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Dantankerous

Knife sharpener?

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Looking for thoughts and opinions on a knife sharpener. I have too many knives that need a new edge. Kitchen and otherwise.

 

Electrical? Manual pull through?

 

Thanks for any help.

 

 

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Per a few of our esteemed Pards here I bought a Lansky system. Best advice I had gotten in a long time. 
 

https://lansky.com/
 

This starter set is a good way to begin:

Lansky Deluxe 5-Stone Sharpening System https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B000B8IEA4/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_fab_V-kCFbN1FWQRX
 

I own one of those Work Sharp belt sharpening systems. I ruined a couple of knives and an expensive pair of scissors with it. I won’t use it on anything decent. As a matter of fact, I don’t use it at all. If you want it I will give it to you, Dan. Send me a PM with your address. I wouldn’t use it on anything you aren’t willing to replace or reshape once it munches the tip off of it. 
 

EDIT: The last sentence is my disclaimer reflecting my experience. Some folks like these and use them with satisfaction. 

Edited by Pat Riot, SASS #13748
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20 minutes ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

Per a few of our esteemed Pards here I bought a Lansky system. Best advice I had gotten in a long time. 
 

https://lansky.com/
 

This starter set is a good way to begin:

Lansky Deluxe 5-Stone Sharpening System https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B000B8IEA4/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_fab_V-kCFbN1FWQRX
 

I own one of those Work Sharp belt sharpening systems. I ruined a couple of knives and an expensive pair of scissors with it. I won’t use it on anything decent. As a matter of fact, I don’t use it at all. If you want it I will give it to you, Dan. Send me a PM with your address. I wouldn’t use it on anything you aren’t willing to replace or reshape once it munches the tip off of it. 

 

Interesting you say that, Pat. I just watched a video on the Work Sharp system.  The advertising video sure makes that look like a wonder tool. Think I will stick with real world experience from people who have tried it. Thank you for the insight. I will look into the Lansky you mention.

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Just now, Dantankerous said:

 

Interesting you say that, Pat. I just watched a video on the Work Sharp system.  The advertising video sure makes that look like a wonder tool. Think I will stick with real world experience from people who have tried it. Thank you for the insight. I will look into the Lansky you mention.

The only thing the Lansky has trouble with are real narrow (skinny) blades. But, I recently discovered they now have a rubber jawed clamp t

hat may help with that. 
 

By “narrow/ skinny” I am talking about blades less than a 1/2” wide. I hand sharpened these using the Lansky stones. 

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I have the Ken Onion system. Works great and it gives you edge angle options depending on how you use the knife. The belts last awhile.

IKe

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4 minutes ago, Dantankerous said:

 

Interesting you say that, Pat. I just watched a video on the Work Sharp system.  The advertising video sure makes that look like a wonder tool. Think I will stick with real world experience from people who have tried it. Thank you for the insight. I will look into the Lansky you mention.

If you want It to play around with it I will still send it to you. If you don’t and anyone else reading this wants it, I will send it to them. 

Edited by Pat Riot, SASS #13748

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My thirty year old Lansky Sharp-A-Vee is ready for retirement and I'm going to stick with Lansky.  I don't need nor want a lot more high tech crap in my life and ceramic sticks in a wood block fits my needs perfectly.  No power cords, batteries, computer chips, moving parts, etc to mess up my simple life.....and the they don't cost very much.

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3 minutes ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

If you want It to play around with it I will still send it to you. If you don’t and anyone else reading this wants it, I will send it to them. 

 

  No reason not to give it a try. Thank you, I'll take you up on the offer. PM on the way.

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That Deluxe 5 Hone Lansky system that Pat linked to is basically what I use- except I put mine together myself using their standard 3 stone kit as a base (adding an Extra Fine Ceramic) and I got a Coarse Serrated hone for my half serrated blades instead of the Extra Coarse.

 

If I was to build one from scratch again, I think that I'd swap the standard Coarse for the Coarse Diamond.  The Diamond hones seem to move steel faster and that's handy at the beginning of rebuilding an edge from scratch.

