.

 

First and foremost, you need to own a good 22 rifle. Which kind don’t really matter. I’ve got ‘em all. Got some bolts, a lever, an automatic, a few pumps, a rolling block and a Martini action. Got single-shots and repeaters.

 

You need to have a 30/30 lever action. It should be a Winchester 94. The Marlin is acceptable, as long as it is 30/30. Nothing wrong with the 35 Remington – it’s a fine cartridge. But you need to have a 30/30. Can’t get much more American than a Winchester 30/30.

 

You need a 12-gauge pump – preferably a Remington 870. Now, there are lots of fine pumps out there. Winchester 12, Ithaca 37, Browning, etc. And there are many fine shotguns of other action types. But a shotgun just seems to say something. Over/under says “skeet shooter”. Side-by-Side says “elegant” and “European driven birds”. A pump is like a pickup truckor a station wagon. It says “everyday American”. And the 870 is the perfect pump. There are many fine gauges of shotgun. I, for some reason I cannot discern, am kinda partial to the 16. As I get older, I seem to like the 410 more and more. But, truthfully, anything you can do with any other gun, you can do with a 12 gauge.

 

You need to own a Smith and Wesson Military and Police 38 Special revolver. It’s sad that I had to specify. At one time, if you said S&W M&P, everyone knew what you meant. K frame 38 special. But lately Smith has started to call their line of plastic fantastic automatic pistols M&P, and also their copy of the Colt AR15 is the M&P rifle. But I digress. Since1957, when they started to give them model numbers, instead of names, the M&P has been called the Model 10. You can’t get much simpler than a double action revolver. Just point it and pull the trigger. No safety to worry about. Don’t need cocked. Just “bang”. 38 Special, while not the “best” anti-personnel round out there, will do its job if you do yours. K frame is big enough to give some weight to hold down recoil, but not so big that it’s too heavy to tote. You got six shots. It’s accurate enough for plinking, robust enough for combat. If you’re only going to own ONE pistol, it should be this one. The quintessential M&P is a 4-inch skinny barrel, but as long as you have one of some description, that’s okay. I’ll even allow a Model 13, which is an M&P in 357, a 64, which is a stainless steel Model 10, and a 65, which is a stainless Model 13.

 

You need a 1911 in 45 ACP. Now, there are many makers out there. There are the wartime guns. World War 1 – Remington Arms, along with Colt and the US Armory at Springfield. The World War 2 guns – Colt and Springfield, along with Ithaca shotgun, Remington-Rand typewriters, Singer Sewing Machine, Union Switch and Signal. Then there are the commercial guns. Colt and Springfield (not the military arsenal – different company but same name), Kimber, Auto Ordnance, Arcadia Machine and Tool, and a whole slew of ‘em made in the Philippines and sold here under different names – Dan Wesson, Rock Island Arsenal, Charles Daly. Remington sells one now, as does Ruger, S&W, and SIG. You can get them in lots of sizes – full size, commander size, officer size, compact officer size and long slide. You can get them in lots of calibers – 22LR, 9mm Luger, 38 Super, 40 S&W, 10mm and 45 ACP are the most common, but there are others available. You can get them in any configuration from military dress to totally tricked out, and spend anywhere from around 500 to several thousand. But I think everyone needs to have at least one box-stock 5-inch government model 1911A1.

 

You should have a bolt action “deer rifle”, with a scope.

 

Lastly, you need a good 22 pistol. There are so many of them. Revolvers and automatics. Single actions and double. Sizes from dinky to huge. I’m partial to S&W double action revolvers and Ruger single actions and autoloaders.

 

So, there you go. Seven guns. Everyone that calls himself a gun owner should own these seven guns.

 

Everything else is gravy.

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Whiskey Hicks, you'll find a lot of fun with some .45-70's in your collection:

The Sharps is a definite, but don't forget the Rolling Block, the Trapdoor, the Highwall and then there's the lever guns............

.

.

I think I may need help with my addiction.

Rolling Block Close up.JPG

1874 Sharps (Pedersoli) close-up side view 013 (3).JPG

.45-70 Springfield 001 (4).JPG

1885 Hiwall in .45-70 with Lyman sight 015.JPG

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On 1/11/2021 at 7:37 AM, Alpo said:

This is an essay I wrote a few years ago, for my grandchildren. I trot it out every now and again. Just my thoughts.

 

 

Guns Every “American Gun Owner” Should Have

 

This is my opinion, only, of course, but then, my opinion is the only one that counts.

 

First and foremost, you need to own a good 22 rifle. Which kind don’t really matter. I’ve got ‘em all. Got some bolts, a lever, an automatic, a few pumps, a rolling block and a Martini action. Got single-shots and repeaters.

