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Shane Not Sean

shotgun rear sights

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If they're banned in the rulebook, I missed it.  Has anyone put these on?  Any idea what type of rear sights were in use back then, other than the standard elevator style that came with my 1873?  Considering something for my 1897 (if legal).  

Edited by Shane Not Sean

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Ventilated ribs and mid-barrel beads are allowed on all types of shotguns.

SHB p.35

 

Quote

Shotgun Sights -

Front sights may be bead or simple post types.

SHB p.37

 

Rear sights for shotguns are not mentioned = NOT LEGAL

REF: SHB p.34

 

Not necessary for CAS.

 

 

Edited by PaleWolf Brunelle, #2495L
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Rear sights onna Shotgun??  Be like a Drag Chute onna Turtle  :)

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3 hours ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

 

Rear sights onna Shotgun??  Be like a Drag Chute onna Turtle  :)

 

You win the interwebs for today. :lol:

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Heck, mine don't even have a front sight.    Causes too much wind drag when trying to move fast..... :lol:

 

..........Widder

 

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On a shotgun your eye is the rear sight. If you keep your cheek down on the stock put the front bead on the target you’ll hit every time!

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Unless ....... the target moves.

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1 hour ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

 

Unless ....... the target moves.

Tru dat!!!

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For starters, a shotgun is pointed not like a rifle that is sighted.  And never owned a shotgun with a rear barrel sight of any kind

Edited by John Boy
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Thank you for playing gentlemen.  Had a feeling this would be the way my thread would go, but figured I’d give it a try anyway.  My issues are numerous but are easily remedied by reloading and shooting again, but thought I’d see if there might be a way to get my shot placement a little more accurate so as to avoid that extra reload (or two).  Here’s the background for my original question.
I just attended my second CAS event and had a blast (even in the pacific NW rain).  Two of the stages had 3 shotgun knock downs lined up right behind each other.  Most everyone was taking the entire row down with one shot.  I asked my mentor where to aim to get’em all in one shot.  He told me, I tried that.  I’m partly colored blind,  it was raining, I was wearing my distance glasses (as I always do) for eye protection and that has the adverse effect of making the front bead blurry.  Long story short, I still could not discern the first target from the second target from the third target, and could not tell if I was aiming “just above the head of the first target” because it was blending in with the other ones behind it  I may try some stages in the future with only non-Rx safety glasses, though that might have an adverse effect on my rifle accuracy.  We’ll see.  Thanks anyway.

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Seriously, I'd add a second bead midway down the barrel, which is SASS legal (according to one of the first posts).  If you're pointing the shotgun correctly, you will only see one bead.  If you see one bead above the other, then you're aiming too high.

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SHANE,

there are numerous Cowboys who have a tendency to carry 'extra' power/extra shot ammo with them

that enhance their chances of getting multiple targets down with one shot.     So don't be to hard on yeself

for having to make extra shots.

I use AA's low noise/low recoil ALL the time and I also have to make multiple shots on target setups such as you described.

 

AND, there are a fair amount of Cowboys who seem to knock em all down with one shot.

 

Good luck on whatever method you decide.    This I will share with you:  if your misses were high, you probably need to focus

on keeping your cheek down on the stock.    And if your slam firing your 97, point LOW on the targets.    For many of us, 

slam firing our 97 has a tendency to make the shotgun to rise a little just as the action closes and fires.

 

Check out my videos on shooting the 97, which are on YouTube and titled:  'Widowmaker Shotgun Dryfire'.   There are 3 of them.

 

..........Widder

 

Edited by Widder, SASS #59054
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Listen to this fella ^^^^^^

He runs a 97 like a turbocharged banjo !

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Shane not Seen . . . .

 

Wasn't too long back at a State Match I fear hit the same target 12, yep Twelve times.  Didn't go down.  TO said, "Nobody else had trouble widit".  6 of us wound up getting a re-shoot for prop failure.  Somedays, they (targets) just don't go down.  However, before you look to modifying your Shotgun, You should probably look to modifying your Tech-Knee-Que.  If your missing a lot with a shotgun, at 12 yards, yer doin somethin wrong.  Although, there ain't no target too big nor too close that I can't find a way to missit. 

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I may have missed a reply from someone else but I wear glasses where I can see my front site (especially important for pistols and rifle) I don't aim to try to knock down multiple SG targets if they are set up that way, you waste time trying to aim, I just shoot the first one and follow up as needed, like Widder said.

 

Randy

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I believe you should check in dedicated shooting glasses.   If the shotgun gives you that problem because of vision, the pistol/rifle will too in the future.  Plus, everywhere I have shot (not many compared to others here) you are required to fire a set number of shells that is equal to the number of targets.  Even if you knock them all down with 1 shot, you still have to fire the rest anyway.        GW

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I had my eye doc roll me up a shooting prescription. Get that front sight in focus! It is OK if the target is blurry. I brought a plastic training gun to his office (in a paper sack) and he dialed in the focus with me holding it out. It is in my record as a "sports prescription."

