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Bugler

timing question on 1873 clone

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I have a set of 1873 clones made by ASM , one of which seems to have a timing issue in that while there is a solid strike on the primer from the firing pin, it is about where a rimfire would strike. The round did NOT discharge......

How do you determine that timing is off and what do you do to remedy that?

 

Bugler

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Edited by Bugler
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Is every round like that or just occasionally?  Often over-rotating will cause the off-center hit, usually when cocked fast.  This can be caused or aggravated by late bolt timing, cracked or weak bolt spring, or weak hand spring.

 

If every round is like that, even with slow cocking, then there is a serious alignment problem.

Edited by Abilene, SASS # 27489

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Keeping in mind that I'm not a trained or professional gunsmith,   watch this video and see if your gun shows the same signs of short cylinder rotation.  

 

 

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Only one cartridge was struck off center....will post a photo.

I shoot duelist so I am not an overly aggressive shooter while cocking the revolver.

 

Bugler

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I'd bet dollars to donuts that Abilene has touched  on the solution. If you had only one instance of this it may be an anomaly or it may be the start of something. I think I would change the trigger/bolt spring and see what happens in the future. I think you may find a hairline crack on the bolt side of the current spring causing less than the required pressure to operate the bolt.

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If the hand spring is lighter than stock, I can usually "make" a single action over-rotate by starting to cock the hammer fast and then slowing the pull before reaching full cock.  If it is easy to do on purpose, then it is more likely to happen accidently as well.

Edited by Abilene, SASS # 27489

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Were you by chance slip firing the gun?  That is,  holding the trigger down and thumbing the hammer. 

 

This has only happened once?  Happens often?  Same chamber? 

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No slip hammering, I shoot Duelist, so far has happened once. Will do some more test firing and see if I can replicate.

The gun is bone stock.

Bugler

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Put many spent brass in the chambers and see if the primer hit is duplicated. Asking for an answer for only one round is impossible to determine and respond definitely.  Otherwise there will be a many ‘crap shoot’ responses.  Let us know what you determined and how many than good recommendations can be provided

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You might also closely check the "bolt"  fit into the cylinder lock slots.

 

After some use with a bad fit they can peen over and refuse the bolt consistent access.

 

In other words, it ain't fittin rite.

 

Ol'  #4

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What Abiline said.  When shooting duelist, it is easy to start to cock the hammer fast, then slow a little while the cylinder continues to rotate by inertia.  By the time the bolt drops in the cycle, the cylinder has already rotated too far and the FP misses the primer.  
 

Friction and the hand spring is the only thing that slows rotation of a Colt type cylinder.  So the solution is to go more smoothly when you cock, or put in a little stronger hand spring.

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3 hours ago, Cypress Sam, SASS #10915 said:

What Abiline said.  When shooting duelist, it is easy to start to cock the hammer fast, then slow a little while the cylinder continues to rotate by inertia.  By the time the bolt drops in the cycle, the cylinder has already rotated too far and the FP misses the primer.  
 

Friction and the hand spring is the only thing that slows rotation of a Colt type cylinder.  So the solution is to go more smoothly when you cock, or put in a little stronger hand spring.

 

Since it just happened once, probably just a cocking anomaly.  If it happens again, need to start looking at these things.

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I hade the same problem with one of my ASM . 

The pin holding the firing pin in somehow bent .

Replaced pin no problems.

Looking at pin you couldn't tell it was bent.

Put it on a flat service , roll it you can see it .

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Have you figured anything out?

 

Have you taken the gun apart and cleaned and inspected the parts?   It could be gunk cloying up the works.  It could be the bolt/trigger spring screw loose.  Could be bolt/trigger spring is going soft.  Could be the hand spring clogged up.

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Will do a deep clean on the revolver tomorrow after a military funeral I am playing at. Results will be reported.....on the gun, not the funeral!

 

Bugler

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It appears as though a new bolt and spring are going to solve my problem.....it only lasted 20 years of shooting.....guess they wear out on occassion.

 

I bought it used and have put a mountain range of ammo through it....wonder how many that is anyway?????

 

Will probably replace it's mate as well as I am at it.

 

Bugler

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