 

You need to have a 30/30 lever action. It should be a Winchester 94. The Marlin is acceptable, as long as it is 30/30. Nothing wrong with the 35 Remington – it’s a fine cartridge. But you need to have a 30/30. Can’t get much more American than a Winchester 30/30.

 

You need a 12-gauge pump – preferably a Remington 870. Now, there are lots of fine pumps out there. Winchester 12, Ithaca 37, Browning, etc. And there are many fine shotguns of other action types. But a shotgun just seems to say something. Over/under says “skeet shooter”. Side-by-Side says “elegant” and “European driven birds”. A pump is like a pickup truckor a station wagon. It says “everyday American”. And the 870 is the perfect pump. There are many fine gauges of shotgun. I, for some reason I cannot discern, am kinda partial to the 16. As I get older, I seem to like the 410 more and more. But, truthfully, anything you can do with any other gun, you can do with a 12 gauge.

 

You need to own a Smith and Wesson Military and Police 38 Special revolver. It’s sad that I had to specify. At one time, if you said S&W M&P, everyone knew what you meant. K frame 38 special. But lately Smith has started to call their line of plastic fantastic automatic pistols M&P, and also their copy of the Colt AR15 is the M&P rifle. But I digress. Since1957, when they started to give them model numbers, instead of names, the M&P has been called the Model 10. You can’t get much simpler than a double action revolver. Just point it and pull the trigger. No safety to worry about. Don’t need cocked. Just “bang”. 38 Special, while not the “best” anti-personnel round out there, will do its job if you do yours. K frame is big enough to give some weight to hold down recoil, but not so big that it’s too heavy to tote. You got six shots. It’s accurate enough for plinking, robust enough for combat. If you’re only going to own ONE pistol, it should be this one. The quintessential M&P is a 4-inch skinny barrel, but as long as you have one of some description, that’s okay. I’ll even allow a Model 13, which is an M&P in 357, a 64, which is a stainless steel Model 10, and a 65, which is a stainless Model 13.

 

You need a 1911 in 45 ACP. Now, there are many makers out there. There are the wartime guns. World War 1 – Remington Arms, along with Colt and the US Armory at Springfield. The World War 2 guns – Colt and Springfield, along with Ithaca shotgun, Remington-Rand typewriters, Singer Sewing Machine, Union Switch and Signal. Then there are the commercial guns. Colt and Springfield (not the military arsenal – different company but same name), Kimber, Auto Ordnance, Arcadia Machine and Tool, and a whole slew of ‘em made in the Philippines and sold here under different names – Dan Wesson, Rock Island Arsenal, Charles Daly. Remington sells one now, as does Ruger, S&W, and SIG. You can get them in lots of sizes – full size, commander size, officer size, compact officer size and long slide. You can get them in lots of calibers – 22LR, 9mm Luger, 38 Super, 40 S&W, 10mm and 45 ACP are the most common, but there are others available. You can get them in any configuration from military dress to totally tricked out, and spend anywhere from around 500 to several thousand. But I think everyone needs to have at least one box-stock 5-inch government model 1911A1.

 

You should have a bolt action “deer rifle”, with a scope.

 

Lastly, you need a good 22 pistol. There are so many of them. Revolvers and automatics. Single actions and double. Sizes from dinky to huge. I’m partial to S&W double action revolvers and Ruger single actions and autoloaders.

 

So, there you go. Seven guns. Everyone that calls himself a gun owner should own these seven guns.

 

Everything else is gravy.

 

Well, Dang! I have at least one, some more, from each category except "deer rifle", and I'm way to old (elder statesmen, almost cattle baron) to be one of your grandkids!!   :D

:FlagAm:

 

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On 1/11/2021 at 6:37 AM, Alpo said:

This is an essay I wrote a few years ago, for my grandchildren. I trot it out every now and again. Just my thoughts.

 

 

Guns Every “American Gun Owner” Should Have

 

This is my opinion, only, of course, but then, my opinion is the only one that counts.

 

First and foremost, you need to own a good 22 rifle. Which kind don’t really matter. I’ve got ‘em all. Got some bolts, a lever, an automatic, a few pumps, a rolling block and a Martini action. Got single-shots and repeaters.

 

You need to have a 30/30 lever action. It should be a Winchester 94. The Marlin is acceptable, as long as it is 30/30. Nothing wrong with the 35 Remington – it’s a fine cartridge. But you need to have a 30/30. Can’t get much more American than a Winchester 30/30.

