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Dirty Dan Dawkins

EAA Bountyhunter revolver. What’s to know?

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I’d just like to hear from someone with experience with these.

Quality, internal workings, etc and so forth. Is it a Colt clone? Firing pin or transfer bar.

 

Thanks

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If I'm not mistaken these were (are?) the last progression of the Hawes, made by J P Sauer in Germany. As such it will be a quality firearm, with good internals. By the the time of this evolution they had gone to transfer bars. They retain a 4 click action. The grip size is Coltish, the frame is larger like a Ruger.  The cartridge heads are recessed so it can be a pain at the loading table. Some will grind a small portion of on chamber out so the LTO can see an empty chamber. The gun can handle a stout load. 

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Thanks. I actually found a Mike Bellevue article on it.  The transfer bar is licensed under Ruger, for what that's worth.

 

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Here's a comparison of the frame sizes (the F.I.E. Arminius is an immediate predecessor of the Bounty Hunter):

 

 

 

44s 3a2.jpg

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I have Hawes Revolvers .

My original one i purchased new in 1978 . Still running strong.

If i had to saw something bad it would be , the Hammers come back farther than other Revilvers.

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Have experience with two calibers of them, .45 and .357. Once slicked a little( mostly springs) they functioned rather well. The recessed heads are somewhat of a pain at the loading table until the watchers get used to you using them. The t-bars seem to hold up, although I had mine altered( bar removed, hammer face built up). I even used my .357 to do my CCL( 4 1/2" bbl). Pretty accurate for our game:blush:

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No knowledge of these revolvers but I sure do know recessed heads as I have shot Freedom Arms Model 97s in CAS for 20 years.  For inspection at loading table I just roll cylinder just to point where observer can see empty chamber.  This is of course not so much to advance in cylinder notch so once observed then cylinder is gently rolled back.  Easy trick once learned, and perhaps a harder understanding from some "observers".  At point of observation, for my own satisfaction, I have probably already fully rotated cylinder checking for no high primers and to see that only five of six chambers are  loaded (although load from Jax ammo bag with designated five round strip for each cylinder).

 

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1 hour ago, Four-Eyed Buck,SASS #14795 said:

Have experience with two calibers of them, .45 and .357. Once slicked a little( mostly springs) they functioned rather well. The recessed heads are somewhat of a pain at the loading table until the watchers get used to you using them. The t-bars seem to hold up, although I had mine altered( bar removed, hammer face built up). I even used my .357 to do my CCL( 4 1/2" bbl). Pretty accurate for our game:blush:

 

 

These are strong guns, but there is that weak link, the transfer bar. Or, at least the little sheet metal tab pinned to the trigger that lifts it.

       Like the Ruger, it has a cylinder base pin with a spring loaded plunger on the end to push the transfer bar back enough so it clears the frame mounted firing pin as the gun is cocked. If the base pin jumps forward the T bar hits the bottom of the firing pin locking things up and if you pull the trigger too hard when this happens that little tab on the trigger comes loose and doesn't lift the T bar enough.

     Simple fix as Buck has found, do away with the T bar and weld up the hammer face.

 

Added;

As for the recessed cylinder, just file a small square notch in it so you can see the brass rim of the loaded chambers and no rim for the empty.

Or better, have that recess shaved off in a lathe.

Edited by Nate Kiowa Jones #6765

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The bounty hunters I've seen have one chamber with a dimple on each side. These dimples are visible on each side of the top strap when that chamber is under the hammer. Show the lt officer the empty chamber with the dimples on each side, then show the dimples on each side of the top strap, Or just face off the cylinder on a lathe.

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2 hours ago, Nate Kiowa Jones #6765 said:

 

 

These are strong guns, but there is that weak link, the transfer bar. Or, at least the little sheet metal tab pinned to the trigger that lifts it.

       Like the Ruger, it has a cylinder base pin with a spring loaded plunger on the end to push the transfer bar back enough so it clears the frame mounted firing pin as the gun is cocked. If the base pin jumps forward the T bar hits the bottom of the firing pin locking things up and if you pull the trigger too hard when this happens that little tab on the trigger comes loose and doesn't lift the T bar enough.

     Simple fix as Buck has found, do away with the T bar and weld up the hammer face.

 

Added;

As for the recessed cylinder, just file a small square notch in it so you can see the brass rim of the loaded chambers and no rim for the empty.

Or better, have that recess shaved off in a lathe.

Hey Nate,

Now you know filing on back side of my FA cylinders just ain't going to happen.:) I figure if LT "officer" can not see the empty chamber when I show it to them then they need to have their wages cut. Heck, can't be much harder than seeing in gap behind hammer when loader points the Ruger up and air for officers observation. :o

Two things I file on my FAs...front sight for zero and usually front hub of cylinder & back face of area where cylinder pin slips into cylinder (for wiper effect of black powder residue to ease cylinder rotation).

How you been?

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3 hours ago, Nate Kiowa Jones #6765 said:

 

 

These are strong guns, but there is that weak link, the transfer bar. Or, at least the little sheet metal tab pinned to the trigger that lifts it.

       Like the Ruger, it has a cylinder base pin with a spring loaded plunger on the end to push the transfer bar back enough so it clears the frame mounted firing pin as the gun is cocked. If the base pin jumps forward the T bar hits the bottom of the firing pin locking things up and if you pull the trigger too hard when this happens that little tab on the trigger comes loose and doesn't lift the T bar enough.

     Simple fix as Buck has found, do away with the T bar and weld up the hammer face.

 

Added;

As for the recessed cylinder, just file a small square notch in it so you can see the brass rim of the loaded chambers and no rim for the empty.

Or better, have that recess shaved off in a lathe.

I had a Wierich years ago that the T bar system broke on. I removed that and instead of welded face of hammer I ground down the front of the hammer, where it fell and made contact at the back of frame. This let the hammer fall enough further that it contacted FP and set of ignition.

 

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