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Cactus Jack Calder

Another Reloading Question

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Right now I’m working on my 45 ACP brass. I sized and deprimed the cases, ran them in an ultrasonic cleaner and rinsed them really well with warm water. 
I used OLG’s suggestion and rolled them back and forth hanging in an old towel. The outsides are dry, however, I can see a little water in the bottom of the shells. The question of the day is; What is the best (most efficient) way of drying the inside of the cases? 
Have at it and thank you!


Please note, I am alone here. Not without family, without a mentor to teach me his/her methods of reloading. So you’s guys are my de facto mentors. Any help is greatly appreciated. 

CJ

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An inexpensive food dehydrator makes a great brass drier.  

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I've never used water to clean my .45 ACP brass.  Never seen a need to do so.   I just tumble them in the corn cob and then reload them.

That being said, I have on occasion had to use water to rinse our some 12 gauge all brass shells.   After cleaning them, I shook out the excess water and left them sitting out overnight on the counter to dry.

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Lyman case dryer

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I spread all my brass out on cookie sheet(s) and sit them in the sun for an hour or so.

 

I bought the cookie sheets specifically for the reloading room and use them for a multitude of tasks.

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I pre-clean my brass in a mix of H2O & Simple Green and as stated above then dry them in an old food dehydrator for 1 1/2 hours. They come out dry and no water spots. Then into the vibratory tumbler with corn cob/polish for another 1 1/2 hours. They always look like new.

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Several ideas I can work with.

1. Bingo, My son up the road had a dehydrator. I think he stopped using it. I’ll have to ask him about that.

2. SD thanks, I just remembered I have a cookie sheet not suitable for food that I can use.
3. Loophole, Mr. Miculek certainly has his method worked out efficiently. I can use one of the ovens. We have two, one over, one under. The under one is used for storage, so I can probably use it. There shouldn’t be much odor involved. 
 

Thank you all,

Look for future what to do’s as I progress down the road. :)

 

CJ

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I just put them on an old towel and put in the sun to dry.

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If I'm not in a hurry, I lay them out on a plastic sheet for a few days in the basement.  If I'm in a hurry, I use a small toaster oven I picked up for a couple of bucks at a Salvation Army Store.  About a half an hour at 200 degrees usually does it.  It doesn't come out pretty and shiny, but it is clean and serviceable.

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there's a couple ways that i've tried and work well. I have an old chicken egg incubator and used that. Works the same as the more expensive case dryers or food dehydrators. I've also spread them out on some hardwire cloth nailed to a 1x2 frame and put a fan blowing on them. both ways will get them dry overnight. I'm sure there's lots of other ways. I will say do not put them in a pillow case and toss them in the dryer. besides the fact that it's pretty loud the mrs wasnt real thrilled with it. 

 

Jack

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2 hours ago, Cactus Jack Calder said:

...The outsides are dry, however, I can see a little water in the bottom of the shells. The question of the day is; What is the best (most efficient) way of drying the inside of the cases? ...

CJ

 

I place my wet tumble brass on a towel and let air dry.  Takes a day or three depending on the humidity inside my house.  Reckon a cowpoke could speed that up by setting them in the sun.

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Wife's hair dryer?

Edited by Marshal Chance Morgun
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Sometimes I put them on a cookie sheet and put them in the oven around 150-170.  Sometimes I lay them on a towel on my bench with the case mouth facing the edge of the bench. Then I put an oscillating fan in front of them and leave them for a few hours. So far so good.

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Well I found my old cookie sheet and put them in the oven at 170 F. one layer all laying flat so that both ends are off the sheet. It seems to be working ok. I will use the sun next time with my 38 spl brass..

 

I’m sure I’ll be back for more help soon. I am looking at YouTube for reloading videos also. 
 

Thanks again.

CJ

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When I was shooting BP, I would wash them and set them outside on a cookie sheet. If it was near freezing on a cookie sheet in the basement for a day or so.

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57 minutes ago, Chancy Shot, SASS #67163 said:

Did Penny see this?  You are living dangerously.

 

Chancy


Tell your wife to get a new hair dryer and appropriate the old one.  Or spend $15 on a cheap heat gun from Harbor Freight.

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To dry brass I have used the oven set at 250, bake timer set for one hour. Had a live round in a batch of brass I forgot to pull when done. The wife went to preheat the oven to 450 for a pizza. The live round cooked off about the time the oven was up to temp. It was a bit exciting for just a little bit. The case split and both the bullet and split case stayed in the tinfoil pan I had the brass in. I think it was good that the round was a smokeless round rather than BP or Sub.  

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I use the same toaster oven that I use to bake my cast bullets after powder coat.

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Put them outside on a table on top of a towel for a couple of days depending on how warm it is

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Living as far south as I do in the summer I can lay them in the sun for an afternoon and they’re dry.  Did you de-prime before tumbling?  It makes a difference for air flow.  In the winter I use an air compressor to blow out any water then lay them out on the shop floor (in front of the dehumidifier).  Always check to make sure the primer pocket is dry before reloading.

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