 

You need a 12-gauge pump – preferably a Remington 870. Now, there are lots of fine pumps out there. Winchester 12, Ithaca 37, Browning, etc. And there are many fine shotguns of other action types. But a shotgun just seems to say something. Over/under says “skeet shooter”. Side-by-Side says “elegant” and “European driven birds”. A pump is like a pickup truckor a station wagon. It says “everyday American”. And the 870 is the perfect pump. There are many fine gauges of shotgun. I, for some reason I cannot discern, am kinda partial to the 16. As I get older, I seem to like the 410 more and more. But, truthfully, anything you can do with any other gun, you can do with a 12 gauge.

 

You need to own a Smith and Wesson Military and Police 38 Special revolver. It’s sad that I had to specify. At one time, if you said S&W M&P, everyone knew what you meant. K frame 38 special. But lately Smith has started to call their line of plastic fantastic automatic pistols M&P, and also their copy of the Colt AR15 is the M&P rifle. But I digress. Since1957, when they started to give them model numbers, instead of names, the M&P has been called the Model 10. You can’t get much simpler than a double action revolver. Just point it and pull the trigger. No safety to worry about. Don’t need cocked. Just “bang”. 38 Special, while not the “best” anti-personnel round out there, will do its job if you do yours. K frame is big enough to give some weight to hold down recoil, but not so big that it’s too heavy to tote. You got six shots. It’s accurate enough for plinking, robust enough for combat. If you’re only going to own ONE pistol, it should be this one. The quintessential M&P is a 4-inch skinny barrel, but as long as you have one of some description, that’s okay. I’ll even allow a Model 13, which is an M&P in 357, a 64, which is a stainless steel Model 10, and a 65, which is a stainless Model 13.

 

You need a 1911 in 45 ACP. Now, there are many makers out there. There are the wartime guns. World War 1 – Remington Arms, along with Colt and the US Armory at Springfield. The World War 2 guns – Colt and Springfield, along with Ithaca shotgun, Remington-Rand typewriters, Singer Sewing Machine, Union Switch and Signal. Then there are the commercial guns. Colt and Springfield (not the military arsenal – different company but same name), Kimber, Auto Ordnance, Arcadia Machine and Tool, and a whole slew of ‘em made in the Philippines and sold here under different names – Dan Wesson, Rock Island Arsenal, Charles Daly. Remington sells one now, as does Ruger, S&W, and SIG. You can get them in lots of sizes – full size, commander size, officer size, compact officer size and long slide. You can get them in lots of calibers – 22LR, 9mm Luger, 38 Super, 40 S&W, 10mm and 45 ACP are the most common, but there are others available. You can get them in any configuration from military dress to totally tricked out, and spend anywhere from around 500 to several thousand. But I think everyone needs to have at least one box-stock 5-inch government model 1911A1.

 

You should have a bolt action “deer rifle”, with a scope.

 

Lastly, you need a good 22 pistol. There are so many of them. Revolvers and automatics. Single actions and double. Sizes from dinky to huge. I’m partial to S&W double action revolvers and Ruger single actions and autoloaders.

 

So, there you go. Seven guns. Everyone that calls himself a gun owner should own these seven guns.

 

Everything else is gravy.

Check!

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For a lever action rifle a pre 1949 Savage model 99 is a good choice; because, you don't need Lever Evolution cartridges to shoot pointy bullets.  The 5 shot rotary magazine makes for a svelte rifle.  I have a break down version in 300 Savage made in 1927 that belong to the misses uncle.  Missed out on his 300 Savage Remington model 8.  My firearms bucket list includes a Garand to go with the 1944 M1 Carbine with the original flip up rear sight.  Maybe the misses won't complain too much if I buy one in 2021.  I am not a fan of bolt action rifles; because, there aren't many that are south paw friendly.  I do like the idea of Savage's straight pull models.  It is very simple to covert the bolt from one side to the other wo/tools.  Also, the locking mechanism is unique.  Other straight pulls use tilting or rotary bolt bolts.  Savage uses 5 balls the lock into recesses in a barrel extension.  The force of the gas pressure in the chamber & barrel increases the force on the balls.  The force only drops low enough to open the bolt when the bullet exits the muzzle.

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On 1/10/2021 at 12:29 PM, Charlie MacNeil, SASS #48580 said:

I don't see any 1911's on that list, either. What self-respecting gun owner doesn't want a 1911? :D 

Since this is about expensive taste, I'll admit to wanting a spendy 1911, specifically a Coonan .357 since if I had to only have 1 cartridge, that's the one I'd pick.  have more molds for the caliber than you can shake a stick at... edit, stick shaking still works, nevermind...

 

Apparently they are out of business again.  I always thought it would be fun to get the compact model and stick an extended barrel in it. :D

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