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Vendor Sued for Price Gouging


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Well, I’m not sure that I agree with this.  I can see filing price gouging suits on plywood or water after a storm, but ammo seems to be stretching it a bit. If folks don’t want it, they don’t have to buy it. I could be wrong. 

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5 minutes ago, Hoss said:

Well, I’m not sure that I agree with this.  I can see filing price gouging suits on plywood or water after a storm, but ammo seems to be stretching it a bit. If folks don’t want it, they don’t have to buy it. I could be wrong. 

 

This +1,000.

 

I'm not defending CTD by any means, in fact, I wouldn't order from CTD under any circumstances. That said, this Country was built on a concept called capitalism. This ammo/primer shortage was and is self induced by firearm owners not by some "Act of God" or storm. If stupid people want to buy ammo that is WAY overpriced, then let stupid people buy overpriced ammo. It isn't like they had no other alternative. What's next, sue a mom and pop hardware store for selling a five cent nail for twenty cents?

 

Just another idiotic lawsuit in an ocean of idiotic lawsuits.

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we have been complaining about  Not Cheaper than dirt for a while 

a buck a round for 9mm is crazy but they dont have gun to our heads 

Being in CA mail order ammo sales are a joke  ..

all ammo must be shipped to FFL  

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CTD did this the last time there was an ammo shortage.  I wouldn't buy from them, no matter what the price is.  There is capitalism and then there is price gouging.  There are numerous examples of customers who had purchased ammo when the pandemic started.  CTD cancelled their orders because they had purchased the ammo at the normal price.  I hope the Texas AG makes an example out of them.

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“Making these manual 'real-time' price changes caused confusion for consumers because the prices consumers saw on the website pages when selecting items for purchase were different from the prices that appeared in the final check-out cart“

 

That's why they got tagged

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8 hours ago, Hoss said:

Well, I’m not sure that I agree with this.  I can see filing price gouging suits on plywood or water after a storm, but ammo seems to be stretching it a bit. If folks don’t want it, they don’t have to buy it. I could be wrong. 

Scenario A:

I have a case of ammo I bought a while back, ammo prices are ridiculous, so I post it on GunBroker. Some fool pays me 5X what I paid for it.

 

Scenario B:

I have a business and have access to a distributors inventory. I buy all of the distributor's ammo as soon as it comes in the warehouse. I pay X for it. I then post it on Gunbroker and sell it for 5X what I paid. And in great part I can do this because there is none on store shelves (including my store).

 

Scenario B is price gouging.

 

Let's change B a bit... I buy it all and put it on my sales floor with a 5X markup. Nobody else has any to sell since I bought it all. Not an auction, so an even clearer case of gouging.

 

Anyway, now I'll go read the linked story.

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Read the story. Cheaper Than Dirt :lol: (what a surprise) is charged with changing the price during the time the item was selected in shopping to a higher price at checkout.

 

I rarely buy from CTD since the shipping is ridiculous. There is almost never a better price from CTD after delivery compared to, well, almost any other source.

 

But charging more in checkout than the price originally offered? That is another form of gouging. Although theiv'in would also fit the description if Texas has such a statute..

 

 

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This recent deal is them changing the price during the ordering process so at checkout it's a higher price. What they have done in the past is on completed in stock orders, days later they cancel the order. Then raise the price significantly and offer the same item for sale.

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Sorry. I am in the minority on this one.

They can change the price and charge whatever they want at any time. This is free enterprise.

On the other hand.

You are free to buy whatever you want, and are free to cancel the transaction if the price changes.

 

I bet you wouldn't hear any complaints if the price went down!

 

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"Making these manual 'real-time' price changes caused confusion for consumers because the prices consumers saw on the website pages when selecting items for purchase were different from the prices that appeared in the final check-out cart," the AG's office said in court documents. 

 

Am I missing something here? When the price appeared higher in the final checkout was that BEFORE you clicked and bought or AFTER? If it was before you could back out. If it was AFTER it's actually some type of fraud! 

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It wouldn't surprise me if  the AG had a previous order cancelled sometime in the past just to find out a few days later

that it was available at a 'jacked up' price.

 

And now its pay back time.   

 

..........Widder

 

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1 hour ago, Ace_of_Hearts said:

Sorry. I am in the minority on this one.

They can change the price and charge whatever they want at any time. This is free enterprise.

On the other hand.

You are free to buy whatever you want, and are free to cancel the transaction if the price changes.

 

I bet you wouldn't hear any complaints if the price went down!

 

But what about cancelling completed orders for "in stock" items and then listing the same item at higher prices? That's not the same to me as initially offering items at high prices.

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10 hours ago, Ace_of_Hearts said:

Sorry. I am in the minority on this one.

They can change the price and charge whatever they want at any time. This is free enterprise.

On the other hand.

You are free to buy whatever you want, and are free to cancel the transaction if the price changes.

 

I bet you wouldn't hear any complaints if the price went down!

 

 

 

I am kind of in this camp.

 

If they jack the price up. Just don't buy it. Simple.

 

CTD opened up a store near me a few years ago.

Went in one time. After looking at the prices. I walked out and never went back.

Guess a lot of other did also and they did not last long and the store closed.

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Pretty much the only thing I ever found that was CTD was the quality.  It did not take them long to figure out my game, the just stopped sending me the catalogs!  Now I just wish I could play the game with some of my medical prescription providers. 

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So let me get this straight.  I offer to sell a rifle for $700 on the classified adds and a shooter says "I'll take it. Money order is on the way". I post "rifle is sold". Then I think I could probably have sold at a higher price and cancel the sale. Followed by reposting the same rifle for $1500. Or instead, in a second scenario,  I offer the rifle for $1500 and people choose to buy the rifle or not. Many people here appear to think that the two situations are equivalent. They are not.

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1 hour ago, Smokin Gator SASS #29736 said:

So let me get this straight.  I offer to sell a rifle for $700 on the classified adds and a shooter says "I'll take it. Money order is on the way". I post "rifle is sold". Then I think I could probably have sold at a higher price and cancel the sale. Followed by reposting the same rifle for $1500. Or instead, in a second scenario,  I offer the rifle for $1500 and people choose to buy the rifle or not. Many people here appear to think that the two situations are equivalent. They are not.

Much depend on if you send the money order back!

Much depends on if you, in writing, say that the payment is accepted! (Thereby completing a contract) You posted "Rifle is sold" could be considered  completing the contract. Unless, of course, you sold it to someone else for a higher amount and returned the money order.

Simply offering something for sale, and changing the price without accepting offered money or committing to the sale is bad business, not fraud. 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Ace_of_Hearts said:

Much depend on if you send the money order back!

Much depends on if you, in writing, say that the payment is accepted! (Thereby completing a contract) You posted "Rifle is sold" could be considered  completing the contract. Unless, of course, you sold it to someone else for a higher amount and returned the money order.

Simply offering something for sale, and changing the price without accepting offered money or committing to the sale is bad business, not fraud. 

 

 

I didn't mention fraud. Just stated that the two scenarios I posted are not equivalent.  I would have a lower opinion of someone offering something for sale,  then cancelling the order after someone buys it at the offered price, then relists it at a higher price, then I would of someone who offers it initially at the higher price. Obviously others would deem them equally honorable.  I wouldn't. 

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