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Another example of people who are supposedly speaking the same language, but don't know what they're talking about.

 

A World War II war bride wrote to her mother back in England, and sent her a recipe. The recipe (and don't bother asking, I don't remember what it was) call for one cup of half and half. Her mother wrote her back saying, "half of what and half of what?"

 

That's where I'm at.

 

Exactly what is "clotted cream"?

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Don't know, but it sure doesn't sound like something I want to eat.:unsure: For the same reason I don't eat liver, it looks like a clot!

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9 minutes ago, Alpo said:

Exactly what is "clotted cream"?

 

 

Quote

 

Clotted cream (Cornish: dehen molys, sometimes called scalded, clouted, Devonshire or Cornish cream) is a thick cream made by indirectly heating full-cream cow's milk using steam or a water bath and then leaving it in shallow pans to cool slowly. During this time, the cream content rises to the surface and forms "clots" or "clouts", hence the name. It forms an essential part of a cream tea.

 

Although its origin is uncertain, the cream's production is commonly associated with dairy farms in southwest England and in particular the counties of Cornwall and Devon. The current largest commercial producer in the United Kingdom is Rodda's at Scorrier, Redruth, Cornwall, which can produce up to 25 tons of clotted cream a day. 

 

In 1998 the term Cornish clotted cream became a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) by European Union directive, as long as the milk is produced in Cornwall and the minimum fat content is 55%.

 

 

Edited by Sedalia Dave
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What Is Half-and-Half?

 

 

Quote

 

What Is Half-and-Half?

Half-and-half is simply a blend of equal parts milk and cream. Whereas heavy cream has at least 36 percent fat, half-and-half has between 10 and 18 percent. Half-and-half can be incorporated in recipes, but because of the lower fat content, it cannot be used to make whipped cream since it won't hold its peaks. It also won't thicken a sauce the way that heavy or whipping cream does.

Half-and-half is commonly used as a coffee creamer. Milk is traditionally used for tea since tea has far fewer dissolved solids and is thinner. But for a strong cup of coffee, many coffee drinkers find that half-and-half adds just the right body and richness.

A container of half-and-half from the grocery store must be immediately placed in the refrigerator. The tiny containers of half-and-half at the local coffee shop are sitting out because they are shelf-stable do not require refrigeration; they will actually keep at room temperature for up to six months. However, do check the expiration date.

 

Half-and-Half Varieties

You might encounter a variation called "fat-free half-and-half" which is confusing given half and half is made with milk and cream. The fat-free version replaces the milk fat with corn syrup and thickeners. It is not a very healthy option.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Eyesa Horg said:

Don't know, but it sure doesn't sound like something I want to eat.:unsure: For the same reason I don't eat liver, it looks like a clot!

You see it in English stories fairly often. Someone will eat their scones with strawberry jam and clotted cream.

 

Wondered if it was maybe an English term for whipped cream.

 

Apparently not.

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9 minutes ago, Sedalia Dave said:

thick cream made by indirectly heating full-cream cow's milk using steam or a water bath and then leaving it in shallow pans to cool slowly. During this time, the cream content rises to the surface and forms "clots" or "clouts", hence the name.

I wonder what the difference would be from just sitting your bucket full of milk in the spring house and letting it sit there overnight, so the cream rises to the surface, and then skimming It off, which of course leaves "skim milk".

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1 hour ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

Sorry but I would not eat it on the basis of the name. If someone served it and didn’t say what it was called I might like it. 

So you also would not try spotted dick, or toad in the hole?

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5 minutes ago, Crooked River Pete, SASS 43485 said:

That's why they call them "Rocky Mtn oysters"

Lucky for me I equate oyster with snot so calling the Rocky Mountain Oysters?...ain’t gonna change my mind on eating gonads. 

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