 

The 'script is somewhere between reading and distance. I can drive with them just fine except I can't always read street names on smaller neighborhood streets until I am driving past them.

 

On edit: For shotgun, your eye is the rear sight per NRA Shotgun Fundamentals training materials. A consistent cheek weld is essential for repeatable accuracy. That and a clear focused front sight should get you in the game.

Edited by John Kloehr
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12 hours ago, G W Wade said:

I believe you should check in dedicated shooting glasses.   If the shotgun gives you that problem because of vision, the pistol/rifle will too in the future.  Plus, everywhere I have shot (not many compared to others here) you are required to fire a set number of shells that is equal to the number of targets.  Even if you knock them all down with 1 shot, you still have to fire the rest anyway.        GW

So far, the pistol and rifle targets have been mostly painted white, and getting my rifle and revolver sites on those have not been a problem.  Just went to the eye doc and my RX has changed a little.  We'll see if that helps.

The instructions at our events for the number of shotgun rounds are usually just "...and shotgun as needed" (i.e., as few or as many as it takes you).

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7 hours ago, John Kloehr said:

I had my eye doc roll me up a shooting prescription. Get that front sight in focus! It is OK if the target is blurry. I brought a plastic training gun to his office (in a paper sack) and he dialed in the focus with me holding it out. It is in my record as a "sports prescription."

 

The 'script is somewhere between reading and distance. I can drive with them just fine except I can't always read street names on smaller neighborhood streets until I am driving past them.

 

On edit: For shotgun, your eye is the rear sight per NRA Shotgun Fundamentals training materials. A consistent cheek weld is essential for repeatable accuracy. That and a clear focused front sight should get you in the game.

Thank you for the explanation on shooting glasses/prescription and where you want the focus to be (and reiteration of the importance of a consistent cheek weld - a good reminder for me to practice that more outside of shooting).  Wish I'd seen these shooting glasses posts before I went to the eye doc.  Maybe she can give me the frequent flyer rate if I go back in to get a sports prescription.

Edited by Shane Not Sean

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7 minutes ago, Shane Not Sean said:

Thank you for the explanation on shooting glasses/prescription and where you want the focus to be (and reiteration of the importance of a consistent cheek weld - a good reminder for me to practice that more outside of shooting).  Wish I'd seen these shooting glasses posts before I went to the eye doc.  Maybe she can give me the frequent flyer rate if I go back in to get a sports prescription.

The prescription is not that expensive, it is the lenses and frames. I got mine in the same material (light-weight poly-carb, qualifies as a safety lens) and the same frames (except a different color) as my everyday glasses. Plus a spare set of everyday glasses 'cuz I have learned st*ff happens.

 

If you only got a pair of everyday glasses, there might be a discount for getting two pair (shooting and a spare everyday pair).

 

Also, I can't shoot for cr*d with progressives (or bifocals); I bobble my head to focus what I am looking at with them. Much better results with single vision lenses.

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I'm lucky to have a World class uspsa shooter as my  optometrist .

Of course I need glasses for every day use, so he recommended mono vision glasses.  Right eye for up close and left eye  for distances. 

I've been told that it's impossible to see clear near/far at the same time with a  mono vision setup (that's what they say)?  but it works for me and I  shoot with both eyes open. 

Once a pond of time many moons ago I had a problem shooting high with my shotgun( so being a Brain Surgeon),  I  cut the stock at the receiver to change the angle bringing the barrel down ( ugly looking gun looks like termites got to it). Now It's my big match SG. I  haven't had to do this with any of the others - go figure.

I reserve the right to edit this post when needed. ;)

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If you are right handed and missing a lot of shotgun targets by a foot or so to the left, you are cross-eye dominant, and seeing the front bead with your left eye instead of the right.  Although there are several ways to attack that problem, learning to shut the left eye is fastest and cheapest.

 

If you are missing a lot over the top of the target, you are not bringing the shotgun to your cheek, but shooting with your head up and even off the stock.  With that approach, you have the barrel pointed over the target when you think you have the bead centered.

 

Work with a good shotgun shooter in your club, and I'll bet he/she will spot a problem right away.

 

Good luck, GJ 

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What Mr. Garrison said. I am also right handed and left eye doninant. I can't hit squat with out my left eye being closed.

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Have you shot your shotgun at paper?  It will tell you if the pattern is centered where you are pointing the gun.  Some guns do not shoot to point of aim.  The problem is made worse by a tight choke and inconsistent mounting.  A wide pattern (open choke) is much more forgiving.  As others have said,  learning to mount your shotgun consistently with the butt contacting your shoulder in the same spot, and your cheek firmly welded to the stock is fundamental.  It may be that the gun simply doesn’t fit you, rather than an eye problem.  If the stock fits you poorly you will never mount the gun consistently.

 

Shooting at paper, both slowly and at match speed will give you good information.  You don’t have to get fancy: a big cardboard shipping carton with 8 1/2 X 11 printer paper taped onto it works just fine.

Edited by J-BAR #18287
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