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When I was using hand tools to make Windsor chairs I sharpened everything using a strip of sandpaper glueD to a piece of plate class. Use the fine grits, 1000 or so. Nothing really course unless you have dinged up the blade.   The method was dubbed scary sharp. There are videos on the web now.  You don’t have to go for special sandpapers and 6000 is overkill

 

 

AND it’s cheap.

Edited by Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984
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Spyderco makes the best one and it's the KISS of all sharpeners.

Sharpens serrated blades and scissors.

OLG 

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34 minutes ago, Dantankerous said:

 

  No reason not to give it a try. Thank you, I'll take you up on the offer. PM on the way.

It’ll go out tomorrow. 

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Regarding the Lansky system. The only issue I had was I had to adjust the rods to ensure a 90 degree angle. Other than that I find that it is a really good sharpening system. 
 

I am getting ready to buy the stones for serrated and curved (hook) blades. I am also going to buy another box and the leather strop attachment. 

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Soft Arkansas stone followed by a smooth steel for regular straight edges,  Spyderco sharpener for serrated edges.

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Howdy,

I have a Buck sharpener. I have not seen any for sale lately except on ebay.

Two crock stix just like lansky. But mine only has one angle.

A friend of a friend was going fishing and had a box of knives he was taking

somewhere to sharpen. I just happened to have my little sharpener.

He brought in the box of knives and we talked and had a couple beers and

I started sharpening the knives.  

When he was ready to leave he asked when the knives would be done.

I asked him to pick one.  

He had a puzzled look on his face as he pointed to one.

I took his choice and pulled a sheet of typing paper out of the wastebasket.

With one swipe the paper cut in two. Smooth as could be.

He thought that would do and took the box home.

Best

CR

 

 

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3 hours ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

When I was using hand tools to make Windsor chairs I sharpened everything using a strip of sandpaper glueD to a piece of plate class. Use the fine grits, 1000 or so. Nothing really course unless you have dinged up the blade.   The method was dubbed scary sharp. There are videos on the web now.  You don’t have to go for special sandpapers and 6000 is overkill

 

 

AND it’s cheap.

An advantage of this technique is that the surface is always perfectly flat.

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5 hours ago, Null N. Void said:

I vote for Lansky.  This is the one I have.

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IJ9L24W/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Very easy to use and store.

Just like my old Sharp-A-Vee except they upgraded the holder.  Mine is a piece of wood with holed drilled to hold the rods.

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In a pinch I use the bottom of a ceramic coffee mug. It's about a medium grit ceramic sharpener.

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Thank you, all. Looks to be some good advice here. 

 

:D

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We go the beach most every year.  There is a disabled Vietnam vet that has a store with knives, leather and things mostly for bikers and goths.

I always take him my knives (7 this year). He charges $2 each to sharpen and oil, and does a better job than me.  

I hit them on a graphite stick or a whetstone between visits.

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I have the Lansky or if you want a fancy Lansky there's this one - it is more adjustable from what I've read - KME Precision Knife Sharpener System with 4 Gold Series Diamond Hones. I think the best are just plain sharpening stones if you can learn how to use them with very measured and freehand repeatable strokes, just like trying to do caligraphy they don't work well for me. So Lansky for poor old me. Cause it's so much cheaper than ruining a blade and/or wicked edge or other systems.

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I have some of that green honing paste embedded into a 8" MDF disc.  I spin it up to around 800 rpm on the lathe and it will put a razor edge on a knife.  I use it to put the final edge on everything from carving knives to a machete.

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I have many sharpening tools. The old fashioned carborundum stone both oil stone and a wet stone, I have diamond "stones" and a home made, granite slab with valve lapping grits. They work great and take some time. I also use 2000 and 3000 grit 3M polishing paper to finish the blade off using these. I have a Lansky setup and it works fast and pretty good, just not real happy with the many times I have nicked myself on blade.  The Ken Onion is fast and will eat a blade if you loose attention. But! it does put a pretty nice edge on a knife if you follow the instructions to the T and do not get in too much of a hurry. I finish off with crock sticks. I will say this for the Ken Onion company, I have my first one break the drive fitting and they sent me a replacement at no cost. I had the machine about 3 years at that point. I was impressed.

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20 hours ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

When I was using hand tools to make Windsor chairs I sharpened everything using a strip of sandpaper glueD to a piece of plate class. Use the fine grits, 1000 or so. Nothing really course unless you have dinged up the blade.   The method was dubbed scary sharp. There are videos on the web now.  You don’t have to go for special sandpapers and 6000 is overkill

 

 

AND it’s cheap.

I have 2 pieces of 8 X 10 plate glass (3/8 thick). Glue full sheets of 3M Wet or Dry sandpaper in various grits to the surfaces (four surfaces, 4 grits).

 

For kitchen (or rope or box) knives, everyday utility blades, 400 grit is a good choice. This grit leaves a "tooth" on the edge which cuts great.

 

I do take plane blades to a much finer grit (mirror polish) for the back and bevel but the actual cutting edge does not need that perfection.

 

It is cheap, but a bit slow (about the speed of traditional stones, but instead of flattening a worn oil stone, razor off the old paper and apply a new sheet.

 

There are other much faster knife sharpeners (like the rotary disks), but they can't do planes or chisels.

Edited by John Kloehr
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For knives, Spyderco Triangle Sharpmaker.  Versatile, great instructions, won't accidently ruin blade (like electric sander types), good to go for less than a full time pro.

20200928_082844.jpg

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My favorite.....for mower blades, axes and all knives

 

https://www.worksharptools.com/shop/sharpeners/powered/original-knife-tool-sharpener/

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For around $50.00, plus the belts, this isn't a bad way to go if you have a lot of edges to keep sharp.

BELT SANDER

BELTS

 

 

 

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On recommendations I bought the Laskey basic set. So far it is kicking my butt big time. There is a technique to it I just can't seem to get the hang of. My son is a fledgling knife maker, got all kinds of grinders and sharpeners and such so I hand them off to him. 

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Stole this from Raylan on another thread.

 

This guy has tested knife sharpeners, and many other items. A good source of info.

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2rzsm1Qi6N1X-wuOg_p0Ng/videos

 

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4 hours ago, Clay Mosby said:

On recommendations I bought the Laskey basic set. So far it is kicking my butt big time. There is a technique to it I just can't seem to get the hang of. My son is a fledgling knife maker, got all kinds of grinders and sharpeners and such so I hand them off to him. 

Mount the clamp in the same spots every time.

 

I only use one guide rod- which I have "adjusted" to be bent 90 degrees.  I move it between the hones and lay both the rod and the hone on a flat surface (stone up) with the set screw loose to make sure they are aligned before cinching the set screw down.  That should keep the geometry consistent enough through the entire process. That keep me from removing steel that doesn't need to be removed and concentrating on the job at hand.

 

Work one side of the edge for a set number of strokes, flip to the other side and repeat.  The idea is to grind down until there's a thin 'wire' or burr of steel on the side of the edge not in contact with the stone and to work it back and forth until there's a sharp edge on the body of the knife.

 

When edge building with coarse stones, I work in groups of 50 strokes. Once the edge is established, I do 20-25 strokes on each side with a medium stone until I'm satisfied with the sharpness.  Heavy use blades stop here.  Fine and Extra-Fine hones are for refining or perfecting a fine, razor sharp edge that is overkill of rough use and usually too delicate for prolonged rough use.

 

Most knives don't need sharpening, they just need burnishing.  When you use a blade, the microscopic edge bends to one side.  Burnishing straightens the edge.  For fine edges, I use a leather strop to burnish.  Coarser edges get ran over by a chef's steel regularly. The direction of the burnish is immaterial. You straighten the edge just as well dragging the blade down the burnisher going away from the edge as you do going edge towards you.

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